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Graduate Course Offerings

Requirements

ENG 710 Research and Criticism

This course will help you become a better researcher, critical thinker, and writer. We will explore various strategies for producing a well-written, substantive research paper, and this process will include assignments designed to strengthen your skills in public speaking and group collaboration. What are the most effective ways to research a topic? Where can you find useful secondary sources? How can a richer understanding of cultural history enhance your interpretation of literary texts? How do you craft and develop an original argument for a research paper? What are the most effective strategies for revision and rewriting? As the last question suggests, this course will emphasize the process of revision as central to the construction of effective writing. The assignments will also be geared toward professionalization within the field of literary studies and will include an annotated bibliography, a conference paper, and a journal-length essay.
Annually, 3 credits

ENG 699 Text(s) in Context

This course will provide an intensive examination of a small number of texts. It will consider some of the important literary, historical, and philosophical influences on these works and provide students with a richer understanding of their social and historical context.
Annually, 3 credits 

ENG 706 The Critical Tradition: An Introduction to Literary Theory

This course provides students with a crucial background in the major literary approaches that have been developed to read the Western canon from antiquity to the present.  In doing so, it provides a bridge between time-tested conventional and innovative contemporary methods of interpretation.  The creation of great literature is usually paralleled by the presence of great literary criticism.  I. A. Richards (one of the founders of New Criticism) wrote that “literature is inexhaustible to meditation,” and the effort to make sense of literature, to explain its origins and effects, is equally unlimited. Anchored in a series of chronological readings drawn from the full breadth of the Western critical tradition, this course provides a broad survey of the evolution of literary criticism from classicism to postmodernism, from Plato and Aristotle to Michel Foucault and Homi Bhabha.  Its purpose is consequently to familiarize students with some of the principal critics and schools of criticism that have shaped the manner in which literature has been produced and received.  It embraces such diverse contributions as those of Horace, Dante Alighieri, Sir Philip Sidney, John Dryden, Samuel Johnson, Immanuel Kant, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Keats, Percy Shelley, Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, Walter Pater, Henry James, Sigmund Freud, T. S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, Mikhail Bakhtin, Cleanth Brooks, Northrop Frye, Jacques Derrida, Terry Eagleton, Stanley Fish, Elaine Showalter, and Stephen Greenblatt.
Annually, 3 credits

Thesis

ENG 707 Thesis I: Research

This course will help students prepare for writing the master’s thesis. The student will work closely with an advisor and produce an annotated bibliography of secondary sources.
Every Semester, 3 credits

ENG 708 Thesis II: Writing

This course involves actual writing of the thesis under supervision. The completed thesis is evaluated by a three-member committee and is the subject of an oral examination.
Every Semester, 3 credits

Pedagogy(700-705)

ENG 700 Drama in the Classroom

Ideally students would attend a performance of a play and respond to the dynamics of the performance, as well as the physical excitement of the theatre.  However, most often our students experience plays in the classroom; the task for the educator, then, is to use all available resources to help students simulate the total theatrical experience. This course explores the possibilities of an enriched study of plays most commonly taught in the middle and high school curricula.  Six plays will be studied intensively and will serve as models for the development of detailed study plans; students will then select similar types of plays and develop group projects to create interactive plans of study for the selected plays. Among possible selections for intensive study are: Oedipus Rex, Julius Caesar, Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Death of a Salesman, The Crucible  and  Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 701 American Literature in the Classroom

American literature provides a primary basis for understanding our cultural identity. Many works of American Literature frequently appear in middle and high school curricula. This course will explore the cultural and philosophical foundations of American identity while examining multiple approaches to teaching works of American literature most commonly taught in high school. Several texts will be studied intensively and will serve as models for the development of detailed study plans. Among possible selections for intensive study are: Walden, Nature, Huckleberry Finn, The Scarlet Letter, The Great Gatsby, Of Mice and Men, The Catcher in the Rye, and The Things They Carried, The Bluest Eye.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 702 Literature in English in the Classroom

Literature written in English provides a primary foundation for understanding the complexity and diversity of cultures in the Twenty-First Century. While providing students with an appreciation of the richness of literature written in English, this course will examine multiple approaches to teaching those works of literature in English most commonly taught in high school. Several texts will be studied intensively and will serve as models for the development of detailed study plans. Among possible selections for intensive study are: Nineteen Eighty-Four, Brave New World, Dubliners, Things Fall Apart, A Tale of Two Cities, A Doll House, Ethan Frome, The Awakening, Heart of Darkness.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 703 Composition and Writing Pedagogy

This course will acquaint students with the history of writing studies and introduce some of the theoretical strands that inform the contemporary practice of teaching writing.  The course will also treat practical implementation of composing theory and help students become aware of their own writing process and writing standards as well as the political and ethical dimensions of teaching and assessing writing and communication. This course will include such topics as the origin and history of composition and rhetoric and the process and postprocess movements, including the influence of rhetoric, WAC, ESL and linguistics, collaborative learning, expressionism, cognitivism, social constructivism, social epistemic, critical pedagogy, new media/digital literacy, and assessment.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 704 European, English, and American Literature in the Classroom

The course will involve extensive reading, lecture, and discussion.   Works of all genres will be considered, and some attention will be given to difficulties of reading poetry aloud.  Major texts will involve many of the following works:  The Odyssey, Antigone, Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, Jane Eyre, The Scarlet Letter, The Crucible, The War Horse, A Separate Peace, and Lord of the Flies.  Short fiction will includes work by such authors as Poe, Maupassant, Melville, Dickens, Welty, Jackson, and Oates.  Poetry will include work by such authors as Blake, Coleridge, Poe, Dickinson, Frost, and Hughes.
On Occasion, 3 credits

Period, Genre and Major Figure (709-745)

ENG 709 Classical Literature in Translation

Beginning with the Iliad and the Odyssey written during the Eighth-century Renaissance in Greece, the classical tradition provides the foundation for many of the pervasive themes found in the western literary tradition. Characterized by an intense engagement with many of the archetypal myths of Greek oral culture that preceded them, Homer’s epics had a profound impact
upon the tragedies written in the fifth century in Athens and reflected a similar engagement with mythic tradition. By the same token, many of the themes reflected in epic and tragedy find expression in the original material generated by comedy and serve as a constant point of reference for the philosophical and rhetorical traditions also developing at the time. In addition, the presence of pervasive themes concerning all aspects of the human condition, in tandem with the literary forms generated during this period, extends well beyond the Greek world and can also be found in classical eastern texts producing their own unique genres. The literary forms generated in the era of classical Greece also came to have a profound influence on the literature generated in the Roman period. Either through a comparative analysis of eastern and western texts and/or an examination of Greek and Roman ones, this course will examine the literary forms and themes found in classical literature.
On occasion, 3 credits

ENG 711 Mythology

This course will acquaint students with various approaches to myth (including the popular, literary, psychological, folkloric, and anthropological) and the theoretical conflicts and overlaps that exist among disciplines.  Students will examine past and current trends in the study of mythology and consider the relevance of myth for ancient as well as contemporary peoples. Selected myths, legends, and folktales from within and outside of the Indo-European group will be considered.
On occasion, 3 credits

ENG 712 Geoffrey Chaucer: A Writer and His World

This course will introduce the social structure, art, theology, and educational theory of the twelfth to the fourteenth in preparation for reading selected portions of the greatest work of the period's greatest author, The Canterbury Tales. A collection of tales in various narrative forms told by representative members of fourteenth-century English society, The Canterbury Tales is a literary ancestor of the modern short story collection.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 713 Literature of the English Renaissance

The English Renaissance, covering the early modern period from Henry VIII to James I, was a crucial period of unparalleled genius in the development of English literature.  A new fascination with self-examination, fueled by a driving interest in individuality and subjectivity, changed the way we view ourselves today.  Attention to the natural world brought about a new conception of humanity.  Epic, drama, poetry, and literary criticism established new standards of depth and eloquence.  Writers such as Sir Thomas Wyatt, Sir Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, Christopher Marlowe, Sir Walter Ralegh, Michael Drayton, William Shakespeare, Francis Bacon, Ben Jonson and John Donne not only pioneered new methods for describing human experience, but also helped bring into being the concept of “literature” as we know it today.  They were part of a new and highly self-conscious group of writers that gave new meaning to the humanities, and reading them today continues to yield important insights into the paradoxes, contradictions, and complexities of modern life.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 714 Shakespeare

This class provides a forum for exploring key issues in Shakespeare scholarship.  Its aim is to foster an interest in discovering new approaches to the plays and poems.  A writer of unparalleled genius, Shakespeare is the world’s best known and most respected dramatist and poet. As his eloquence makes us more sensitive to language, his uncanny insight into human experience enlarges our sense of self.  Laced with wit and empathy, he embraces the full range of life from its violence and horror to its magic and charm.  His work moreover articulates our most crucial intellectual and ethical dilemmas with extraordinary brilliance.  Semesters are organized around specific approaches or themes, such as: Shakespeare’s dual roles as dramatist and poet; his development and evolution as a playwright; his conceptual and linguistic creativity; the relation of his works to his literary models; and his attitudes toward literature, theater, philosophy, and religion.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 715 Shakespeare’s Late Plays

This course will explore the plays of Shakespeare’s late period.  These plays, called tragicomedies or romances, combine elements of tragedy and comedy in a fairy tale plot.  Primary attention will be devoted to the three major plays The Winter’s Tale, Cymbeline, and The Tempest, but some attention will also be given to the minor and collaborative plays Pericles, Two Noble Kinsmen, and Henry VIII.  In addition to literary values and sources, the special stage conventions of this unusual combined form will be examined closely.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 716 Jacobean and Caroline Drama

This course will explore the characteristics of the dramatic literature of Shakespeare’s later contemporaries and successors, noting enhanced theatrical techniques, changes in fashion, and responses to the increasingly volatile political climate.  Particular attention will be given to the nature of Jacobean revenge tragedy (in such writers as Thomas Middleton, John Webster, and John Ford) and to the development of a new form of tragicomedy by the writing team of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher from the romance form in which Shakespeare was working at the end of his career in the theater.  The new form deals with serious, life threatening situations just as tragedy does, but it ends on a happy note with a marriage celebration arrived at through surprise and arbitrary reversals of fortune.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 717 Metaphysical and Cavalier Poetry

This course studies the development and artistry of two schools of lyric poetry in the earlier seventeenth century.  Ben Jonson and “The Sons of Ben,” including Robert Herrick worked in a lyric mode that endured for centuries while John Donne and such followers as George Herbert and Richard Crashaw developed a mode that found a synthesis of new ideas and old.  While this second school fell out of favor later in the century, it was rediscovered in the early twentieth century and is a force continuing today.  Andrew Marvell is a culminating figure combining elements of both schools.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 718 Seventeenth-Century Prose Style

The earlier seventeenth century is unique as a period of English literature in its paucity of fictional prose narratives, but it is a period rich in other sorts of imaginative prose, works remarkable for style rather than story.  There is the beginning of the essay with Sit Francis Bacon and the beginning of literary biography.  There are remarkable spiritual autobiographies by John Donne, Sir Thomas Browne, John Bunyan, and Thomas Traherne; there are sermons by Donne and Launcelot Andrewes; there is the allegorical Pilgrim’s Progress by Bunyan; there are a spirited Life of her husband by Lucy Hutchinson and a variety of other essays and letters.
On Occasion, 3 Credits

ENG 719 Milton

John Milton is the author of the great epic poem of the English language, Paradise Lost, which will receive major attention.  In addition, the course will cover some of the minor poetry of Milton’s early years, prose works from his middle period, and perhaps one of the works from his last years, the closet drama Samson Agonistes and the brief epic Paradise Regained.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 720 18th Century Literature and Life

Eighteenth century English literature is virtually a mirror image of eighteenth century London:  a thriving, bustling city—the largest and richest in Europe, a hub of finance and commerce, as well as fashion, culture, aristocratic social life and theatres and galleries.  But London was also home to hundreds of thousands of people living in extreme poverty, often dying of starvation.   Samuel Johnson, one of the strongest voices in the literature of the age, once wrote, “When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life.”  Thus the writing of the period was varied and energetic, encompassing all that was important to Londoners and, by extension, to all eighteenth-century Englishmen.  Writings include satirical attacks on the establishment, fanciful tales of exotic lands, successful strategies for young lovers, plays glorifying criminals, and serious discussions of what constitutes genuine happiness.  Readings will include selections from Jonathan Swift, John Gay, Alexander Pope, Susannah Centlivre, and Samuel Johnson.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 721 The Romantic Movement

An exhilarating period of experimentalism, rebellion, and the radically new, the Romantic era brought a revolution in writing. The Romantic poets believed that poetry itself was so powerful that it was revolutionary. Romantics felt that the self was capable of anything: the individual imagination could reach the infinite.  Anyone could strive like a god.  Many Romantic writers questioned traditional ideas such as the inferior position of women in society, the social hierarchy as a natural and just practice, and the existence of a god. Themes that will be explored in this class include the linkage of sex and death and of ecstasy and pain; nature as a means to transcendence; states of trance, dreams, nightmares, and sublimity; the femme fatale and the homme fatale; the Gothic; the outsider, the self-exiled, and the wanderer; and spiritual homelessness. Authors covered will include Wollstonecraft, Mary and Percy Bysshe Shelley, Blake, Wordsworth, Keats, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron and Austen.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 722 Studies in Victorian Literature

Moved by the social and aesthetic concerns of their time, authors of the Victorian period worked to represent in their writing the minutia of what it meant to be alive in 19th-century Britain.  Literature moved from the concerns of the Romantics with sublimity and the apocalypse to a realism interested in such matters as class, money, morals, and manners.  In this course the works of the major novelists and poets of the time will be read closely, but they will also be explored in light of the vast and exuberant changes that were influencing these authors’ lives and those of everyone around them.  This course will revolve around such topics as the modern city and industrialization, gender and sexuality, and religion and science.  Authors read will include Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Hopkins, the Rossettis, George Eliot, Dickens, the Brontës, Conrad, and Wilde.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 723 Gerard Manley Hopkins

Gerard Manley Hopkins is an important poetic innovator in the late Victorian period. Indeed his work could not find an audience in his own age, but when it was finally printed in the twentieth century, it had an immediate impact on the development of modernism. He is famous for introducing the poetics of “sprung rhythm,” a metrical system that provides an alternative to the one in place between the middle ages and the twentieth century. The four units of the course will focus on the famous lyrics, the long poem The Wreck of the Deutschland, the “terrible sonnets,” and the prose works.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 724 The Gothic

Recently we have seen a revival of all things Gothic: an interest in supernatural haunting and communion with the dead; a depiction of the attraction of the villain, the demon lover, the vampire; a reveling in the sublime of altered states of consciousness such as nightmares, drug-induced fantasies, and hysterical episodes. In this course we will study Gothic movements from the late 18th century to the present, in the realms of literature, architecture, painting, and music. We will seek to understand the fascination with mystery, corruption, and evil throughout the ages and why we are still held in their grip today. We will be attentive to the way the Gothic novel of the late 18th century influenced and was influenced by Romanticism, and we will explore the Victorian Gothic and the slow movement of the genre toward its contemporary status as, for the most part, created by and for women. Our investigation will extend to 20th- and 21st-century manifestations of the Gothic: in romance, in cinema, on television, in music, and in fashion.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 725 American Renaissance

In this course, we will examine writings representative of the American Renaissance.  We will begin with the writings of Emerson, Thoreau, and Fuller—all of whom represent the mid-nineteenth-century Transcendentalist movement.  After examining their perspectives on freedom and individualism, we will compare their writings to the Gothic works of Poe, Hawthorne, and Melville, who embrace a darker view of the individual and of the possibilities of attaining freedom in a society influenced by the legacy of Puritanism and the spirit of capitalism.  We will see, in other words, how these American writers commented on, responded to, and “revised” the ideas of those who preceded them.  Finally, we will read literature that further challenges traditional notions of American freedom and identity and that does so in either socially conscious or intensely personal ways.  These works include slave narrative by Douglass and/or Jacobs and the poetry of Whitman and Dickinson.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 726 Late Nineteenth-Century American Literature

In this course we will focus on selected narratives of American realism, paying close attention to how they address in critical ways an earlier tradition of romanticism, and, in the process, attempt to tell more explicitly “historical” tales of America’s post-Civil War period.  In reading works by Henry James, Mark Twain, Edith Wharton, Stephen Crane, Frank Norris, Harold Frederic, Charles Chesnutt, and Mary Wilkins Freeman, we will explore various kinds of realism in order to see how the authors tried to represent distinct aspects of late nineteenth-century American culture.  How, we will ask, do the writings reflect the great social and economic developments that took place during the Gilded Age, during that time in the nation’s history when increased industrialization and commercialism led to what the cultural critic Alan Trachtenberg refers to as the “incorporation of America”?  In what sense do these works speak to the ways in which America, with its rapidly changing social landscape, was redefining itself in spite of attempts on the part of dominant classes (such as the “old money”) to hold on to cherished ideals and traditions?  We will discuss, among other things, the confrontation between the genteel culture and the “vulgar” forces of commerce; the wealthy elite and their relation to “how the other half lives”; the role of the New Woman and the kind of gender trouble that ensued from her presence on the cultural scene; the competing sensibilities of the “feminine” artist and the “masculine” businessman; immigration and the refiguring of the American “race”; the increased importance of scientific discourse and its connection to character types; the life of slaves in the aftermath of slavery; and the conflict between the “pure art” movement and the socially engaged writer.  
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 727 Hawthorne and James: From Romance to Realism

An concentrated analysis of the points of contact between two major American writers, Nathaniel Hawthorne and Henry James.  Two representative works that speak to each other—“Rappaccini’s Daughter” and Daisy Miller—are introduced to show the difference between Hawthornian romance and Jamesian realism.  After examining Hawthorne’s Puritan-oriented works (such as “Young Goodman Brown” and The Scarlet Letter), as well as his novel about transcendentalism, The Blithedale Romance, the course examines how James’s more realistic novels, such as Washington Square and The Portrait of a Lady, take up where Hawthorne left off.  We see how they represent not only the “deeper psychology,” but also issues related to nineteenth-century feminism and consumer capitalism.  The moral, social, and aesthetic views of both writers are explored, and James’s novellas such as The Beast in the Jungle and The Aspern Papers are read in order to demonstrate the intersecting interests of the writers:  how the realist and cosmopolitan literature James produced never escaped the influence of Hawthorne’s more provincial romances.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 728 The English Novel

The rise of the novel in the 18th century is traced in such authors as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding and Sterne. Issues of gender, class, economy, ideology and narrative strategy are explored in the development of the novel as the great middle-class art form in the 19th century in such authors as Austen, Dickens, Eliot and the Brontës. The questioning of traditional values emerges as a theme in the works of such later authors as Hardy, Conrad, Woolf, Joyce and Lawrence. Some consideration will also be given to fiction as a criticism of life, tension between nature and civilization, technical developments in point of view, and the representation of consciousness.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 729 Modern Poetry

This course will focus on the twentieth century as a period of rethinking the nature of poetry in England and America, a period when poets had to grapple with the common understanding that they were living in a “modern” world and that new things were expected of them.  After a consideration of some early indications modern, authors from World War I (for example, Wilfred Owen) and the Irish Renaissance (for example, William Butler Yeats) will be considered.  There will be an exploration of the modernist movement from thematic and linguistic complication (as in T. S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens) toward simplicity (as in Robert Frost, Theodore Roethke, William Carlos Williams).  Confessional and narrative poetry will be considered (as in John Berryman, Stephen Dunne, and Langston Hughes) as a way of validating feelings.  And nonsense (as in E. E. Cummings. Dorothy Parker, and Anthony Hecht) will be noted as a way of reviving poetic form while avoiding the seriousness perceived in traditional poetry.  Finally, we will consider post-modernism and the new formalism as movements displacing modernism and surviving into the twenty-first century.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 730 The Modern Novel

First emerging in the unstable and traumatic historical period immediately preceding World War I and following it, the modern novel decidedly broke with the realist genre preceding it through challenging and often breathtaking experiments with narrative form. Frequently presenting the reader with bewildering shifts in time and narrative perspective and exhibiting a preference for the interior psychological landscapes of its characters, modern novels often possess an emotional intensity and haunting lyricism that testifies to the widespread fragmentation and alienation afflicting western consciousness in the twentieth century. With the use of pioneering literary techniques like stream of consciousness and fragmented narratives, modern novels defy the expectations generated by traditional narrative even as they give us some of the most memorable characters in literature. Possible authors covered in the class include: Conrad, Joyce, Woolf, Lawrence, Faulkner, Kafka, and Rhys.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 731 Modern Drama

What caused the major revolution in playwriting that occurred in the second half of the nineteenth century? Audiences were both shocked and fascinated to find that, instead of watching lavish musical revues and broadly comic farces, they were now peering into the homes of stage characters whose lives and problems resembled their own experiences. Henrik Ibsen, a Norwegian, focused attention on self-definition of characters who were wrestling with subjects never before staged, such as commercial fraud, sexually transmitted disease, and the day-to-day role-playing that characterizes many marriages. Other playwrights from different countries, followed, among them August Strindberg, Oscar Wilde, George Bernard Shaw and Anton Chekhov. Each of them added distinctive elements, each forging his own artistic signature. And the presentation of dramatic situations close to real-life experiences continued to develop through the first half of the twentieth century, expressed in different styles in the works of Eugene O'Neill, Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams. Readings include the major works of the period as students explore the variety of philosophical approaches and their relationship to the anatomy of the plays, as well as different staging and performance practices.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 732 Modern British Literature

At the beginning of the twentieth century, Great Britain was the richest and most powerful nation on earth and had experienced remarkable stability and peace for many decades.  Yet revolutionary change was coming: England would fight two catastrophic wars within the next twenty-five years, its empire would begin to collapse, its wealth would disintegrate, and its young would question every inherited value, including articles of religious faith, traditional institutions, and customary perspectives. The literature written during this century reflects these changed realities, and it is rich, provocative, challenging and disturbing. It performs distinctly modern experiments with some of the traditional components of literature–the use of myth, the rendering of human consciousness, the operations of narrative point of view, and the reordering of form. This course will explore the value of the past and the collapse of traditional sources of meaning and authority; changing gender roles and family structures; the bitter legacy of World War I (the first war of mass destruction); sex as a liberating—yet sometimes destructive—force; and the brutal exploitation that colonialism and capitalism engendered.  We will see the shock of the new in this literature, as well as both the terror and excitement of change.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 733 Twentieth-Century American Literature I: 1900-1945

This course will examine some of the social, cultural, and artistic forces that shaped American literature throughout the first half of the twentieth century. In readings works by Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, Willa Cather, Jean Toomer, Nathanael West, Zora Neale Hurston, Carson McCullers, and others, we will discuss the ways that literature responded to the radical technological, social, and economic changes of the period. For instance, how did American fiction capture the cultural changes brought on by the Great Migration, women’s suffrage, and the Great Depression? How did jazz, avant-garde painting, photography, and architecture shape literary experimentation? How was “highbrow” literature in dialogue with popular culture? We will not only make connections across the boundaries of social class, gender, and race, but we will also interrogate the notion of “American” literature itself.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 734 Twentieth-Century American Literature II: 1945-2000

This course will examine significant trends in American literature in the second half of the twentieth century. We will explore the artistic and socio-cultural concerns that shaped the Beat movement, historiographic metafiction, new journalism, minimalism, and other postmodern experimentation. How do these works engage with issues of gender, sexual, racial, and ethnic difference? How are they challenging our notion of history and American identity? In what ways are they responding to media culture and technology? Some of the authors will include Allen Ginsberg, Tennessee Williams, Flannery O’Connor, Vladimir Nabokov, Thomas Pynchon, John Barth, Amiri Baraka, Ann Beattie, Raymond Carver, Barbara Kingsolver, Maxine Hong Kingston, Toni Morrison, Sherman Alexie, Don DeLillo, and Jhumpa Lahiri.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 735 Contemporary American Drama

This course is a study of plays and other dramatic presentations from the mid-20th century to the present. It is designed to introduce students to the temper and forms of recent American Drama and to familiarize them with significant changes that developed in the genre. Readings
include works by playwrights Hansberry, Albee, Shepard, Baraka, August Wilson,
Marsha Norman, Wasserstein, Mamet, Lanford Wilson, Kushner, and others. Nontraditional
dramatic forms like the musical, the monologue and the performance piece are considered.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 736 Twenty-First Century Literature

This course presents a critical examination of several facets of contemporary world literature in verse and prose. The authors will vary from semester to semester, but will include one or two writers of experimental fiction, at least one figure of international stature, and several contemporary poets.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 737 Comparative Literature

Comparative Literature is a field of study that explores the literature of two or more different linguistic, cultural or national groups or the relationship between literature and other disciplines. Although it sometimes focuses on works in different languages, Comparative Literature is also often practiced on works in the same language. Comparative Literature makes use of an interdisciplinary approach that rejects an exclusive literary perspective in favor of a method that embraces disciplines in the arts, philosophy, history, the social sciences, the sciences and religion. This course will provide an overview of the critical methods of the comparative literature discipline and apply a comparative approach to a particular set of literary works and/or disciplines.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 738 Seminar in a Major Author

This course is designed to provide an intense engagement with a major figure who has inaugurated a unique literary tradition or genre, reshaped an existing tradition in an innovative way, or made a significant contribution to an established genre or period. In addition to examining many of the major works of the author, this course will provide an assessment of the various critical traditions that have grown up around the author, the author’s relationship to other figures in his or her tradition, and an overview of the cultural/historical forces shaping the author’s work. The course will focus on the author’s philosophical preoccupations, thematic concerns, and ideological attitudes with the aim of providing a comprehensive understanding of his or her contribution to literature.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 739 Special Literary Topics

In a given term, the course consists of a close study of a genre, idea or literary circle designated by the faculty member offering the course. It may be taken more than once if content is different.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 740 The Critical Tradition: Advanced Literary Theory

This course provides students with a detailed examination of one or more theoretical models and its application to literary and cultural studies. Possible topics come from a range of modern literary theory such as postcolonialism, feminism, Marxism, queer theory, psychoanalytic criticism, semiotics, deconstruction, and others.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 741 World Drama

Drama has long been seen as an index to the values, attitudes and aspirations of its people.  The course will consider the dramatic tradition as it has developed in different countries and in different ages.  It will capture both the starkness and the raucousness of medieval drama, the glories of the Spanish Golden Age with Lope de Vega, the richness of the Jacobean stage, the sheer comedy of Moliere, the cleverness and wit of English Restoration comedies and the soul-touching romanticism of Goethe.  Readings and discussions will focus on the intent of each of these plays to entertain and enrich its audience by heightening the unique characteristics of its own culture.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 742 Independent Study

This independent research course is taken under the guidance of a professor of English, with the approval of the department chairperson. It may be taken more than once if content is different. It may be taken only after completing 21 credits in English.
Every Semester, 3 credits

ENG 743 Internship

This is a career-oriented course with placement and supervised work in a professional setting in law, publishing, public relations, or the like to provide direct practical experience in the application of skills from academic course work. This course is not a regular classroom course. A student must arrange through the Department Chair to work with a particular faculty member before registering for this course.
Every Semester, 3 Credits

ENG 744 Ibsen, Shaw, Chekhov: Makers of Modern Theatre

Modern theatre derives its essential character from the groundbreaking efforts of three distinctively different playwrights, Henrik Ibsen, George Bernard Shaw, and Anton Chekhov.  The three were as diverse as their national backgrounds; each had his unique vision and each had a signature style of writing plays, but they all had an inner mandate to create drama that was personally relevant to the theatergoer.   Ibsen created lifelike situations that mirrored the day-to-day experiences of his audience; Shaw provoked them by asking outrageous questions and challenging them to answer, and Chekhov sympathized with their feelings of discouragement and, even, futility.  Audiences were engaged, bemused, irritated, and comforted—but, most of all, they were entertained by intriguing plots and both gentle and hilarious comedy.  The course will focus on the major plays of each of the playwrights and will conclude with the reading of selected plays by contemporary playwrights in order to trace influences of Ibsen, Shaw and Chekhov, truly the makers of modern theatre.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 745 American Drama

The soul of America is in its drama, with plays reflecting the nation’s struggles, values, and incredible creative vitality.  From colonial days onward, the American stage celebrated sparkling comedies of manners, sensational melodramas, and heartrending domestic dramas.  During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, American playwrights created, within these forms, memorable Native American characters and addressed topics of particular national interest, such as poverty and slavery, while engaging and entertaining their audience.  The American egalitarian spirit also fostered the creation of a new type of vaudeville, as well as tent shows.  But it was the twentieth century that witnessed the full flowering of American dramatic and theatrical talent in the plays of Eugene O’Neill, Arthur Miller , and Tennessee Williams  and others, as well as the emergence of regional theatres and the development of performance art. Readings and discussions will focus on the American essence of representative plays.
On Occasion, 3 credits

Ethnic and National Literatures(746-760)

ENG 746 American Slave Narratives

An examination of narratives concerning African-American slaves—some autobiographical, some fictional.  How, we will ask, did various representations of slaves not only serve abolitionist goals but also address changing attitudes toward race, gender, law, property, and national identity?  The course also considers the literary-rhetorical aspects of the writings and analyzes the blending of literary and historical discourse, leading to questions about what role the “construction” of the African-American past plays in acts of collective memory. Readings may include the following: The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Melville's "Benito Cereno,” Twain's Huckleberry Finn, Chesnutt’s Conjure Woman tales, and Morrison’s Beloved.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 747 African-American Literature in the Twentieth Century

For African Americans, the twentieth century began with an exodus from the South in the hopes of finding greater opportunity and freedom. Yet this journey was shaped by an ongoing struggle against racism, violence, and socio-economic disenfranchisement. In part, this course examines the artistic response to the social conditions facing African Americans in the twentieth century. With a specific emphasis on the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and Black Feminism, this class investigates the impact of African-American literature on American culture more broadly. How do these movements relate to and differ from other artistic and cultural trends at the time? How do African-American writers interrogate notions of race and ethnicity? Through texts, visual arts, and music, these works challenge us to evaluate the role that racism continues to play in contemporary American culture. Readings will include works by Jean Toomer,Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, LeRoi Jones (Amiri Baraka), Toni Morrison, and Ntozake Shange.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 748: Drama in Ireland from the Irish Literary Revival to the Present

At the beginning of the twentieth century, Irish playwrights such as John Millington Synge, Lady Augusta Gregory, William Butler Yeats, and Sean O'Casey used their art as a means of criticizing, and therefore encouraging dramatic changes in, the social and political status quo at the time in Ireland. As the century progressed, the revivalists' political goals were achieved, but the project of developing a uniquely Irish theater continued with the works of such playwrights as Samuel Beckett, Brian Friel, Conor McPherson, and Martin McDonagh. The course will study the theater of the Irish Literary Revival and its influence on these later dramatists.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 749: Native American Literature

This course will examine works by Native Americans from the 1970s to the present. We will look at how writers and artists construct personal and collective identities, how they relate to specific events and general trends in North American history, and how they interact with dominant European-American cultures and other groups. We will also explore what “native” now means and how it coincides with the changing definitions of “nation” and “culture.” The class will also look at the changing field of literature in general and how literature and literary study are affected by other media, including film and video, music recording, radio and television, and above all, the internet. The political dimension of the works sometimes seems inescapable, but the results are often unpredictable, well balanced, funny, and remarkably beautiful.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 750 Other Shores: National Identity and Cultural Conflict in Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature

The economic, political, and cultural upheavals taking place in the nineteenth century in Russia produced a rich body of literature preoccupied with the question of Russia’s national and cultural identity. Partly as a result of official censorship, social critics were compelled to express their ideas in the form of literature and literary criticism. Through a close reading of several novels and some literary criticism spanning the nineteenth century, we will explore how the problem of Russian identity finds unique expression in the literary aspirations of many of its most influential authors. Issues addressed in the class will include: the struggle to abolish serfdom and its legacy in Russian life, the Russian intelligentsia’s flirtation with populism, anarchism, and nihilism, the influence of Western ideals and literary traditions on Russian cultural achievements, and the philosophical foundations of Russia’s literary achievements. Authors covered in class will include: Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekov.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 751 Postcolonial Literature and Theory

 
Through a close reading of both European and non-European literary and theoretical works, this course will explore the central economic, political, and psychological problems left in the wake of the period of decolonization in the third quarter of the twentieth century. Issues addressed in the class will include: the impact of colonialism upon the psyches of colonizer and colonized alike, the representation of colonized cultures in European consciousness along with challenges to those representations, the instrumental role of paradigms of gender in patterns of colonial domination, the interrelationship between racial, sexual, and economic forms of oppression, and the issue of cultural authenticity as it relates to language and emergent postcolonial identities.
On Occasion, 3 credits

American and Cultural Studies 761-780

ENG 761 The Art of Melancholy

What is the bittersweet emotion known as melancholy?  What is its relationship to inspiration, art, mourning, and death?  This has been a subject for rumination since at least the 17th century, when Robert Burton published the voluminous Anatomy of Melancholy and linked the “disposition” to psychology, physiology, astronomy, and theology.  In the 19th century, melancholy became allied with the artist—it signaled an ability to feel more deeply, to be inspired by the sadness of the world.  It was also seen as a kind of wasting disease—the condition of never being able to get over the past, of profound nostalgia.  Freud argued that the melancholy person never stopped mourning the loss of someone or something.  Today melancholy is often confused with depression.  In this course, we’ll explore melancholy from literary, cinematic, artistic and psychological angles, and we’ll also consider its relation to attitudes towards death and grieving in 19th- and 20th-century Britain and America.  Postmortem photography, painting, and casts will come under discussion, as will 19th-century mourning jewelry and dress.  We’ll also bring memoirs of grief and despair into our investigation. Authors read will include Philippe Ariès; Roland Barthes; Walter Benjamin; Sigmund Freud; William Styron; W.G. Sebold; Joan Didion; John Keats; Alfred, Lord Tennyson; Rainer Maria Rilke; and Anne Carson. We will study paintings by Odilon Redon, Henry Wallis, John Everett Millais, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Movies considered will include The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, La Jetée, and Sans Soleil.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 762 The Poetics of Time and Memory

In this course we consider the ways that time can work magically: loop, repeat, fall away in sublimity.  Our memories carve out time and seem also to link to spaces in the past.  What does it mean for memories to be revised or erased?  Do our memories constitute who we are?  Is it worth dwelling in the past, living an examined life? In this class we will think about what it means to live, as we all must, embedded in time.  Our works will include parts of Proust’s In Search of Lost Time and a tale or two from the Arabian Nights. Film will be a major discipline for this class, as so many splendid films have worked through these topics: La Jetee, Donnie Darko, Groundhog Day, The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Mothlight, Sacrifice, Memento, Don’t Look Now, Silent Light, and The Matrix in particular.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 763 Gender, Sexuality, and Literature

Gender and sexuality are—and always have been—culturally constructed.  This means that our ideas of what a  “woman” is, or a “heterosexual,” have changed drastically throughout history.  Our understanding of these identities has everything to do with forces in our society and next to nothing to do with the bodies we are born in.  Literature plays an important role in exploring how gender has been constructed historically, and certain seminal texts have themselves caused cultural shifts in what these terms mean. To serve as a foundation, this course will consider a range of theoretical approaches, from psychoanalysis to queer studies to performance studies and beyond.  Works by such authors as Mary Wollstonecraft, Oscar Wilde, Virginia Woolf, Anais Nin, Jean Genet, Radcliffe Hall, Audre Lorde, Jeannette Winterson and others will also be studied.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 764 Magic Realism

Originally used by the German art critic Franz Roh to characterize painting that exhibited an altered representation of reality, the term “magic realism” has come to be associated with literature with fantastic elements that defy rational explanation. Other salient qualities of magical realist fiction include: the deadpan presentation of fantastic events, the extensive use of symbolism and sensuous detail, the disruption of linear time, and the use of implausible events to provide social and political commentary. Through a close reading of several representative works from the tradition, we will explore the unique blend of realism and fantasy that gives magical realism its distinctive signature. Some major themes addressed in the course will include: the social construction identity as it pertains to human sexuality and political power, the epistemological instability generated by the representation of fantastic events, the presentation of utopian alternatives to oppressive political systems, and the use of the supernatural to represent the inner psychic landscape of human experience. Authors covered in the class will include: Marquez, Rushdie, Okri, Allende, Morrison, Rhys, and Roy.
On Occasion, 3 credits

English 765 Staging Modernism: The Little Theatre Movement and Twentieth-Century American Culture

At a time when mainstream American culture was promising most people (particularly whites) access to greater wealth and a higher social status, the Little Theatre Movement began producing plays that emphasized realism. These works tried to offer audiences greater insights into everyday life, not escapist fantasies, and in some cases, these insights focused on the messages of mass culture itself. With a particular emphasis on the Provincetown Players, the class will examine early twentieth-century theatre’s contributions to American drama and its relationship to modernism and American popular culture. Readings include plays by Susan Glaspell, George Cram Cook, Eugene O’Neill, Edna St. Vincent Millay, E. E. Cummings, Djuna Barnes, and John Dos Passos.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 766 The Jazz Age: 1920s American Literature and Culture

The course examines the “Jazz Age,” a term coined by F. Scott Fitzgerald to designate the 1920s as a rowdy decade of parties, social rebellion, sexual freedom, and creative energy. Gender roles and sexuality became more fluid. African-American culture achieved greater prominence as a result of the Harlem Renaissance. And technology—from mass produced automobiles to kitchen appliances—radically transformed daily life in the United States. Literature participated in and responded to these changes as well, providing rich insight into a decade marked by the achievement of women’s suffrage, National Prohibition, and a burst of prosperity that, despite its cultural prominence, did not reach all American citizens and could not compensate for post-World War I trauma. Fictional readings will be supplemented by historical material such as advertisements, jazz lyrics, and films as well as contemporary arguments on bobbed hair, consumerism, and birth control. Some authors will include Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Willa Cather, Nella Larsen, Anita Loos, and others.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 767 Sex, Drugs, and Rock ‘n’ Roll: 1950s American Literature and Culture

Just as 1950s seemed to embrace homogeneity, prosperity, and conformist values, it was also a period characterized by profound anxiety and uncertainty. The maniacal efforts of McCarthyism encouraged a culture of fear. The success of Playboy magazine, the popularity of Marilyn Monroe, and the shocking findings of Kinsey’s report on female sexuality undermined the images of female domesticity as popularized on television sitcoms. The Civil Rights Movement demanded radical changes in American racial hierarchies. And rock ‘n’ roll deepened the generational divide, suggesting to many a crumbling of traditional moral values. This course will examine the contradictory impulses of this era through literature, film, and television. Some of the literary texts will include James Baldwin’s Giovanni’s Room, Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita, Ralph Ellison’s The Invisible Man, Flannery O’Connor A Good Man Is Hard to Find and Other Stories, and Jack Kerouac’s On the Road.
On Occasion, 3 credits

English 768 The Bloomsbury Group

Virginia Woolf wrote that “in or about December 1910, human character changed.” Although Woolf was writing about Roger Fry’s hugely influential Post-Impressionist art exhibition, she was also thinking of her own literary practice, and of the patterns of behavior exhibited by the artists, writers and lovers who “belonged” to the Bloomsbury Group, that iconoclastic collection of people who lived in and around the Bloomsbury section of London in the early days of the twentieth century.  This course will trace the ideas and experiments—visual, literary, sexual—enacted by figures such as Virginia Woolf,  Lytton Strachey, E.M. Forster, Roger Fry, Vanessa Bell, Clive Bell, Duncan Grant and some of their many other London and Cambridge associates.                                                                         On occasion, 3 credits

English 769 American Nightmares: Film Noir and the Age of Uncertainty

Film noir first emerged out of the economic and social conditions of the 1930s, and not surprisingly, these films marked a significant shift in the thematic and visual landscape of American cinema. Characterized by gritty realism, film noir depicts a world characterized by criminality, ruthless self-interest, stoicism, and moral ambivalence. This class will examine several examples of classic film noir alongside the fiction that inspired it. In addition to considering the various influences on this genre, we will situate these works in their social and historical context, consider the challenges of adaptation, and examine lighting and other filmic techniques that define noir. Some of the writers will include Dashiell Hammett, James M Cain, Raymond Chandler, and Ernest Hemingway.
On Occasion, 3 credits 

English 770 Bodies on Display: Perspectives on the Body in American Culture from the Nineteenth Century to the Present

This course seeks to explore some of the rich historical materials treating aspects of the human body as it has been viewed, exhibited, analyzed, and objectified in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will examine some key primary works, fiction, film, photography, and a selection of interpretive studies that consider the social and cultural construction of bodies in America. The readings in this course are intended not to add up to some neat thesis but to raise questions of interpretation and meaning. Whether blackface minstrels, freaks, turn-of-the-century body builders, flappers, or presidents like FDR and John F. Kennedy, these figures challenge us to think about some of the forces that have shaped—and continue to shape—the ways in which we think about and interpret the body.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 771 In Cold Blood: Understanding Horror in Art and Culture

Why do we enjoy being scared? What attracts us to the disturbing and horrifying? How can we be frightened by something that we know is false? Or, as Stephen King puts it in his nonfiction study Danse Macabre, “why are people willing to pay good money to be made extremely uncomfortable?” These types of philosophical questions have been raised since gothic fiction laid the foundation for the horror genre in eighteenth-century England. Many scholars consider Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto (1764) the starting point of horror. Along with the works of Ann Radcliffe, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, and others, these writers established the conventions that continue to shape horror fiction, film, and television. This course will investigate the philosophical themes and underpinnings of this genre. In addition to studying several novels and films, we will also read a range of criticism that explores the impressive scope and versatility of the horror genre: philosophy, psychoanalytic criticism, feminism, queer theory, film studies, and literary and cultural studies. Texts include Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, short fiction by Edgar Allan Poe and Washington Irving, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood, Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho, and Patrick Süskind’s Perfume.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 772 English Nonsense Literature

Nonsense is a kind of humorous fantasy literature that operates within a framework of undisguised rules circumscribing an alternative reality that illuminates the absurdities and limitations of everyday life.  This course will examine nonsense as a literary mode in a variety of genres, focusing on nineteenth-century British material.  It will cover such issues as what liberties of form and expression distinguish nonsense from work in more conventional genres and from other fantasy writing, what nonsense tells us about freedom in the real world, and why there was a particular flowering of writing of this sort during the Victorian Era.  After a consideration of the much earlier John Taylor the Water Poet and short poetic forms like limericks, clerihews, and double dactyls, we will consider the mathematical fantasy novella Flatland by Edwin A. Abbott and move on to the major works of the most famous nonsense writer, Lewis Carroll: the children’s book Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, the philosophical fantasy Through the Looking-Glass, the strange hybrid work Sylvie and Bruno and Sylvie and Bruno Concluded, and the mock epic poem “The Hunting of the Snark.”  The late Victorian comic operettas of W. S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan and farces of Oscar Wilde will be examined for content and performance values.  And finally we will look at a twentieth-century comic novel by P. G. Wodehouse and some contemporary material.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 773 Erotica

This course will explore the stigmatized phenomenon of erotica by examining such once scandalous works that now seem perfectly acceptable as John Cleland's Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure and Gore Vidal's Myra Breckinridge.  The course will explore the growth in sexual explicitness in modern literature (for example in Nicholson Baker) and consider such questions as whether a writer like Philip Roth can be funny and erotic at the same time, why feminist critics have failed to criticize Anaïs Nin for things that they object to in Vladimir Nabakov, and why it is that works in French to a greater extent than works in English have been accorded mainstream acceptance despite depicting specialized sexual practices.  The course will also consider whether men like Aaron Travis writing about men erotically for other men and women like Zane and Pat Califia (if she is a woman) writing erotically for other women have an identifiable style.  Some attention will be given to poetry.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 774 American Colonial Literature

This course examines writing in America before 1800 (roughly the period between the European "discovery" and the first products of an officially independent United States). We will examine the written evidence to find who the settlers were, what they expected or wanted or demanded, how they reacted to what they found, and what models of expression they developed to record their experiences. Readings will emphasize the variety of viewpoints that described America life and the terrific energy that writers brought to their tasks. We will also examine critical models of interpretation in both historical and contemporary forms.
On Occasion, 3 Credits

Rhetoric/The English Language (781-800)

ENG 781 Classical Rhetoric

This course acquaints students with the history of ancient rhetorics in order that they may gain a clearer understanding of the influence of ancient rhetorical theory within Western culture and the history of Western education. The course focuses on several major rhetoricians (Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Quintilian) as exemplars of this historical period. Through close readings of primary texts, students will develop a literacy about key figures, events, and concepts. Besides developing a deeper understanding of classical rhetoric, students will also learn how to write persuasively in different rhetorical situations.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 782 Theories of Persuasion: Ancient and Modern

This course examines the different theories of persuasion from ancient times to early twentieth century. Throughout the semester students learn how to write persuasively using the ethical and emotional techniques of classical Greece, the theological strategies of the Middle Ages, the psychological techniques of the Enlightenment, and the stylistic and grammatical techniques of the early twentieth century.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 783 Eighteenth-Century Writers on Writing

This course acquaints students with the theory and practice of writing in the eighteenth century. The first half of the course is devoted to examining different theories of writing and its relationship to philosophy, science, and literary criticism of the Enlightenment. In the second half of the course, students use these theories as lenses to examine modern discourse practices, including political speeches, literary texts, advertisements, and food packaging.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 784 Structure of English

Cross-listed as LIN 511 An advanced course in English grammar and syntax for writers, teachers and others who need an in-depth understanding of the structures of the language. Topics will include sentence structure and phrase structure rules, style, word classes, constituency, parts of speech, sentence relatedness, and usage. Some attention will be given to style and discourse analysis of longer texts.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 785 Linguistics of Contemporary English

This course is an introduction to the linguistic analysis of modern English, including its structures, sounds, history, variation and use. We will explore its affinities with languages such as German, Dutch and French and examine the differences between the varieties of English that exist within the U.S. and around the world, the so-called Global Englishes. We will also consider English in diverse contexts of use to see how speakers draw inferences in conversation and how our use of the language speaks to our attitudes toward class, gender and other sociocultural variables. Finally, the course will consider the ways in which specialized knowledge of the English language can be drawn upon by educators, creative writers and scholars of literature.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 786 Stylistics

Stylistics is the linguistic analysis of texts--the study of style in language. In this course we will analyze a variety of literary and non-literary texts in order to explain how language creates meaning, style and effect. Topics include language structure, discourse, narrative and conversation structure, sound patterns, rhythm, variation, speech and thought presentation, and politeness strategies. The course will be useful to writers, teachers, students of English literature and anyone who wishes to develop a richer knowledge of the language.
ENG 787 is cross-listed as LIN 511.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 787 Introduction to Linguistics

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of language. We will cover the fundamentals of linguistic structure: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics, as well as aspects of language as a human neurocognitive system, including first language acquisition, psycholinguistics, and neurolinguistics. We will also study language change and variation in terms of both the cognitive and social significance of language. ENG 788 is cross-listed as LIN 512.
Annually, 3 credits

ENG 788 History of the English Language

The course presents a historical and linguistic study of the development of our language from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 789 Historical Linguistics

This course is a historical survey of language study giving special attention to the classical origins, the extensive development in the nineteenth century, and the current understanding of the classification of languages into families. Topics include how languages change by analogy, how the sounds of language change over time, and how borrowing occurs.
ENG 790 is cross-listed as LIN 514.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 790 Sociolinguistics

Cross-listed as LIN 515 This course explores the relationship between language and society, with emphasis on language variation in and across speech communities. Topics include language and dialect interaction, bilingualism and multilingualism, language and gender, language planning, and sociolinguistic field methods.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 791 Language Acquisition

Cross-listed as LIN 516 This course is an introduction to how languages are learned. It will cover modern theories of both first and second language acquisition and discuss implications for the classroom.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 792 Applied Linguistics

Cross-listed as LIN 517 This introduction to applied linguistics will examine several ways that scholars and educators use linguistics and related sciences to identify and address such issues as problems in language and culture as language and literacy, cross-cultural communication, language education and academic development, foreign language education, language proficiency assessment, bilingual and vernacular language education, language policy and planning, and linguistic public policy. On Occasion, 3 credits
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 793 Language and Gender

In this course, we will look at the ways in which our use of language reflects and sustains our cultural attitudes about gender. We will begin by looking at how linguistic phenomena are linked to social ones, and go on to consider how gender roles are enacted through our use of and attitudes toward language-for example, in how we organize our conversations, the degree to which we use indirectness or politeness strategies, and the amount of talking time we occupy and how we do so.  We will encounter a number of different ways of analyzing and interpreting our data, and debate the merits of each based on our own experiences as English speakers.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 794 Varieties of English

This course will look into the ways in which varieties of the English language differ and will consider the reasons for these differences. Using Standard American English as a starting point, we will look at the important differences in structure, sound and vocabulary between American English and varieties such as African American English, Appalachian English, Standard British English, Belfast English, Singapore English, Australian English, South African English and others. As we go, we will address important questions such as: Is one variety of English "better" than the others? How do different varieties come into existence? What have been the effects of the gradual spread of English on indigenous languages?
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 795 Pragmatics and Discourse

Pragmatics is the study of language use, and of how context--such as utterance, discourse, social and cultural context--affects meaning. This course will introduce the fundamental concepts and phenomena of pragmatics, including context, speech acts, presupposition, discourse coherence, implicature, politeness, conversation analysis, and the cooperative principle. We will bring this background to the analysis of a variety of written and spoken texts and conversations, including advertisements, naturally occurring speech, television dialogue and literary texts.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 796 Theories of Academic Literacy

The purpose of this seminar is to enable students to become informed of writing theories and tutoring practices. Students will study the needs of students from a range of cultures, language backgrounds and life experiences who want to succeed at writing for a variety of audiences and purposes. By the end of the semester, students will be able to theorize from experiences about the intersections of language, culture, disciplines and academic literacies.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 797 Theories of Writing and Composing Pedagogy

This course will acquaint students with the history of writing studies and introduce some of the theoretical strands, including overlaps and controversies, that inform the contemporary practice of teaching writing.  The course will treat the practical implementation of composing theory. It will help students become aware of their own writing process and writing standards as well as the political and ethical dimensions of teaching and assessing writing and communication. This course will include such topics as the origin and history of composition and rhetoric and the process and post process movements, including the influence of rhetoric, WAC, ESL and linguistics, collaborative learning, expressionism, cognitivism, social constructivism, social epistemic, critical pedagogy, new media/digital literacy, and assessment.
On Occasion, 3 credits

ENG 798 Composition for International Graduate Students

This course is an introduction to academic writing in the American university for international students at the graduate level. Students will read and analyze academic discourse of various forms and from a number of disciplines in order to develop an awareness of the writing conventions that govern the organizational structure and language of these texts. They will practice using linguistic forms and vocabulary that are appropriate for particular purposes, such as summary, critique, data commentary and analysis. They will also develop research skills, learning to gather credible sources and document them using the citation style appropriate to their discipline. They will analyze assignments from a number of disciplines to recognize and respond to reader expectations for a variety of assignment types. There will be numerous opportunities for students to practice their speaking and listening skills and to develop confidence participating in an American classroom setting. The course will emphasize process-oriented writing and revision, allowing students to gain editing skills as well as the opportunity to respond to the writing of their peers.
On Occasion, 3 credits