Health Sciences

SCHOOL OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS AND NURSING

Pre-Pharmacy Program


The Pre-Pharmacy Program is designed to prepare qualified students to enter LIU Pharmacy (the Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences at LIU Brooklyn). The program consists of a six year curriculum leading to a Doctorate of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree and is separated into two phases:

  • Pre-professional (Pre-Pharmacy) Phase - two years of study to be completed at LIU Post
  • Professional Phase - four years of study to be completed at LIU Pharmacy
Doctor of Pharmacy

Dramatic changes taking place in the health-care system are creating many new and exciting roles for pharmacists. Fundamental to the changing role of the pharmacist is the evolving concept of pharmaceutical care, which has been defined as "the responsible provision of drug therapy for the purpose of achieving definite positive outcomes that improve a patient's life." The pharmacist is now not only responsible for the safe and effective distribution of prescription and nonprescription medication, but is also assuming the role of pharmaceutical therapy advisor and manager, having increasingly more patient-care responsibilities. Under the paradigm of pharmaceutical care, the entry-level pharmacist is expected to participate fully in the management of the patient, including the rendering of independent clinical judgments. The pharmacist must be proficient in the search for and retrieval of information from the scientific literature, utilization of complex pharmacokinetic models to determine appropriate doses, development of individualized pharmaceutical care plans, communication with patients and health professionals, documentation of pharmaceutical interventions taking into account patients' knowledge, beliefs, and behavior, pharmacoeconomic analysis of alternative pharmaceutical interventions, and justification of services billed to managed health-care organizations and other payers.


About the Pre-Professional Program

Successful completion of two years of pre-professional study (P-1 and P-2) in the basic sciences, mathematics and humanities provides the foundation for admission to the professional pharmacy curriculum. Completion of these requirements by current LIU students does not guarantee admission.  The professional program is very competitive and offers no guarantee of admission. Selection is based on several factors that include, but are not limited to grade point average; test scores; personal statement; letters of recommendation; and interview. Only those P-1 or P-2 students who meet the following progression requirements will be eligible to apply to the first professional year of study (P-3) at LIU Pharmacy at LIU Brooklyn:

  1. Satisfactory completion of all P-1 and P-2 course requirements.
  2. An overall cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 ("B").
  3. A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 ("B") in all required P-1 and P-2 math and science courses.
  4. Completion of the PCAT.
  5. Submission of a PharmCAS application.

To be accepted as a Pre- Pharmacy major, an incoming freshman must have an SAT score of at least 1,000 and a high school average of 80 or, if below 1,000 on the SATs, then an average of 85.
Students not accepted into the Pharmacy Program at the Brooklyn Campus may continue at LIU Post as Biomedical Sciences, Health Information Management, Health Sciences, Medical Imaging, Biology, Chemistry or Physics majors (or other appropriate fields).

Admission Requirements

Incoming freshmen must have a solid B average (3.0 or 82-85 grade point average) and an average SAT score of 1000 (Critical Reading and Math combined) or ACT Composite of 20 or above.
  • Transfer students must have completed more than 24 college credits. If you have completed fewer than 24 credits, you must also submit high school transcripts and SAT/ACT scores. A minimum college G.P.A. of 2.5 is required for application review.
  • IMPORTANT NOTE: Competitive admission to the professional phase of Pharmacy degree requires a minimum GPA of at least 3.0 (4.0 scale) for cumulative, science, and mathematics for consideration.

    Transfer students must submit official transcript(s) from all colleges or universities attended and two letters of recommendation preferably from former science professors. Both transfer students and starting sophomores at LIU Post must follow these requirements.
  • Submitting an Application for Admission

    All applicants can apply for admission to LIU Post at My LIU or by using the Apply Now button in the upper right-hand corner of this page. For more information on the application process, visit the Admissions home page.

    Professional Phase (Year 3) Admission Requirements

    Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.)

    Professional Pharmacy Program (Brooklyn Campus)

    The professional Pharmacy Program leads to a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree and may be completed in six years: two years at LIU Post; four years at LIU Brooklyn. The professional phase of the Doctor of Pharmacy Program provides four years of specialized education that is necessary to develop expertise in the field of pharmacy and patient-centered care as well as prepares the student for professional licensure examinations. The program consists of didactic and experiential course work in years 3, 4, and 5 followed by 37 ½ weeks of advanced practice experiences in year 6 which are completed in hospital, community and other pharmacy practice settings. LIU Pharmacy (the Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences) accepts a limited number of students each year to the third year (first professional year) of the Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) program. Entry into the professional phase of the program is very competitive. Acceptance into the pre-professional phase offers no guarantee of admission to the professional phase. Selection is based on several factors that include, but are not limited to:  grade point average, test scores, personal statement, letters of recommendation, and an interview. Only those students who meet the following requirements will be considered for admission to the first professional year of study at LIU Pharmacy:

    Application Requirements for the Professional Program (Year 3)

    1. Complete and submit the Pharmacy College Application Service (PharmCAS) application. PharmCAS is an electronic application service operated by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP).

    ALL professional (year 3) applications, MUST be processed through this service. There is a separate non-negotiable fee required payable to PharmCAS. Please see the PharmCAS application instructions for additional information. To complete the application and receive further information please visit their web site at www.pharmcas.org. All applications for the professional program, including external transfer and current LIU students, must be processed through PharmCAS, there are no exceptions. Listed below are additional requirements for application completion.

    • Personal Statement - Part of the PharmCAS application is a personal essay, approximately one page in length, addressing why you selected Pharmacy as a career and how the Doctor of Pharmacy degree relates to your immediate and long-term professional goals. You should explain why you want to be a pharmacist, and support this information with autobiographical details including pharmacy, health care, work or volunteer experiences, related extracurricular activities, leadership roles, or any other important information.
    •  Letters of Recommendation - Two letters of recommendation are required. These letters can be from an employer, professor, supervisors of a community service project, etc.; however they may not come from a family member, teaching assistant, co-worker or friend. You will need to designate your evaluators as part of your PharmCAS application. Electronic submission of letters of reference is preferred but paper references are accepted. Paper references must be accompanied by the printed PharmCAS evaluation form available on the PharmCAS web site. 
    • PharmCAS 'Academic Update' Window – PharmCAS provides an opportunity for you to update the coursework section of your application to include grades for newly completed courses as well as edit in-progress/ planned coursework for current and future semesters. Immediately following the close of the fall semester, the 'Academic Update' window will open for a limited time.  **Carefully read the instructions for the academic update before completion**

    Application deadline:  The application, transcripts, and supporting materials must be received by PharmCAS by the deadline. (This deadline is firm. NO applications will be considered if the February 1st deadline date is not met.)

    2. Submit the following supporting credentials:

    • Transcripts – Immediately following the completion and submission of your PharmCAS application forward official transcripts and foreign credential evaluations (if attended university outside of the U.S.) to both PharmCAS and the LIU-BC Admissions Processing Center. Also, provide a list of current and future coursework in progress; i.e. fall, spring, and summer semesters (if planned).
    • Foreign Credential Evaluations – Foreign Credential Evaluations – Students who have obtained university education outside of the U.S. must submit credential evaluations and translations for review and consideration.  Transfer of course credits will be considered on a case-by-case basis.
    • Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) – The PCAT is required for all students who wish to apply for the professional phase of the Pharm.D. program. This test measures the student's verbal ability, reading comprehension, quantitative ability, chemistry, biology and writing skills. Scores must be submitted directly to PharmCAS. (In order to submit scores directly to PharmCAS choose the PharmCAS three digit school code 104 when making application for the PCAT.) Preregistration for the PCAT is required. Please find the available testing dates and sites listed on their website at www.PCATweb.info. PCAT scores should not be older than 3 years.
    • Other Exams

    Standardized Tests - Transfer credit may be considered for the exams listed below.  Please submit the following official score reports to the Admissions Processing Center for consideration:
    Advanced Placement (AP) – minimum score 3
    International Baccalaureate (IB) – minimum score HL 4
    College Level Examination Program (CLEP) – minimum score 50 (computer based)

    English Proficiency - Students for whom English is not their native language must submit evidence of English proficiency. Students who have studied where English is the primary language of instruction may submit an SAT Critical Reading score as evidence of proficiency; minimum required score is 480. Otherwise, submit results for one of the English Language score reports listed below to PharmCAS; SAT scores may be submitted to the Admissions Processing Center:
    Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL PBT) – minimum score 550
    Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL iBT) – minimum score 219
    International English Language Testing System (IELTS) – minimum score 6

    *Please use the 'Student Credential Cover Sheet' to submit supporting credentials to the Admissions Processing Center

    3. Grade Point Average (GPA) – Applicants to the professional program should possess a GPA of at least 3.0 (4.0 scale) for cumulative, science, and mathematics for consideration. However, depending upon the quantity and quality of applications received and because LIU Pharmacy offers only a limited number of seats for the professional program a competitive GPA may be higher than 3.0.

    4. Prerequisite Coursework The College of Pharmacy anticipates that its class will be filled by applicants who are scheduled to complete the required prerequisite coursework by the conclusion of spring semester. Applicants that require summer courses to complete pre-professional requirements do not receive full priority for consideration of admission. Please see the LIU Brooklyn Undergraduate Bulletin for the complete listing and course descriptions of prerequisite courses.

    5. Personal Interviews - Personal interviews will be required for selected candidates only. Notification to interviewees will be posted to the individual PharmCAS accounts. Applicants will also receive a letter by mail.

    6. Additional Information - LIU Pharmacy requires criminal background checks and drug screening for applicants but should NOT be completed until requested.

    Additional Information

    Program/Curriculum Information
    Information regarding pre-requisite courses, course descriptions, and program/curriculum information is available in our LIU Pharmacy Bulletin, Undergraduate Bulletin, and the annual Pharmacy Guidelines Booklet. 

    Communications
    Status checks - Applicants should log into their accounts on the PharmCAS website to retrieve information.  Once the university has received your application information the status will be changed to 'Received/Under Review'. This status will remain until the admission decision has been made. Decision letters, invitations to interview and requests for additional information may be sent through U.S. Postal Mail and the email account listed on the PharmCAS application. 

    Admission Decisions
    ACCEPTANCE letters will be mailed during the last week in April. A $500.00 non-refundable tuition deposit is required to hold the seat; generally due three weeks from the date on the acceptance letter.  Tuition deposits are NOT required for current LIU students. WAIT LIST candidates will be notified by mail between June 1st and September 1st of changes to their application status.

    Financial Aid
    Applicants to the College of Pharmacy who are U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens should submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Scholarships and grants are available to entering and continuing students

    Mailing Address
    After submission of the LIU-BC supplemental application, please forward official transcripts, foreign credit evaluations, PCAT scores, AP/IB/CLEP scores (if taken), etc. to the Admissions Office for review.   The mailing address is:
    LIU Brooklyn
    Admissions Processing Center
    P.O. Box 810
    Randolph, MA 02368-0810

    To view the LIU Pharmacy Bulletin and to receive further information pertaining to applying to the professional phase of the Pharm.D. program at LIU Brooklyn, please download it here.

    Program of Study

    Natural Sciences Core (a minimum of 20 courses – 68 Credits)

    Course (Pre-Requisite)   Credits
    COL 101 College 101 (not required for transfer students) 1
    BIO 103 General Biology I 4
    BIO 104 (BIO 103) General Biology II 4
    BIO 7 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4
    BIO 8 (BIO 7) Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4
    BMS 90 Microbiology in Health Sciences 4
    CHM 3 (MTH 3) Principles of Chemistry I 4
    CHM 4 Principles of Chemistry II 4
    CHM 21 (CHM 4) Organic Chemistry I 4
    CHM 22 (CHM 21) Organic Chemistry II 4
    ECO 10 Introduction to Microeconomics 3
    ENG 1 Composition 3
    ENG 2 Composition: Argument and Analysis 3
    ENG 7 (ENG 1 & 2) Western Literature: Classical, Medieval, Renaissance 3
    ENG 8 (ENG 1 & 2) Western Literature: Enlightenment to Modern 3
    HIS 1* &  HIS 2* or PHI 14* & PHI 19* Western Civilization to the 18th Century  and  Western Civilization since 1789  or  Symbolic Logic and Medical Ethics 3
    MTH 7 (MTH 3) Calculus and Analytical Geometry I 3
    PHY 3 (MTH 7) University Physics I 4
    PSY 1 General Psychology I 3

    *Students must take both History 1 and History 2 or any two courses from Philosophy 8 through 37. The following philosophy courses are particularly recommended for students in the pre-pharmacy program: PHL 8, PHL 10, PHL 13, PHL14, PHL 18, PHL 19. The Philosophy sequence is strongly recommended by LIU Pharmacy.

    IMPORTANT NOTICE:
    For students that seek to secure placement in other Pharmacy programs outside of Long Island University, addition pre-requisite courses may be required. The undergraduate classes required for admission into a pharmacy degree program vary significantly from one institution to the next. Due to the variations in admission requirements and procedures among the colleges and schools of pharmacy, it is advisable to research different pharmacy programs. Visit the pharmacy school Web sites for course requirements. School specific information is also available on the PharmCAS site and in the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) annual publication, "Pharmacy School Admission Requirements". These publications can be found at http://www.aacp.org/resources/student/pharmacyforyou/admissions/Pages/PSAR.aspx

    Pre-requisite course for some Pharmacy schools may also include:

    Course (Pre-Requisite)   Credits
    CHM 71 Basic Biochemistry 4
    MTH 19 or 41 or BIO 141 or ECO 72 Statistics 3
    PHY 4 (PHY 3) University Physics II 4

    Course Descriptions

    BIO 103 General Biology I

    Processes fundamental to all living things such as energy utilization, growth, development, and reproduction will be examined from the perspective of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. The goal will be a comprehension of the functioning of the living organism as embedded in the integration of these fundamental biological mechanisms. Not open to students who have taken BIO 1M or BIO 3. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.
    Fall, 4 credits

    BIO 104 General Biology II

    This course introduces patterns and processes of organisms and groups of organisms with emphasis on their origin, evolution, and the relationships among them and their environments. Topics include evolution, population genetics, systematics, animal behavior and ecology. Not open to students who have taken BIO 1S or BIO 4. Three hours lecture, Three hours laboratory.
    Prerequisite BIO 103 is required. Prerequisite of not having taken BIO 1S or BIO 4 is required.
    Spring, 4 credits

    BIO 7 Human Anatomy and Physiology I

    This course covers the structure and function of the human body, including basic biochemistry, cell structure, cell division, cell respiration, tissue composition, genetics, and the nervous and endocrine systems. Laboratory focuses on relevant physiological experiments and histology. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.
    Fall,4 credits

    BIO 8 Human Anatomy and Physiology II

    This course covers the body's organ systems in detail, including the musculo-skeletal, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, excretory, digestive, and reproductive systems. Relevant dissection, histological studies, and physiology are all featured in the laboratories.
    Prerequisite BIO 7 is required. Spring, 4credits 

    BMS 90 Microbiology in Health Sciences

    This course is required for all medical biology majors and health related majors including those students seeking graduate study in the biological sciences and those seeking admission into professional schools. The course introduces the principles of clinical microbiology and characteristics of microorganisms, host-parasite relationships, resistance, immunity, hypersensitivity, public health, epidemiology as well as applied, medical and industrial microbiology; includes clinical diagnostic methods such as culture, control, identification, sterilization, microbiological techniques and concepts; emphasizes those techniques specifically employed in the clinical microbiological laboratory.
    Fall and Spring, 4 credits

    CHM 3 Principles of Chemistry I 

    In this course, the basic principles of Chemistry are stressed to prepare the student for further work in the sciences.
    Prerequisite MTH 3 or Corequisite MTH 7 or MTH 8 is required. Three hours lecture, one three-hour laboratory.
    Fall, 4 credits per semester

    CHM 4 Principles of Chemistry II

    This course is the second part of a two semester sequence that includes the study of colligative properties, kinetics, chemical equilibria, acid-base Chemistry, chemical thermodynamics, and electro-chemistry.
    Prerequisite of CHM 3 is required. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.
    Spring, 4 credits

    CHM 21 Organic Chemistry I

    This course is a systematized study of the nomenclature, structure, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds, including qualitative organic analysis and organic reaction mechanisms.
    Prerequisite CHM 4 is required. Three hours lecture, four hours laboratory.
    Spring, 4 credits
     

    CHM 22 Organic Chemistry II

    This course is a systematized study of the nomenclature, structure, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds, including qualitative organic analysis and organic reaction mechanisms.
    Prerequisite of CHM 21 is required. Three hours lecture, four hours laboratory.
    Fall, 4 credits

    CHM 71 Basic Biochemistry

    This course is a one-semester introduction to the major concepts of biochemistry including carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins and nucleic acids.
    Pre-requisite CHM 22 or CHM 25 is required. Three hour lecture; Three hour laboratory.
    Every Semester, 4 credits

    ECO 11 Introduction to Macroeconomics

    This course discusses the important economic theory and concepts that facilitate understating economic theories and concepts that facilitate understanding economic events and questions. Its main focus is on analyzing the behavior of important economic aggregates such as national income, unemployment, inflation, interest rates, exchange rates and economic growth. The effects of the government’s monetary and fiscal policies on economic growth and inflation are also examined.
    Every Semester, 3 credits

    ECO 12 Introduction to Microeconomics

    This course discusses the important economic theories and concepts that facilitate understanding economic events and issues. Its main focus is on the choices made by consumers, producers, and governments, and there interactions of these choices. Topics include demand and supply, consumption, and production, competitive and non-competitive product markets, markets for resources, and welfare.
    Every Semester, 3 credits

    ENG 1 Composition

    English 1 is an introductory writing course that uses interpretation and analysis of texts to promote clear thinking and effective prose. Students learn the conventions of academic writing. In addition, students learn how to adapt writing for various audiences and rhetorical situations. This course is required of all students unless exempted by Advanced Placement credit or successful achievement on the SAT examination in writing. Students exempted by assessment or department proficiency examination must take an upper-level English course in substitution after completing ENG 2. Special sections are offered for students in the Program for Academic Success (P sections), for nonnative speakers (F sections), and for students identified as needing more personalized attention (S sections). No Pass/Fail option
    Every Semester, 3 credits

    ENG 2 Composition: Argument and Analysis

    English 2 is a course in analysis and argumentation, focusing on scholarly research and documentation. Building on the work begun in English 1, the course develops knowledge of complex rhetorical and stylistic techniques and culminates in a library research paper. This course is required for all students unless exempted by Advanced Placement credit. Special sections are offered for students in the Program for Academic Success (P sections) and for non-native speakers (F sections). No Pass/Fail option.
    Every Semester, 3 credits

    ENG 7 Western Literature: Classical, Medieval, Renaissance

    The development of the common culture of Western civilization will be illustrated through such works of the Bible as Genesis and Job and through masterpieces of such writers as Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Virgil, Dante, Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton. Selected works from non-Western cultures may be introduced for comparison. Not open to students with credit for ENG 303. Students who complete both ENG 7 and ENG 8 fulfill the Core requirement in literature or language.
    Prerequisites of ENG 1 and ENG 2 are required.
    Every Semester, 3 credits

    ENG 8 Western Literature: Enlightenment to Modern

    The development of the various national cultures of European civilization during the 18th, 19th, and earlier 20th centuries will be illustrated through literary masterpieces of such writers as Moliere, Voltaire, Blake, Mary Shelley, Goethe, Melville, Dickinson, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Ibsen, Pirandello, Kafka. Selected works from non-Western cultures may be introduced for comparison.  Not open to students with credit for ENG 304. Students who complete both ENG 7 and ENG 8 fulfill the Core Requirement in literature or language.
    Prerequisites of ENG 1 and ENG 2 are required.
    Every Semester, 3 credits

    HIS 1 Western Civilization to 1789

    This course examines significant religious, cultural and political aspects of Western civilization from the fall of Rome through the Enlightenment.
    Fall, 3 credits

    HIS 2 Western Civilization since 1789

    A general survey of Western history from the eighteenth century to the present that covers important events and developments like the French Revolution, industrialization nationalism, liberalism, imperialism, the First World War, the Russian Revolution, the  rise of fascism, World War Two and the Holocaust, the Cold War, the fall of Communism in Eastern Europe, the dissolution of the former Yugoslavia, and globalization.
    Every Semester, 3 credits

    MTH 7 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I

    This course covers the derivative of algebraic and trigonometric functions with applications to rates, maximization and graphing and integration and the fundamental theorem. This course cannot be taken for credit by any student who has completed or is currently taking MTH 1 or 6.
    Prerequisite of MTH 3 with a grade of C- or better or permission of department is required. 
    Every Semester, 4 credits

    MTH 19 Basic Statistics

    This course is directed toward understanding and interpreting numerical data. Topics covered include: descriptive statistics, regression, correlation, sampling techniques and elements of inferential statistics. This course cannot be taken for credit by any student who has completed or is currently taking MTH 23, MTH 41/BIO 141 or MTH 8.
    Annually, 3 credits

    PHI 19 Medical Ethics

    This course will explore philosophical issues raised by modern medical technology and practice, such as: experiments on humans and animals; genetic engineering; transplants; the responsibility of the hospital to the community; decisions about who gets limited medical resources; the issues surrounding AIDS; mental illness and behavior control; patient rights, including the right to the truth.
    Fall, 3 credits

    PHY 3 University Physics I 

    Physics 3 is the first half of an introductory, calculus-based, physics course for science and mathematics majors, covering the laws and principles of mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves.
    Prerequisite or corequisite of MTH 7 is required. Four lecture hours and two laboratory hours each week. Annually, 4 credits

    PHY 4 University Physics II

    Physics 4 is the second half of an introductory, calculus-based physics course for science and mathematics majors. It is concerned with the laws and principles of electricity, magnetism, and optics, and includes an introduction to modern physics.
    Prerequisites of PHY 3 and MTH 7 and co-requisite of MTH 8 are required. Four lecture hours and two laboratory hours each week.
    Annually, 4 credits

    PSY 1 General Psychology I

    This course is a survey of the principles of psychology. Learning, motivation, emotion, sensation, perception, statistical methods and the biological basis of behavior are among the topics covered.
    Every Semester, 3 credits

    Sequence of Courses

    Freshman

    Fall   Spring  
    Course Title Credits Course Title Credits
    BIO 103 - General Biology I 4 BIO 104 - General Biology II 4
    CHM 3 - Principles of Chemistry I 4 CHM 4 - Principles of Chemistry II 4
    ENG 1 - Composition 3 ENG 2 - Composition Argument/Analysis 3
    MTH 7 - Calculus & Analytical Geometry I 4 ECO 11 – Intro to Macroeconomics 3
    COLL 101 - Freshman Seminar 1 PHI 19 - Medical Ethics 3
    Library Competency 0    
           
    Total Credits 16 Total Credits 17

    Sophomore

    Fall   Spring  
    Course Title Credits Course Title Credits
    BIO 7 - Human Anatomy  & Physiology I 4 BIO 8 - Human Anatomy  & Physiology II 4
    CHM 21 - Organic Chemistry I 4 CHM 22 - Organic Chemistry II 4
    ENG 7 - Western Lit. Classical 3 ENG 8 - Western Lit. Enlightenment 3
    PSY 1 – General Psychology I 3 HIS 2- Western Civil. since 1789 3
    PHY 3 - University Physics 4 BMS 90 - Microbiology in Health Sciences 4
           
    Total Credits 18 Total Credits 18

    CONTACT

    School of Health Professions and Nursing
    Stacy Gropack, Dean
    Roth Hall, Room 300
    516-299-2485

    post-shpn@liu.edu