Sociology - Anthropology

Sociology & Anthropology


Both sociology and anthropology take a scientific approach to understanding human social behavior. While sociologists have historically relied more on statistical analysis, anthropologists have developed a distinctive method, ethnography, which involves immersion in the languages and cultures of others.

The Bachelor of Arts in Sociology-Anthropology program is a blend of the theories and practices of the interrelated sciences. Your academic study will concentrate on an examination of inequality, race, gender and ethnic relations, poverty, globalization, and social institutions like the family, religion, government, and business.

Sociology and anthropology are subjects in which interaction with other human beings is utterly central. So most courses in our department and many of our class assignments involve face-to-face learning with fellow New Yorkers and people from other cultures and countries. It is our belief that immersion experiences in other communities, cultures and nations is an essential part of any educated person’s life. Since this is especially important for sociology and anthropology majors, the department strongly encourages travel and study abroad. The department encourages students to undertake independent research projects. In addition, students can develop an honors thesis working closely with one of the faculty members.

B.A. in Sociology-Anthropology

Sociology and anthropology are allied social science fields. Dedicated to exploring the fact that every aspect of our identity is shaped by our relationships with others, these disciplines help us to understand ourselves, the people around us and those whose ways of living are very different from our own. Sociologists and anthropologists produce research that influences local, national and international policy-making.

Central to the interests of sociologists are inequality; race; gender and ethnic relations; poverty; globalization; and social institutions like the family, religion, government and business. Anthropologists address many of the same issues but with a cross-cultural approach and a stronger focus on ritual, language and symbolism. Anthropologists also bring prehistory and the place of human beings as primates into our understanding of what it means to be human. Both sociology and anthropology take a scientific approach to understanding human social behavior. While sociologists have historically relied more on statistical analysis, anthropologists have developed a distinctive method, ethnography, which involves immersion in the languages and cultures of others.

This joint degree fosters the intellectual and personal growth necessary to make us more flexible, analytical and tolerant human beings. These qualities are always in demand and are essential to working and living in an ever-more complex world.

All of the Department’s full-time faculty members hold Ph.D.s and have conducted field research in various regions around the world, bringing a global awareness to everything they teach. They are active scholars who publish and do research in addition to teaching and contributing to campus and university life.


Graduation Requirements

Students must satisfy the Placement, Proficiency, Orientation and Core Curriculum criteria outlined in the Graduation Requirements section of this bulletin.

Core Curriculum requirements for this major are summarized below:
Core Seminar 3 credits
Humanities
English Composition 3 credits
English Literature 6 credits
Philosophy 6 credits
Foreign Language 6 credits
Social Sciences
History 6 credits
Social Sciences (ANT 4, ANT 5, SOC 3) 6 credits
Science and Mathematics
Mathematics 3 - 4 credits
Science 10 credits
Communication, Visual & Performing Arts
Speech 3 credits
Visual & Performing Arts (ART, DNC, MUS, THE) 3 credits
Distribution Requirement

Must complete two courses numbered 100 or above in one of the following subjects: Economics, History, Psychology, Political Science. (Introductory courses must be completed.)

Major Requirements
The following two courses are required:
SOC 111 Social Research 3.00
ANT 137 Ethnography 3.00
One (1) of the following two courses is required:
SOC 116 Sociological Theory 3.00
ANT 117 Anthropological Theory 3.00
Fifteen (15) additional credits in Advanced (above 100 level) Sociology - Anthropology required.
One (1) course from Social Science 200 series required. (Must be a Senior Capstone Seminar)
Credit and GPA Requirements
  • Minimum Total Credits: 128
  • Minimum Liberal Arts & Sciences Credits: 96
  • Minimum Major Credits: 27
  • Minimum Credits in Courses > 100 Level: 48
  • Distribution Course Requirements: see above
  • Minimum Major GPA: 2.0
  • Minimum Overall GPA: 2.0

Explore the World

Sociology and Anthropology majors have the opportunity to learn about the cultures of the world through our one-of-a-kind LIU Global centers in Costa Rica, China, Europe, and Australia.

FIND OUT

Focused Study

The bachelor's program offers several themes of customization within the study of sociology and anthropology, including World Cultures and Societies, Urban Studies, Religious Studies, and Family Studies.

CONTACT

Richard L. Conolly
College of Liberals Arts & Sciences

David Cohen, Dean