Counseling and Development

Advance Certificate in Clinical Mental Health Counseling


The Advanced Certificate in Clinical Mental Health Counseling is a “licensure qualifying” bridge program approved by the New York State Education Department (NYSED), Office of the Professions. The Advanced Certificate in Clinical Mental Health Counseling program offers the opportunity for individuals with a master’s degree in school counseling or other related counseling degree to meet the educational requirements for licensure as a mental health counselor in New York State. The 15 credit advanced certificate is predicated upon the individual having completed a master’s degree in school counseling with a minimum of 48 credits in specified core educational content areas as delineated in the state regulations for mental health counselor licensure. Individuals who graduated from a program of less than 48 credits will be required to take additional coursework above the 15 credits to ensure meeting the state requirement of a minimum of 60 graduate credits. Upon application candidates will have their transcript(s) reviewed by the department to ascertain the needed number of graduate credits required for the advanced certificate.

Upon completion of the advanced certificate the individual will automatically meet the educational requirements for licensure as a mental health counselor in New York State. They will then be eligible to file for a “limited permit” and begin accruing the 3000 post master’s experiential hours required for licensure. They will also be eligible to file to take the National Clinical Mental Health Counselor Examination (NCMHCE) which is the licensure examination designated by the State. There is also the possibility that the Office of the Professions may accept experiential hours gained after the receipt of the individual’s master’s degree if the experience was in an approved setting under the supervision of a recognized licensed mental health professional.

For Gainful Employment information, visit www.liu.edu/ge.


Accreditation

Both our School Counseling and Clinical Mental Health Counseling programs at LIU Post are fully accredited by the Council of Accreditation for Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). By maintaining CACREP accreditation, the program strives to provide the highest quality of faculty and curriculum standards. 

CACREP Liaison
Contact: JuneAnn.Smith@liu.edu

CACREP Outcome and Assessment Report 2017-2018


LIU Post has been approved by OASAS (Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services) as an Education and Training Provider. Our master’s degree program in Clinical Mental Health Counseling meets all the educational requirements for the  CASAC-T (Certified Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Counselor – Trainee Certificate). 

The Advanced Certificate in Clinical Mental Health Counseling is a licensure qualifying bridge program approved by the New York State Education Department (NYSED), Office of the Professions.  The Advanced Certificate in CMHC offers the opportunity for individuals with a master’s degree in school counseling or other related counseling fields to meet the educational requirements for licensure as a clinical mental health counselor in New York State.


Course Descriptions

COURSES IN COUNSELING AND DEVELOPMENT

EDC 601 Foundations of Clinical Mental Health Counseling and Ethics (CMHC)
To be taken as the first course in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling specialization, within the student’s first 15 semester hours of work. This course is an introduction to preventive education and counseling for mental and emotional health as uniquely available in mental health centers. The course prepares students to work in counseling teams and enrichment programs, to handle referral procedures, community relations and teamwork, and to deal with mental health problems in terms of their etiology and the innovations in the field. The Graduate Handbook is required reading for the course.
3 credits
Fall and Spring

EDC 602 Introduction to School Counseling and Ethics (SC)
This is the basic introductory course that exposes the student to the world of professional counseling with an emphasis on school counseling. It also provides the student with training in ethics within the counseling profession with specific attention given to the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics and the Code of Ethics of the American School Counselors Association (ASCA). This foundation course in school counseling prepares students to apply basic counseling skills in an elementary, middle or high school setting. Emphasis is placed on the expanded role of the school counselor in curriculum, instruction, assessment, and consultation as well as providing training in the ASCA National Model of School Counseling. Focus is placed on the various roles of the elementary, middle and secondary school counselor, tools and strategies appropriate in those settings, and consultation and collaboration with other school personnel. The course will also cover concepts and techniques of the counseling process in the school setting, behavioral and developmental problems, and enhancing the creative capabilities of students. It will help to prepare prospective school counselors to develop, plan, and implement a comprehensive school counseling program, including the college admission process, and to understand their roles as professional school counselors in helping students reach their academic, career, social, and personal potential. The course will also explore job opportunities on Long Island, New York City, upstate New York and nationally. The Graduate Handbook is required reading for the 
course.
3 credits Fall only

EDC 608 Diagnostic Interviewing and Assessment in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (CMHC)
This course is a weekly seminar focused on, but not limited to, the following: the etiology, diagnosis, treatment, referral and prevention of mental disorders through the utilization of current diagnostic assessment tools, including the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) and International Classification of Diseases (ICD); psychological assessment, case conceptualization, psychopathology, diagnostic intake interviewing, mental status evaluation, biopsychosocial history, mental health history, psychological assessment for treatment planning and caseload management guidelines. 
Prerequisites: EDC 610 and EDC 615
3 credits
Fall only

EDC 610 Psychopathology for the Professional Counselor (CMHC and SC)
This course provides an in-depth review of a broad spectrum of psychopathological conditions as defined in the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association. The course will focus on understanding the etiology, prevalence and incidence, signs and symptoms of the various 
mental disorders delineated in the DSM. A focus will also be placed on learning the criteria necessary to provide a differential diagnosis. There will also be an emphasis on increasing understanding of clinical issues and current research in development and maladaptive behavior and on comparing and contrasting different theoretical perspectives on each mental disorder. Ethical issues and limitations related to current diagnostic systems will be discussed. This course will provide the student with a solid foundation in psychopathology and enhance the student’s mastery in understanding the pathogenesis of the various mental disorders. 
3 credits
Fall and Spring

EDC 611 Evidence Based Treatment Planning in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (CMHC)

Evidenced based practice (EBP) has steadily become the standard of care in the mental health field. This course is a weekly seminar focused on introducing clinical mental health counseling student trainees to the process of empirically informing their psychotherapy treatment plans. Empirically supported treatments (EST) are treatments whose efficacy has been demonstrated through clinical research. The course will cover: psychopharmacology; cognitive behavior therapy; rational emotive cognitive behavior therapy; behavior therapy; eye movement desensitization reprocessing; dialectical behavior therapy; acceptance and commitment 
therapy, motivational interviewing; exposure therapies; interpersonal psychotherapy; and other empirically supported treatment approaches as necessary.
Prerequisite: EDC 608
3 credits
Spring only

EDC 612 Trauma (Counseling Elective)
This course validates and addresses the emergent new field of trauma studies and the growing body of trauma related best practices. It provides mental health counselors and other mental health practitioners with a comprehensive review of the various types of trauma experiences, the human vulnerability for traumatic experiences a cross the life span, and the intersections among trauma, crisis and disaster events. It discusses pertinent diagnostic and case conceptualization issues as well as presents individual systems interventions and collaborations. The course offers and presents
a rich array of trauma related resources which includes websites, 
films, manuals, DVDs, and a variety of other useful tools. 
3 credits Rotating Basis

EDC 613 Diversity and Socio-Cultural Issues in Counseling (CMHC and SC)
Major twenty first century contributions of sociology and anthropology will be examined with a view to understanding the role of sociocultural factors in human development and behavior. This course will also 
examine the impact of the sociocultural viewpoint on contemporary concepts of adaptive and maladaptive human behavior and related mental health issues.
3 credits
Fall and Spring

EDC 614 Human Growth and Development Over the Lifespan (CMHC and SC)

This course focuses on understanding the principles and rationale of developmental counseling over the lifespan from a multicultural perspective. Students become familiar with the primary functions of the developmental counselor: counseling, consulting, coordinating, assessment and advocacy. Students will examine the 
developmental theories of Piaget, Erikson, Vygosky and others. They will examine the cognitive, physical, social and emotional development of the individual during early childhood, middle childhood, adolescence and adulthood. In addition to an overview of developmental stages and developmental tasks which children face, the course includes exploration and experimentation with various and unique methods used in developmental counseling. Students will explore various developmental crises and impediments to optimum development and, in small groups, do an oral report of their findings.  They will compile a developmental portfolio, presenting characteristics of each developmental milestone, and develop a comprehensive guidance plan to address the developmental needs during the 
school years. 
A pre-requisite or co-requisite of EDC 601 or EDC 602
3 credits
Fall and Spring

EDC 615 Theories of Counseling (CMHC and SC)
This is a basic course in counseling theories and techniques and their application within a multicultural and diverse society. Students gain an understanding of the major theories of counseling and psychotherapy, (e.g. psychoanalytic, existential, person-centered, gestalt, reality, behavioral, cognitive behavioral and family systems, etc). In addition, the counselor as a person and a professional is explored as well as ethical issues in counseling and therapy.
Pre-requisites or Co-requisites: EDC 601or 602
3 credits
Fall and Spring

EDC 616 Family Counseling (CMHC)
This course offers a consideration of theories, practices and related activities with couples, parents and/or other related adults and children. Included in the course is a survey of some major trends and problems associated with individual adjustments, adaptations and other reactions within family and social settings.
3 credits
Fall only

EDC 617 Principles of Couple Counseling (Elective)
A study of the theoretical and practical aspects of couple counseling from initial referral to termination. The difference between this form and individual, group or family counseling will be examined in order to understand the clinical issues involved. Both the object relations and the systemic theories will be studied with emphasis on the clinical application to help couples change, according to their therapeutic goals.
3 credits
Spring only

EDC 652 Counselor’s Approach to Human Sexuality (Elective)
A study of human sexuality from its normal manifestations and development to its dysfunctions. The student will be guided to examine his/her own attitudes and values in this area and to learn counseling approaches to problems and questions related to sexuality.
3 credits
Rotating basis

EDC 654 Introduction to Addictions Counseling(Elective)
Alcoholism, addiction and substance abuse as behavioral psychological problems are analyzed to enable professional counselors to integrate current theories of abuse and addiction and etiological models into their work with individuals manifesting problems with abuse and dependence on alcohol or other substances. The course will provide a comprehensive overview of the full spectrum of addictive disorders and their consequences. Approaches to the assessment and evaluation of alcoholism and substance abuse will be 
reviewed, discussed and analyzed, as well as, cross cultural concerns and considerations. Training in tobacco use and nicotine dependence will also be covered. Ethical guidelines for addiction counseling will be addressed as detailed in the ethical guidelines of the National Association for Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors 
(NAADAC).
3 credits
Fall only

EDC 657 Treatment Approaches in Addictions Counseling (Elective)
Treatment planning and treatment setting are critical elements related to the efficacy of all substance abuse programs. This course continues the study of addictions counseling and substance abuse by building upon the concepts of accurate assessment and diagnosis. Students will become familiarize with the processes of treatment planning and the various approaches to treatment including psychotherapeutic, group, pharmacotherapy, and 12-step programs, as well as maintenance and relapse prevention. The course will covered the various treatment populations including families, persons with disabilities, children, adolescents, college students and the LGBT 
population. Co-occurring disorders to addiction treatment will also be reviewed. 
Pre-requisite: EDC 654
3 credits
Spring only

EDC 658 Critical Treatment Issues Confronting Professional Counselors (Elective)
Newly graduated mental health professionals are frequently confronted with specific mental health issues or common client problems for which they do not feel adequately prepared to deal with. Such mental health issues/problems include eating disorders, sexual abuse, self-injurious behavior, body-image disorders, suicide, trauma, grief/bereavement and sexual minorities. This course will provide the counselor trainee with essential information on these critical mental health issues so that they will develop a solid foundation from which to develop competencies and skills necessary to effectively treat clients manifesting such issues. This course is intended to enhance awareness on important mental health issues that will promote professional competence, as well as provide sufficient basic information about the treatment options available and recommendations for resources to consult. 
3 credits 
Rotating basis

EDC 659 School Counseling: College Admissions & Educational Planning (SC)
This course provides a deeper exploration into the multifaceted roles of the school counselor. Topics of discussion include the processes of educational planning, the college admissions process, family community partnerships, students with special needs and varying exceptionalities, the impact of current special education regulation, and current educational standards.
Pre-requisite EDC 602
3 credits
Spring only

EDC 660 Practicum in Psychological Testing for Counselors (CMHC)
This course is a laboratory experience designed to develop adequate understandings and competencies with respect to concerns, issues, and implementation factors related to administration, scoring, recording and interpretations of aptitude, intelligence tests, as well as interest and personality inventories. 
Prerequisite: EDC 601
3 credits
Spring only

EDC 668 Counseling Pre-Practicum (CMHC and SC)
This is a basic counseling laboratory course designed to provide supervised practical counseling experience from a life span and a multicultural perspective that can be applied in the school or agency. Students learn the basics in terms of the active listening skills and the use of appropriate counseling techniques through role-play and other activities. Students will be required to complete three (3) actual tape recorded sessions with an individual who will serve as a “practice” client. These tape recorded sessions will serve as material for in-class discussions on how to utilize basic counseling techniques in a simulated therapeutic encounter. Interview summaries, detailed analysis, and other relevant counseling experiences are a part of the course. Orientation to the role of the professional counselor and ethical concerns are discussed.
Pre-requisite or co-requisite of
EDC 601 or 602, EDC 615
3 credits 
Fall and Spring

EDC 669 Counseling Practicum (CMHC and SC)
This course is an in depth counseling laboratory course designed to provide supervised practical counseling experience from a life span and multicultural perspective through successful completion of 100 hours of to witch sixty (60) hours of observation, interaction, and supervision at a school or mental health agency site; thirty (30) 
hours of direct service via individual and group counseling to clients at that site; and ten (10) hours off site with clients who will be audio-taped. The purpose of the sixty hours, which can be interspersed throughout the semester, is to acclimate the practicum students to the environment in which the counseling experience occurs. Interview summaries, detailed analyses, and other relevant counseling experiences are a part of this course. Again, it must be emphasized that Practicum students in 669 must provide forty (40) hours of direct service to clients of which thirty (30) hours take place at a school or agency site and ten (10) hours are provided to non-site clients. With on-site clients, practicum students are to document and describe each individual and group counseling experience, which are to be shared with the cooperating counselor and reflected in the logs given to 
the University professor. These clients are supervised by and remain the primary responsibility of the cooperating counselor. The remaining ten (10) hours with non-site clients are audio recorded and shared only with the University professor and the other students in EDC 669. Practicum students meet in group seminar with the University professor every week. In addition, the University professor provides an hour of individual or triadic supervision (i.e., professor and two students), the time for which is built into this six (6) credit course. 
While the professor and the two students are interacting, the other practicum students observe the supervision being given by the professor. After the triadic supervision occurs, the observing students will be asked to offer their comments and suggestions, immediately after the triadic supervision or during the group class. The appropriate roles of the professional counselor, based upon the Ethical Guidelines of the American Counseling Association, are covered. This course 
is also designed to develop and extend the student’s understanding and competencies begun in 668, Counseling Pre-Practicum. This course must be completed prior to taking EDC 683, Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship I or EDC 690, School Counseling Internship I. Health insurance required for Clinical Mental Health Counseling students.  Hours may not accrue until the signed permission form is submitted to the course professor.
Prerequisite: EDC 668; Pre-requisite or Co-requisite: EDC 610
6 credits
Fall and Spring

EDC 670 Educational Tests and Measurements (SC)
This is a survey course in the principles and practices of testing and assessment used in schools. After a quick look at the concepts of educational statistics, and the underlying mathematical basis of standardized tests, the student will examine the most widely used tests and assessments that he/she will be expected to know and understand in the K-12 setting: achievement tests, interest inventories, aptitude and intelligence measures. In addition, time will be devoted to the New York State Learning Standards, and the assessments which will accompany the higher graduation requirements.
3 credits
Fall only

EDC 676 Career Development (CMHC & SC)
This course provides students with an in-depth study of theories and emerging patterns in career development counseling, as well as their application across a range of settings including schools and agencies. Emphasis is placed on practical counseling techniques, psychoeducational approaches, and evaluation of resources used in 
career counseling and education. Attention is given to psychological, sociological, economic, and educational dynamics; multicultural, gender, and disability perspectives of career development are also discussed. Technological and other current trends as they relate to career counseling and education are reviewed. 
3 credits
Fall and Spring

EDC 683 Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship I (CMHC)

This course is designed for students in the latter part of the graduate 
program, after having taken considerable theory and course work in the counseling process. The student is required to attend seminar meetings, to prepare weekly logs directed toward observation, insight, and evaluation of activities in the field setting. Related professional readings are also required. The student is expected to develop a counseling caseload, participate in group work, attend staff meetings, and meet with the field supervisor for evaluation. A minimum of 300 hours in a mental health counseling setting, acceptable to the department is required. Health insurance required for Clinical Mental Health Counseling students. Hours may not accrue until the signed permission form is submitted to the course professor. Students may not have two sites or two supervisors without the prior approval of the Chair, Department of Counseling and Development.
Prerequisites: EDC 669; Pre-requisite or Co-Requisite EDC 601, 608, 687
3 credits
Fall, Spring and Summer

EDC 684 Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship II (CMHC)
A second semester internship required for clinical mental health counseling students. Course content and time requirements are the same as for EDC 683. A minimum of 300 hours in a mental health setting, approved by the department is required. Health insurance required for Clinical Mental Health Counseling students. Hours may not accrue until the signed permission form is submitted to the course professor. Students may not have two sites or two supervisors without the prior approval of the Chair, Department of Counseling and 
Development.
Prerequisites: EDC 683
Fall, Spring and Summer 
3 credits

EDC 685 Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship III (CMHC)
CMHC Advanced Certificate Only
This course consists of supervised experience involving 300 hours in 
an approved mental health counseling setting. Professional readings are required. However, the student at this level is expected to be self-initiating and able to perform both competently and creatively in considerable depth in achieving the objectives of the course at the practitioner level. Health insurance required for Clinical Mental Health Counseling students. Hours may not accrue until the signed permission form is submitted to the course professor. Students 
may not have two sites or two supervisors without the prior approval of the Chair, Department of Counseling and Development.
3 credits
On Occasion


EDC 686 Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship IV (CMHC)
CMHC Advanced Certificate Only
This course is a continuation of the advanced internship placement and seminar experience as it consists of supervised experience involving 300 hours in an approved mental health counseling setting. Professional readings are required. However, the student at this level is expected to be self-initiating and able to perform both competently and creatively in considerable depth in achieving the objectives of the course at the practitioner level. Health insurance required for Clinical Mental Health Counseling students. Hours may not accrue until the signed permission form is submitted to the course professor. Students may not have two sites or two supervisors without the prior approval of the Chair, Department of Counseling and Development.
Pre requisite of EDC 685
3 credits
On Occasion

EDC 687 Group Counseling: Theory and Practice (CMHC and SC)
This course will examine the dynamics present in a counseling group and how these forces can be employed in the service of therapeutic change. Leadership styles and skills will be discussed with special consideration given to their application and impact on members. The progressive stages in group development will be identified. Concomitant strategies for addressing relevant issues within the stages will be presented. Practical considerations necessary for screening potential members, beginning/ending groups, process interventions, discussing confidentiality and ethical considerations will be included. A variety of theoretical orientations on groups will be explored. This course will also provide students with a practical application of group counseling skills through participation in a group experience.
3 credits
Fall and Spring


EDC 690 School Counseling Internship I (SC)
This course is designed for students in the latter part of the graduate program, after having taken considerable theory and course work in the counseling process. The student is required to attend seminar meetings, to prepare weekly logs directed toward observation, insight, and evaluation of activities in the field setting. Related professional readings are also required. The student is expected to develop a counseling caseload, participate in group work, attend staff meetings, and meet with the field supervisor for evaluation. A minimum of 300 hours in a school setting, acceptable to the department is required. Hours may not accrue until the signed permission form is submitted to the course professor. Students may not have two sites or two supervisors without the prior approval of the Chair, Department of Counseling and Development.
Prerequisites: EDC 669, 659 Prerequisite or Co-requisite: EDC 614; EDC 687
3 credits
Fall only

EDC 691 School Counseling Internship II (SC)
This course consists of supervised experience involving 300 hours in an approved school setting. Course content and time requirements are the same as EDC 690. Hours may not accrue until the signed permission form is submitted to the course professor. Students may not have two sites or two supervisors without the prior approval of the Chair, Department of Counseling and Development.
Prerequisites: EDC 690
3 credits
Spring only

EDC 700 Independent Study (CMHC and SC)
Independent study involves in-depth development of a project idea as an area of study in a previous course. Permission to take this course is based on the merit of the proposed study and the needs and background of the student. Permission requires the signature of the faculty member sponsoring the study, the Department Chair, and the Dean of the College of Education, Information and Technology at LIU Post. Independent study is not allowed in place of a course offered as part of the program. Hours are arranged. Offered on Rotation
1, 2, or 3 credits
On Occasion

EDC 702 Research Methods in Counseling (CMHC and SC)
This is a course in the understanding of the use, process, and applications of research findings in counseling. Students will examine recent research studies, explore topics of particular interest to them, and prepare a draft research proposal on an issue of their choosing. This course is project based, relevant, and practical.
3 credits
Fall and Spring

EDC 750 Special Topics in Counseling (Elective)
Summer Session institutes and workshops are three-credit courses, one week in length, designed to enrich one’s graduate or post-graduate education by focusing on topics that are of timely interest and concern to working professionals. Often institutes are team-taught by experts in their field, offering students a unique opportunity 
to accelerate their academic progress for personal, professional and career advancement. All courses are open to visiting students and working professionals.
• The Adolescent in Crisis: Detection, Intervention and Referral
• Cognitive-Behavior Therapy (CBT): Theory, Practice and Techniques
• Counseling the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual or Transgender Client/Student
• Grief Counseling with Clients Facing Dying, Death, Bereavement, Trauma and Loss
• Helping Parents Help Their Children: Practical Strategies for LMHC Practitioners and School Support Personnel
• Spirituality in Counseling and Psychotherapy: A Dimension of Integrative Healing
3 credits
Rotating basis Summer only


Advance Certificate Clinical Mental Health Counseling Admissions Requirements

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

This is a licensure-qualifying bridge program approved by the New York State Education Department. In order to be admitted to the program, students must have a master's degree in school counseling or other related counseling degree with a minimum of 48 credits in specified core educational content areas as delineated in state regulations for mental health counselor licensure. Individuals who graduated from a program of fewer than 48 credits will be required to take additional coursework above the 15 credits to ensure meeting the state requirement of a minimum of 60 graduate credits. Upon application candidates will have their transcript(s) reviewed by the department to ascertain the needed number of graduate credits required for the advanced certificate.

Applicants to the Advanced Certificate in Clinical Mental Health Counseling must meet the following requirements for admission. 
  • Application for Admission
  • Application fee: $50 (non-refundable)
  • Official copies of graduate transcripts from any college(s) or universities you have attended.
  • Applicants must have graduated in good standing with an M.S. in School Counseling or related counseling degree from an accredited institution of higher learning with a minimum of 48 credits in specified core educational content areas as required by New York State mental health counselor licensure. Applicants with a master's degree in school counseling, or other related counseling degree of less than 48 credits will be required to take additional coursework beyond the 15 credits to earn the advanced certificate.
  • Personal Statement that addresses the reason you are interested in pursuing graduate work in this area of study.
Applicants must show evidence of good character; e.g. no ethical misconduct or legal history that would adversely impact professional conduct
The Department of Counseling and Development reserves the right to require a departmental interview with a faculty member if warranted after completion of the departmental review of the applicant's graduate transcript.

Send application materials to: 
LIU Post
Graduate Admissions Processing Center
15 Dan Road, Ste. 102
Canton, MA 02021

Advance Certificate Clinical Mental Health Counseling

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The Advanced Certificate in Clinical Mental Health Counseling requires each candidate to take the following courses at a minimum: 
• EDC 601 Foundations of Clinical Mental Health Counseling and Ethics 
• EDC 608 Assessment and Intervention Strategies in Clinical Mental Health Counseling 
• EDC 616 Family Counseling 
• EDC 683 Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship I (300 hours) 
• EDC 684 Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship II (300 hours)



Contact Us

Counseling and Development Faculty and Administration


Faculty

Dr.Eugene Goldin
Eugene Goldin earned his Ed.D. in Counseling from St. John's University in 1987. He graduated from The Ackerman Institute for the Family's Clinical Externship Program in 1991. Prior to coming to LIU-Post in 1994, he was a Director of Counseling at New York Institute of Technology. He is a Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor and a Licensed Marital and Family Therapy. Dr. Goldin has expanded his professional interests by integrating Yoga and Mindfulness Meditation into Counseling Practice.

Dr.James J. Colangelo
Mental Health Counseling, Marriage and Family Therapy, Sex Therapy, Hypnosis and Hypnotherapy

Dr. Jonathan Procter 
Dr. Jonathan Procter earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Family Studies from Ohio University, his Master of Science in Behavior Analysis from Swansea University in Wales, and his Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision from Ohio University.  His dissertation explored the impact Religious Fundamentalism plays within counselor trainee’s development of multicultural counseling competencies and empathy towards the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) communities in master level counseling students.

Dr. June Ann Smith
Dr. June Ann Smith, Ph.D., LMHC, LMFT, NCC, LCSW-R, ACS - Associate Professor of Education. Dr. Smith earned her Ph.D. in counseling and human services from Andrews University, Michigan. In addition, she holds an M.S.W. degree from Yeshiva University, New York. She served as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Counseling, Research, Special Education, and Rehabilitation, Hofstra University before coming to LIU Post. In addition, she worked as Director of Educational Services at Grand Street Settlement, a Social Services Agency, on the lower East side, Manhattan, where she worked in collaboration with the Department of Education of New York State and United Way of New York City. Over 10 years in this role, she managed and implement drop out prevention programs in several New York City High Schools in Brooklyn and Manhattan.

Dr.Kathleen Keefe-Cooperman
Kathleen Keefe-Cooperman received an undergraduate degree in psychology from Rhode Island College, a master’s degree in counseling from Pace University, and another master’s degree in the area of clinical practices in psychology from the University of Hartford, where she also received a doctorate in clinical psychology.Dr. Keefe-Cooperman is a licensed New York State Psychologist who is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Counseling and Development.  She first taught as an adjunct for LIU at the West Point site before becoming director for the counseling programs at the Rockland Graduate Campus for five years. This professor then moved to the LIU Post campus in 2009. She greatly enjoys being part of the larger campus, and provides supervision for Psy. D. students performing psychological evaluations. Dr. Keefe-Cooperman is active in the fields of counseling and psychology. She is chair for the Diversity Subcommittee for the Teaching of Psychology Division of APA. The psychologist also specializes in the psychological evaluations of children and adolescents.

Dr. Kristin Schaefer-Schiumo
Dr. Kristin Schaefer-Schiumo is a tenured professor in the Department of Counseling and Development at LIU, Post. A proud recipient of Long Island University’s prestigious David Newton Award for Teaching Excellence, she previously taught in Long Island University’s Tactical Officers’ Education Program at the United States Military Academy at West Point and is a former assistant professor in the Department of Human Development and Leadership at LIU, Brooklyn. Dr. Schaefer-Schiumo served as the coordinator for coalition enhancement for a $300,000 grant offered through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Association (SAMHSA), where she wrote grants contributing to the further funding of a school-based violence prevention initiative. She has had extensive clinical experience working in hospital, community, and university-based settings with child, adolescent, and adult populations.

Dr. Paul J. Ciborowski
Dr. Paul J. Ciborowski is an associate professor in the department. He has been a faculty member for 30 years. Dr. Ciborowski graduated from New York University with a MA degree and received his PhD from Fordham University.Dr. Ciborowski is currently pursuing his interest in diversity counseling particularly as it relates to training counselors who will be working with Muslim youth. There are many serious misunderstandings regarding this minority group that counseling may help to assuage.Dr. Ciborowski is also active with the counseling honor society - Lambda Iota Beta. He is the faculty advisor to the Brentwood chapter. 

Susan Shenker
Professor Shenker received an M.A. from Teachers College, Columbia University, in higher education administration, student personnel administration and counseling.  From her first position as a counselor at Baruch College, she rose in the ranks to become a Dean at LaGuardia Community College, and Vice President for Administration and Planning at Borough of Manhattan Community College.  Among her accomplishments while at CUNY is the establishment of International High School, a model for the teaching of English as a Second Language.Professor Shenker served as a Trustee of Arcadia University, the Chairperson of the Queens Lighthouse for the Blind, and a Board Member of the Lighthouse International.  She has been the author and chief investigator for millions of dollars of competitive grant funding and the recipient of numerous awards from the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education.Professor Shenker was a founding member of the editorial board of the scholarly, refereed, quarterly academic journal Excelsior: Leadership in Teaching and Learning.  Her current research is in the areas of counselor education and developing a model for increasing parent participation in children’s education. Papers on these topics have been published in Educational Studies and Professional School Counseling.

Dr. Terry Bordan
Dr. Terry Bordan, a national certified counselor, certified clinical mental health counselor, licensed professional counselor, approved clinical supervisor and licensed mental health counselor is a full professor and the former Chair in the graduate Department of Counseling and Development at the C.W. Post and Brentwood campuses of Long Island University.  She has taught in Long Island University’s Tactical Officers’ Education Program at the United States Military Academy at West Point and is the former Director of Counseling at the United States Merchant Marine Academy.  Dr. Bordan is the former Vice-President for Professional Services of the New York State Counseling Association and the past Editor of its award winning refereed journal, The Journal for the Professional Counselor as well as a former member of the editorial review board for the American Counseling Association’s flagship publication, The Journal of Counseling and Development.  Dr. Bordan is the recipient of that organization’s Patterson Award for distinguished service to the counseling profession.  She is the author of numerous journal publications and is a presenter at workshops and seminars at the state, regional, and national levels.  She is the co-author, along with poker superstar Andy Bloch and Dr. Kristin Schaefer-Schuimo of  Life Lessons:  Hold’Em Poker Style., has extensive clinical experience as a private mental health practitioner along with being featured in The New York Times and Newsday.Dr. Bordan has appeared on several television shows and is the former host of her own radio show, “Dr. Terry Bordan and Co.” on WCWP-FM, the CW Post radio station and is the former co-host of “Here’s to Your Health” on WNYG-AM, a metropolitan New York City station.  Dr. Bordan is the recipient of Long Island University’s  2001 David Newton Award for Teaching Excellence and the 2005 Carolyn S. Hewson Award for Distinguished Service to Counselor Education. 


Administration

Jane Janas
Secretary 
Phone: 516-299-2671
Email: jane.janas@liu.edu

Miriam (Mimi) McCormack
Clinical Placement Coordinator
Email: Miriam.McCormack@liu.edu

Daniel Heller
Academic Counselor-LIU Post
Phone: 516- 299-2183
Email: daniel.heller@liu.edu

Isaac Yadegari 
Academic Counselor-LIU Brentwood 
Phone: 631-287-8507
Email: Isaac.Yadegari@liu.edu

CACREP Liaison



CONTACT

College of Education, Information, and Technology
Dr. Albert Inserra, Dean
516-299-2210

post-educate@liu.edu