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Course Descriptions

Courses in the 500 series are open to upper level undergraduates provided prerequisites are met or instructor's permission is granted. Upper level (700) LIS courses are open to masters and Ph.D. students. 800 level courses are only for doctoral students.

Master's Level Required Courses

LIS 510 Introduction to Library & Information Science

An overview of the field. Introduction to the history, purpose, functions, and processes of the field, its place in society, practice of the profession in various types of settings, and current issues and trends.
Every Semester
3 credits

LIS 511 Information Sources and Services

Philosophy, process, and techniques of information services. Overview of information access and delivery, types of resources and formats used in information services, evaluation and measurement of sources and services, and information seeking processes and behaviors.
Every Semester
3 credits

LIS 512 Introduction to Knowledge Organization

Basic principles of bibliographic control. Emphasizes understanding the function of catalogs, indexes, bibliographies, Web-browsers and acquiring the ability to use and interpret these tools effectively. Introduction to bibliographic utilities, online catalogs and indexes, world wide web, metadata and the Dublin Core, MARC formats, Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules, Library of Congress Subject Headings, Sears List of Subject Headings, Dewey Decimal Classification, Library of Congress Classification.
Pre- or co-requisites: LIS 510
Fall and Spring
3 credits

LIS 514 Introduction to Research in Library and Information Science

Theoretical and applied research design, methodologies, and evaluations in library and information science. Review of existing research in the field, techniques of proposal preparation, and design of instruments used in the field.
Pre- or co-requisites: LIS 510
Every Semester
3 credits

LIS 690 Internship

120 hours during a semester at an approved site, working under supervision of a professional in the field. Guided by a Learning Contract jointly approved by faculty and the site supervisor, students augment what they have been taught in formal courses, further their career objectives, and enhance their skills, competencies, and abilities. The internship should be one of the student's final classes normally taken after completing 28 credits. For students with extensive library experience, LIS 695 (Masters Project) is available as an alternative to the internship, with permission from the student's advisor and Dean.
Prerequisites: LIS 510, LIS 511, LIS 512, LIS 514, and most electives.
Every Semester
3 credits

LIS 691 Internship/Student Teaching (for School Library certification candidates)

240 hours or 40 days is the required time for student teaching. This must be split between elementary school (120 hours or 20 days) and secondary school (120 hours or 20 days). Secondary school is de-fined as either a middle school or a high school. It is the student's responsibility to choose the sites, with the guidance of the Director of the School Library program. Sites must be approved by the Director. Students will develop a learning contract which will govern this experience and must have a formal teaching observation. Students will be expected to put the theory or principles they have learned during their coursework into practice. 3 credits.
Prerequisites: LIS 510, 512, 514; LIS 620, 622, 626, 628, 629, 712 OR permission of the Director of the School Library program.
Fall and Spring 

Master's Level Electives

LIS 508 Technology for Information Management

A comprehensive introduction to digital and communications technologies as the underpinnings for information storage and retrieval systems. These include the theory of digital representation of information (text, graphical images, and sound), the inter-relationship of hardware, operating system software and applications software in stand-alone systems, and extensions of these in networked environments.
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 513 Management of Libraries and Information Centers

Principles and techniques of management applicable to libraries and information service organizations. Focuses management theory on organizing for library and information services, collections, facilities management, and measurement and evaluation of services.
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 516 Collection Development

Students will examine the principles, issues and best practices related to the development of a library collection serving an academic or research community in a college, university, public or special library environment. This course will consider methods for identifying the needs of a user community, designing a collection policy, selecting and acquiring library materials in all formats, making decisions related to a collection's management and preservation, and evaluating the quality and appropriateness of an existing collection.
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 517 Emerging Web Technologies

With the advent of new web technologies, an explosion of new social software tools has emerged enabling users to create, organize, share, and collaborate in an online space. Today's Web users are organizing their favorite bookmarks, collaborating on shared documents, cataloging their personal collections, and sharing their information with others. This course will explore the features and functionality of emerging web technologies such as blogs, wikis, RSS, social bookmarking, media sharing, tagging, folksonomies and more. This course will look at how libraries are implementing these various tools as well as their potential uses.
Spring
3 credits

LIS 519 Great Collections of New York City

This course introduces students to issues surrounding the curation of special collections in
architecturally or historically significant physical spaces in New York City. It does so through guided visits to repositories representing a range of historical types of libraries. During the course of these visits, students will see spectacular examples from major collections, become aware of the contexts of these collections, and develop an understanding of the “sense of place” associated with each collection. Their own observations will be enriched by the explanations of curators about opportunities and limitations of these special settings in regard to collection care, preservation, and services.
Prerequisite: LIS 510
Summer
3 credits

LIS 520 Records Management I: Fundamentals

Introduction to the systematic management of business records. Topics covered include: inventorying records, preparation of retention schedules, space management for inactive records, micrographics, protection of vital records, and file organization concepts.
Fall
3 credits

LIS 602  Children's Literature, Emotional Intelligence and the Moral Imagination

Sharing stories and Books is an important part of helping children understand themselves, other people and the world in which they live.  Books enhance a child's facility with language and help children identify and express feelings.  Students will explore different literary genres and story formats in their relation to emotional IQ and moral imagination. A thematic approach will address issues such as:  violence, conflict resolution, cooperation, and tolerance as well as specific character traits such as:  courage, integrity, playfulness, empathy, generosity, honesty, and resilience.  Students will develop their own criteria and strategies for evaluating material. 
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 603 Humanities Sources and Services

A study of the nature of the knowledge, historical development, research, and publications in the humanities. Includes the identification and evaluation of bibliographic, reference, and selection sources in philosophy, religion, language, fine arts, minor and applied arts, performing arts, music, and world literature.
Prerequisite: LIS 511
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 604 Science and Technology Sources and Services

A study of the background, trends, terminology, and notable publications in the physical and biological sciences, engineering, and technology. Special consideration is given to the forms taken by scientific literature, bibliographic, selection, and reference sources. The needs of the user of various types of libraries are emphasized.
Prerequisite: LIS 511
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 605 Social Science Sources and Services

An examination of trends, terminology, and notable works in history, geography, political science, law, education, psychology, economics, business sociology, anthropology, and social sciences. A consideration for the form taken by social science literature. A study of bibliographic, reference, and selection tools in print and electronic formats.
Prerequisites: LIS 511
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 607 Health Science Sources and Services

Examines health science reference tools, both print and electronic. Includes study of the National Library of Medicine, and health science professional organizations and their publications. Specific attention is given to access to Medline through PubMed. The literature and resources for consumer health information, medical terminology, and Internet resources will be explored.
Prerequisite: LIS 511
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 608 Legal Sources and Services

Provides an overview of the tools and techniques of legal research. Students are introduced to the structure and processes of the three major components of the legal system in the United States: common law, statutes, and administrative law. Sources of foreign and international law are examined.
Prerequisite: LIS 511
Summer
3 credits

LIS 609 Business & Economics Sources & Services

Examines business and economic fields, their literature and research, and the various settings and environments of business and economic research, for the U.S., with some attention to international needs. Includes collection development and services, general reference sources, statistical, bibliographic, government documents, periodicals, associations, etc., in print and electronic form, and techniques for using them. Also covers specific client groups, ethics, management, and current issues.
Prerequisite: LIS 511
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 611 Film & Media Collections

This course will provide an introduction to building and maintaining collections and services related to visual media, primarily moving image, sound and ephemera. Discussions will survey key components such as the history of film and media in library collections, collection development, access, equipment, copyright, emerging technologies and management of non-print formats
Summer
3 credits

LIS 612 Art Librarianship

Students will be introduced to all aspects of art librarianship, with an emphasis on reference and collection development issues. Field trips will supplement in-class lectures, exercises, and hands-on practice with print sources and databases for art, architecture, and design research.
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 616 Contemporary Artists' Books

This course will investigate the work of artists books and what it means to build a collection in this genre. Historical precedents and contexts in the art world will be explored. The practical side of the field will be examined; the marketplace, dealers and business ethics. Also, the logistics of stewardship over this special genera of books will be studies:  housing, preservation cataloging, promotions and access.
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 618 Online Information Retrieval Techniques

A survey of the design and use of computerized information retrieval systems and services, including online catalogs, commercial database searches, and Internet-based search services and electronic resources. The emphasis will be on acquiring a practical understanding of these systems and services to aid in the development of advanced search, selection, and evaluation competencies. The course will include the application of search strategies and techniques to all types of formats of electronic resources, including bibliographic, full-text, and multimedia resources. Instructional methods include lecture, online demonstrations, and hands-on training.
Prerequisites: LIS 510 & LIS 511 or instructor approval
Spring
3 credits

LIS 620 Instructional Design and Leadership

Examines the curriculum consultant and instructional leadership roles of the school media specialist. Attention is given to the history of curriculum design and delivery systems, and opportunities are provided for students to blend recent developments in curriculum and instruction with information literacy objectives and staff development strategies. Presentation and discussion of appropriate techniques dealing with students having special needs and disabilities and accommodating inclusion children in the library media center. Collaborative, interdisciplinary approaches are emphasized. For information specialists, supervisors, administrators, and others involved in the teaching/learning process.
There will be 25 hours of field experiences (observation) related to coursework as part of the
requirement in SED 52.21 (b) (3) (i). A total of 100 hours of observation must be completed prior to student teaching or practica (internship).
Prerequisites: LIS 510 & LIS 511 or instructor approval
Fall and Spring

3 credits

LIS 622 Management of the School Media Center

An examination of developments in the principles and strategies for managing information and school information centers. This course examines philosophies and practices related to policy development, budgeting, personnel, resource organization, networking, public relations, and facilities planning including examination of facilities for persons with disabilities and special needs. There will be 25 hours of field experiences (observation) related to coursework as part of the requirement in SED 52.21 (b) (3) (i). A total of 100 hours of observation must be completed prior to student teaching or practica (internship).
Prerequisites: LIS 510 & LIS 511 or instructor approval
Fall and Spring
3 credits

LIS 624 Introduction to Online Teaching

Students will learn about historical and current trends and learning theories in online learning. Students will explore the online learning environment through applying instructional design, planning online activities, copyright and intellectual property, assessment of online learners, understanding social learning, collaboration tools, and classroom management.
Prerequisites: LIS 510 & LIS 620 or instructor approval
Fall
3 credits

LIS 626 Teaching Methodologies for School Media Specialists

This course will present teaching strategies important for the school media specialist in the school library information center “classroom.” Learn and practice techniques for using the school information center as a vital part of the instruction occurring within the school. Lesson planning, questioning strategies, and hands-on practice with important educational trends are integral components of this course.
Prerequisites: LIS 510 & LIS 511 & LIS 620 or instructor approval
Summer
3 credits

LIS 628 School Media Materials and the Curriculum

Survey of nonfiction resources in support of the subject content areas in the modern school curriculum including non-fiction materials covering persons with disabilities and special needs. Attention is given to new developments in the curriculum, with emphasis on the whole language approach as it relates to the selections and use of library materials.
Prerequisites: LIS 510 & LIS 511 or instructor approval
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 629 Integrating Technology into the School Media Curriculum

Students will examine software, hardware, Internet utilities, and web sites to see how curriculum and technology facilitate learning in the school media center; explore the ways hardware and software should be integrated in the curriculum, including examination of age appropriate material for children with disabilities and special needs, and use of adaptive technology.
There will be 25 hours of field experiences (observation) related to coursework as part of the
requirement in SED 52.21 (b) (3) (i). A total of 100 hours of observation must be completed prior to student teaching or practica internship).
Prerequisites: LIS 510 & LIS 511 or instructor approval
Fall and Spring
3 credits

LIS 650 Basic Web Design

This courses introduces students to the fundamentals of designing, building and maintaining passive websites. Passive web sites are those that do not change appearance as a result of user interaction. Students will learn and apply website technologies such as XHTML (the Hypertext Markup Language using XML syntax) and CSS (Cascading Style Sheets). Students will be introduced to the web site architecture and website design literature as far as they are relevant for passive web sites. Some fundamental aspects of the web such as http and URLs will also be addressed.
Fall
3 credits

LIS 651 Advanced Web Design

This courses introduces students to the fundamentals of designing, building and maintaining active web sites. Active web sites are those that do change appearance as a result of user interaction. For example, the user may point the mouse at a picture and the pictures changes. Or the user may file a request using a form and a response is given by the server. Students will learn and apply server-side technologies such as PHP (the PHP Hypertext Processor) and client-side technologies such as Javascript. Students will be introduced to the web site architecture and web site design literature as far as they are relevant for active web sites.
Prerequisites: LIS 650 or instructor approval
Spring
3 credits

LIS 652 Exhibitions and Catalogs: Library Meets Museum

While this course considers theoretical issues of conceptualization and criticism, it essentially provides practical, hands-on, experience with the steps necessary to create a successful exhibition of rare book/special collections material. Major topics are planning, implementation, evaluation, and documentation. The course is appropriate for students who are preparing for curatorial careers in rare book / special collections units.
Prerequisites: LIS 510
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 654 Building Digital Libraries

Designed especially for students intending to work with original research materials of cultural interest such as photographs, manuscripts, and printed ephemera, this course introduces the processes of digitizing these materials for wider public access. Covered are these topics: local and international contexts, implementation, management issues, special collections concerns, technical processes and issues, best practices and standards, marketing, use, evaluation, pedagogy, planning, and prediction. No one, of course, can ever have a full command of this rapidly changing area. "Learning to learn" is a more useful goal than learning "to know" in this area. Reacting to the dynamic and collaborative nature of this work, students will gain experience in finding and evaluating information materials on demand, and in "packaging" this information suitably for their colleagues. Applying their skills, they will also create actual micro-digital libraries representing cultural materials.
Prerequisite: LIS 512
3 credits

LIS 657 Introduction to Preservation

An introduction to the principles and practices of library and archives preservation. Current
preservation methods, national, regional, and local preservation efforts, the history of preservation, and disaster planning and recovery will be examined.
Spring
3 credits

LIS 658 History of the Book

Students in this course become acquainted with recognized icons of the western book and with theoretical approaches to interpreting “the book” in its broadest sense. They gain first-hand experience with the intellectual tools of the book historian's trade including vocabulary, bibliography in its various manifestations, sources, and major collections and related bibliographic institutions.
Prerequisite: LIS 510 or LIS 511
Fall
3 credits

LIS 662 Library Public Relations

Examines the principles and practice of public relations; the library image; the news media; special events and programs; exhibits and displays; library publications; publicity; marketing techniques; and discussion of public relations as it applies to all types of libraries.
Prerequisites: LIS 510
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 669 Government Information Resources

Study and evaluation of documents and information from federal, state, and municipal sources, including international governments. Most emphasis on the U.S. The nature of documents, electronic formats (databases, CD-ROMs) their reference and research value, as well as selection, acquisition, organization, and access in various settings.
Prerequisite: LIS 510 & LIS 511 or instructor approval
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 695 Master's Project

Available for students with extensive library experience as an alternative to LIS 690 (Internship).
Independent research, design, or development that may include one of the following: a research paper of publishable quality; an instructional or informational design program; a creative performance program. The student will be required to present a proposal for approval as well as the completed results of the selected paper or program project to the faculty advisor, project supervisor, and the dean.
Prerequisite: LIS 510 & LIS 511 & LIS 512 & LIS 514 and Director's approval
Every Semester
3 credits

LIS 697 Master's Thesis

Independent research for the preparation, development, and presentation of a master's thesis under a faculty member's advisement and supervision. The completed thesis must be approved by the thesis advisor and the Dean.
Prerequisites: LIS 510 & LIS 511 & LIS 512 & LIS 514 and Director's approval
Every Semester
3 credits

LIS 699 Independent Study

Through independent study, students may explore in depth areas in the field that are of particular interest. A student will be limited to two independent studies during their course of study. For further information contact the Academic Counselor.
Prerequisites: LIS 510 & LIS 511 & LIS 512 and Director's approval
Every Semester
3 credits

LIS 705 Principles and Practices in Archival Description: DACS/EAD

Explores the principles of archival description as expressed in Describing Archives: A Content
Standard. Implementation of those principles through Encoded Archival Description (EAD) and
MARC structures will form the largest portion of the semester. Other practices will include authority and subject analysis work. Other topics, issues, and technologies include related standards, the history and development of archival description, the uses of description, and description for special formats. The course consists of lectures, discussion and hands-on exercises, culminating in an EAD and DACS-based analysis of existing finding aids.
Summer
3 Credits

LIS 706 Digital Preservation

An introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of the preservation of digital records. The course begins with an overview of the issues facing institutions trying to preserve digital records. It then turns to a review of the many preservation initiatives underway worldwide. Finally, it focuses on practical considerations in implementing a digital preservation program.
On Occasion
3 Credits

LIS 707 Human-Computer Interaction (HCI)

Overview of foundations, interaction design and evaluation techniques in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), a discipline concerned with understanding user needs, designing and evaluating an interactive system from a user-centered perspective. This course will focus on the human perspective of computing by examining how people perceive, process, remember, utilize, share and communicate about information in work and non-work situations; and how interaction technologies can take these human issues into account. Focusing on library systems and services as examples for evaluation, students will acquire practical skills in collecting patron/user needs and evaluating website/system design, including usability testing, persona design, card sorting, heuristic evaluation, cognitive walkthrough, and more.
On Occasion
3 Credits

LIS 710 Rare Books School (RBS)

Students may take up to two (2) courses in the University of Virginia's Rare Book School as part of this concentration. This option must be approved by the Palmer School before the student enrolls in the RBS program. See the RBS website for current course selections: www.rarebookschool.org.
Permission Required
Fall and Spring

LIS 712 Literacy for K-12 Environments

This course will develop understanding of the complexity of literacy for K-12 learners. Linguistic aspects (vocabulary, grammar, genre and text structure), cognitive and metacognitive behaviors (reading strategies), and socio-cultural context (beliefs and attitudes of non-English learners) will be examined as influences on a learner's development of literacy. This course will provide school and children's librarians with background knowledge of the various issues relevant to literacy instruction. Special emphasis will be given to strategies to use for students with disabilities. Reading motivation and strategies to incorporate technology into literacy learning will be discussed.
Summer
3 credits

LIS 713 Rare Books and Special Collections Librarianship

Examines the characteristics, criteria, and appraisal of book materials. Historical background,
principles, and practice of rare book librarianship. The organization, administration, collection
building, maintenance, preservation, exhibition, publication, special problems, and use of rare books in all settings.
Prerequisites: LIS 510 or LIS 512
Fall
3 credits

LIS 714 Archives and Manuscripts

Identification, preservation, and use of archival materials. Emphasis on the organization and
administration of archival collections and departments of archives in various types of institutions.
Fall
3 credits

LIS 716 Audio Preservation

The purpose of the course is to explore the issues related to the preservation of audio materials, both in legacy formats and in current of future or digital forms.  Students will be able to identify audio formats found in a library or archive.  They will be knowledgeable about the fragility and obsolescence issues pertaining to preservation and access of audio formats.
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 718  Facilitating Online Learning

Students will learn about concepts, strategies, and research for developing and facilitating an online learning community.  Students will explore both asynchronous and synchronous tools while designing online activities based on best practices.  Topics include understanding the role of the online facilitator, designing online coursework while creating a sense of presence, engaging learners in an online environment, constructing activities to engage online learners, and assessing online engaged learning.
Spring
3 Credits

LIS 721 Appraisal of Archives and Manuscripts

Discusses classic archival appraisal theory and recent refinements, including documentation strategies. Relates appraisal to the mission, goals, and objectives of an archival institution. Explores the Applicability of appraisal theory to records on media other than print.
Prerequisite: LIS 714 or instructor approval
Spring
3 credits

LIS 722 Electronic Records

In-depth examination of electronic records management implications and applications. Topics include: document imaging systems, document management systems, inventorying and retention of electronic records, preservation of electronic records, and protection of vital electronic records.
Spring
3 credits

LIS 728 K-12 Literature for School Media Specialists

A survey course covering various genres, styles, authors, illustrators and trends with emphasis on the role of literature in the school library media center. Students will consider methods of selecting and evaluating children's and young adult literature in terms of readability and interest level and several ways in which the titles can be integrated as the content and vehicle to master the Core Curriculum. Through class discussions and constructing lessons, students will explore a range of topics related to literature, including booktalks, author studies, read-aloud techniques and book discussion groups.
Summer
3 Credits

LIS 729 Young Adults Sources and Services

A survey of adolescents and their reading with special emphasis on books written especially for this age group (12-18). The readings will include material emphasizing multi cultural characters and settings, and bibliotherapy including stories of persons with disabilities and special needs. Students will attain skills in providing library services for the young adult population, including information and referral. Programming, applying new technology advocacy, working with professional staff and administration, partnering with parents and community, school and public library cooperative projects, publicity, evaluation of literature and techniques for introducing literature to the adolescent population. The course requires reading of text, reading and discussion or a number of young adult titles in a variety of genres, small group presentations, oral presentations and bibliography.
Prerequisites: LIS 510 & LIS 511
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 731 Materials and Services for Early Childhood

Materials and services for the young child, viewed from a library perspective. Discussion of underlying theories such as services and development of appropriate programs including presentation of age appropriate material for children with disabilities and special needs, use of adaptive toys and equipment and material. Emphasis on books---their selection, analysis, and presentation, with attention to other materials, e.g., oral tradition, recorded materials, toys and puppets.
Prerequisite: LIS 510 & LIS 511
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 733 Children's Sources & Services

A survey of literature for children of preschool through elementary school age (pre-K to 11 years) with emphasis on the literary quality and characteristics of fictional and biographical materials. The survey will include materials emphasizing multicultural characters and settings and bibliotherapy including stories of persons with disabilities and special needs. Issues and problems of bringing books to children are also discussed.
Prerequisites: LIS 510 & LIS 511
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 735 Storytelling & Folk Literature

Analysis and evaluation of folk literature and epic tales as revelation of the culture of various people. This course emphasizes the art, techniques, and practices of oral presentation as a medium of communication and appreciation of literature.
Prerequisite: LIS 510 & LIS 511 or instructor approval
Summer
3 credits

LIS 736 Techniques in Storytelling

This course is appropriate for all students who wish to improve their skills in the arts of storytelling and other types of oral presentation. The skills being developed are adaptable for a variety of communication situations, from presentations to business groups, through the telling of stories to audiences of all ages, to teaching, including teaching children to tell stories.
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 737 Serving Diverse Populations

A seminar on services for multi-cultural populations and groups with special interests or needs: Sensory or mobility-impaired; learning disabilities; adult beginning readers; English as a second-language; gifted and talented; latchkey children; homeless, aging, etc. Covers Federal Regulations, materials, professional attitudes, techniques, equipment and programs, at all levels and settings.
Prerequisites: LIS 510 & LIS 511
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 739 Myth and the Age of Information

A seminar on the role of myth and storytelling in modern settings within diverse contexts such as management, marketing, psychology, politics, anthropology, literature, broadcast media and popular culture, multi-cultural education and religion. Covers the benefits and pitfalls of using story in different types of settings and the role of the information-based institution.
Summer
3 credits

LIS 741 Public Libraries

A study of the philosophy, background, function, and place of public libraries in contemporary society. Examines the principles and techniques of public library organization, planning, operation, resources, services and facilities, as well as how to identify and serve groups and organizations in a community. Study of present condition, trends, and issues. Emphasis on public service orientation.
Prerequisites: LIS 510 & LIS 511 & LIS 512 or instructor approval
Spring
3 credits

LIS 745 Academic Libraries

A study of the place and function of the academic library within the parent organization with particular concern for library needs of students and faculty. Includes organization & administration, policymaking regarding collections, access, organization, facilities, services, personnel, budget, and finance. Attention is given to higher education, relevant networks, and external influences.
Prerequisites: LIS 510 & LIS 511 & LIS 512 or instructor approval
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 747 Special Libraries

A study of the historical development and characteristics of a variety of special libraries. Organization, administration, and function within their parent organizations; problems and solutions associated with planning, collections, services, personnel, facilities, budgets, and evaluation are covered. Emphasis is on information centers, networks, the Special Libraries Association, and related organizations.
Prerequisites: LIS 510 & LIS 511 or instructor approval
Spring
3 credits

LIS 749 Health Sciences Libraries

An overview of the services and programs of health sciences libraries. The principles and techniques of administration and management will be discussed with emphasis on the selection and organization of collections, budgeting, facilities, staffing, and evaluation.
Prerequisites: LIS 510 & LIS 511 & LIS 512 or instructor approval
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 755 Information Technologies and Society

A study of the history of technologies of information and communication and their social impact. The course examines the evolution of several technologies, such as writing, the printing press, film, digitization, and their social and cultural context. The course also explores the development of the Internet and its current potential impact on social, economic, political and cultural structures.
Prerequisite: LIS 510 or instructor approval
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 763 Metadata for Digital Libraries

Application of standards and rules to the construction of tools for information retrieval, primarily web resources and catalogs in library and information environments. Overview of concepts of knowledge organization and of meta-data applications. Special problems in the organization of resources (archival and library materials in various forms, internet resources). Includes metadata formats, descriptive detail for different forms of material; choice and form of entry for names and uniform titles; provision of authority control for names and titles.
Prerequisites: LIS 510 & LIS 512
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 765 Knowledge Representation

Theory of subject analysis, vocabulary control and classification. Comparison and use of Dewey Decimal Classification, Library of Congress Classification, Library of Congress Subject Headings. PRECIS, Art & Architecture Thesaurus. Introduction to Universal Decimal Classification, Colon Classification, Medical Subject Headings, and other systems.
Prerequisites: LIS 510 & LIS 512
On Occasion
3 credits

LIS 768 Digital Information Representation

Principles and concepts of abstracting and indexing methods in the context of manual and computer based information retrieval systems. Includes preparation of abstracts, subject analysis and vocabulary control, thesaurus construction, and computer assisted indexing. Evaluation of indexing and retrieval systems.
Prerequisites: LIS 510 & LIS 512
Spring
3 credits

LIS 770 Information Systems and Retrieval

Fundamentals of information retrieval systems, including structures, design and implementation, are covered. Also discussed are language, information and query representation, techniques, approaches, the human dimension, and evaluation in information retrieval along with a brief survey of advances and research in the field.
Prerequisite: LIS 510 or instructor approval
Fall
3 credits

LIS 781 WISE Consortium

As a member of the WISE (Web-based Information Science Education) consortium of schools, we are pleased to announce the addition of WISE course offerings to our students.  These online courses are taught by faculty from WISE host schools using course management systems specific to their environment and academic calendar.  WISE courses afford students the opportunity to take electives of interest at other WISE schools, exposing them to a wide array of faculty and students, without having to transfer credits.  Students should note the varying delivery methods and academic calendars among WISE schools.  For more information visit the WISE website at www.wiseeducation.org.
WISE Application Required
Every Semester

LIS 785 Mentoring Experience

Mentees are assigned a mentor from the NYU Libraries as soon as they are accepted into the dual-degree program.  Mentors and mentees will then work together to develop an initial learning contract which is reviewed each semester.  On occasion, part of the mentorship may be completed at an off-site library approved by the Mentor and members of the Mentoring Committee.  The mentorship of 160 hours may be completed at any time before graduation from both Masters programs.
Open only to Dual-Degree Students
Fall
4 credits

LIS 901  Special Topics

A special topic not covered in the regular curriculum is explored in depth.
3 credits.  Effective Fall 2011, Students are limited to 6 credits of 901 courses, absent permission of the Palmer School Director.