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Faculty

Daniel Ginsburg

Assistant Professor of Biomedical Sciences

B.S., Ph.D., Stanford University

Description

I received my Ph.D. in genetics from Stanford University working on using phage integrases to do site-specific integration in the human genome for the purpose of gene therapy. Most viral gene therapy vectors were shown to have an integration site preference for the promoters or coding sequences of actively transcribed genes. Thus, development of site-specific integration systems was important. During graduate school, I became interested in the mechanism of how these integrases actually carried out integration in the human genome, and found that integration was influenced by the cellular DNA repair and transcription machinery. This piqued my interest in transcription, and I did my postdoctoral work at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) on the role of chromatin during transcription in yeast. Specifically, I focused on how the NuA4 lysine acetyltransferase stimulates transcription elongation.  I am currently extending that research, investigating the relationship between histone methylation and acetylation during transcription elongation. While histone methylation is found at actively transcribed genes, its only known function is to stimulate interaction of histone deacetylase complexes with histones, presumably to prevent cryptic transcription. I am working to more fully determine the function of different histone methylation marks in stimulating histone acetylation and other chromatin modifications. I am also interested in the overlapping functions of different chromatin remodeling complexes and the kinetics of transcription elongation. In the more distant future, I would like to investigate the role of chromatin in limiting the access of various factors to the DNA.

In addition to research, I am passionate about science education. During graduate school, I was involved in a program between the Stanford University Genetics Department and the Tech Museum of San Jose, California to redesign the museum’s genetics exhibit. In addition to developing the content of the permanent exhibit, I helped create hands on activities for visitors as well as working as a docent to help guide people through the exhibit.  While a postdoctoral fellow, I taught in and directed a team-taught course for post baccalaureate fellows. The purpose of the course was to teach the fellows how to critically analyze primary literature and to expose them to the variety of research conducted at NICHD. I also taught a biochemistry course to a group of students from Colgate University doing research for a semester at the National Institutes of Health. As an Assistant Professor in the Biomedical Sciences Department at LIU Post, I am currently teaching classes on molecular biology, virology, and research methods.

Specialties

The role of chromatin during transcription elongation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Publications

Co-author, Govind C.K., Ginsburg D., Hinnebusch A.G.  “Measuring dynamic changes in histone modifications and nucleosome density during activated transcription in budding yeast.”  Methods Mol Biol. 2012;833:15-27.

Co-author, Govind CK, Qiu H, Ginsburg DS, Ruan C, Hofmeyer K, Hu C, Swaminathan V, Workman JL, Li B, Hinnebusch AG.  “Phosphorylated Pol II CTD recruits multiple HDACs, including Rpd3C(S), for methylation-dependent deacetylation of ORF nucleosomes.”  Mol Cell. 2010 Jul 30;39(2):234-46.

Co-author, Ginsburg D.S., Govind, C.K., and Hinnebusch, A.G.  “The NuA4 lysine acetyltransferase Esa1 is targeted to coding regions and stimulates transcription elongation with Gcn5.”  Mol Cell Biol.,  29(24):6473-87.  2009.

Co-author, Ginsburg D.S. and Calos M.P.  “Site-specific integration with C31 integrase for prolonged expression of therapeutic genes.”  Adv Genet.  54:179-87.  2005.

Co-author, Ginsburg D.S., Thyagarajan, B., Phillips, J. E., and Calos, M. P. “Gene delivery by viruses.” In Encyclopedia of Life Sciences http://www.els.net/ London; Nature Publishing Group.  2004.

Co-author, Stoll S.M., Ginsburg D.S., Calos M.P.  “Phage TP901-1 site-specific integrase functions in human cells.”  J Bacteriol. 184(13):3657-63.  2002.

Co-author, Thyagarajan B., Olivares E.C., Hollis R.P., Ginsburg D.S., and Calos M.P. “Site-specific genomic integration in mammalian cells mediated by phage phiC31 integrase.” Mol. Cell Biol., 21(12):3926-34.  2001.

Lectures and Presentations

Patel S.R., Kollu V.S., Patel D.G., and Ginsburg D.S.  “NuA4 binds methylated nucleosomes through multiple subunits.”  Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Mechanisms of Eukaryotic Transcription meeting.  2011.

Ginsburg D.S., Patel S.R., and Hinnebusch A.G.  “NuA4 links histone H3 methylation to H3 and H4 acetylation.”  Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Mechanisms of Eukaryotic Transcription meeting.  2011.

Ginsburg D.S., Govind C.K., and Hinnebusch A.G.  “The NuA4 lysine acetyltransferase Esa1 is targeted to coding regions and stimulates transcription elongation with Gcn5.”  Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Mechanisms of Eukaryotic Transcription meeting.  2009.

Govind C.K., Hofmeyer K., Ginsburg D.S., and Hinnebusch A.G.  “Recruitment of HDACs RPD3S and SET3C (HOS2) Requires Ser5/6-CDT Kinase Kin28 But Not Histone H3 Methylation.”   Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Mechanisms of Eukaryotic Transcription meeting.  2009.

Ginsburg D.S., Govind C.K., and Hinnebusch A.G.  “NuA4 Acts As a Positive Elongation Factor Through Stimulation of RSC Recruitment.”  American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Transcriptional Regulation meeting.  2008.

Chalberg T.W., Ginsburg D.S., Kirby P.J., Olivares E.C., Portlock J.L., Thyagarajan B., and Calos M.P.  “Integration sites used by the phiC31 site-specific integrase in the human genome.” American Society of Gene Therapy annual meeting.  2004.

Ginsburg D.S., Sclimenti C.R., Thyagarajan B., and Calos M.P.  “Development of an Improved Site-Specific Integration System.”  American Society of Gene Therapy annual meeting.  2002.

Professional Affiliations

Council on Undergraduate Research

Metropolitan Association of College and University Biologists

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