Contact Us

Course Descriptions

BIO 103 General Biology I

Processes fundamental to all living things such as energy utilization, growth, development, and reproduction will be examined from the perspective of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. The goal will be a comprehension of the functioning of the living organism as embedded in the integration of these fundamental biological mechanisms. Not open to students who have taken BIO 1M or BIO 3. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.
Fall, 4 credits

BIO 104 General Biology II

This course introduces patterns and processes of organisms and groups of organisms with emphasis on their origin, evolution, and the relationships among them and their environments. Topics include evolution, population genetics, systematics, animal behavior and ecology. Not open to students who have taken BIO 1S or BIO 4. Three hours lecture, Three hours laboratory.
Prerequisite BIO 103 is required. Prerequisite of not having taken BIO 1S or BIO 4 is required.
Spring, 4 credits

BIO 7 Human Anatomy and Physiology I

This course covers the structure and function of the human body, including basic biochemistry, cell structure, cell division, cell respiration, tissue composition, genetics, and the nervous and endocrine systems. Laboratory focuses on relevant physiological experiments and histology. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.
Fall,4 credits

BIO 8 Human Anatomy and Physiology II

This course covers the body's organ systems in detail, including the musculo-skeletal, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, excretory, digestive, and reproductive systems. Relevant dissection, histological studies, and physiology are all featured in the laboratories.
Prerequisite BIO 7 is required. Spring, 4credits

BMS 90 Microbiology in Health Sciences

This course is required for all medical biology majors and health related majors including those students seeking graduate study in the biological sciences and those seeking admission into professional schools. The course introduces the principles of clinical microbiology and characteristics of microorganisms, host-parasite relationships, resistance, immunity, hypersensitivity, public health, epidemiology as well as applied, medical and industrial microbiology; includes clinical diagnostic methods such as culture, control, identification, sterilization, microbiological techniques and concepts; emphasizes those techniques specifically employed in the clinical microbiological laboratory.
Fall and Spring, 4 credits

CHM 3 Principles of Chemistry I

In this course, the basic principles of Chemistry are stressed to prepare the student for further work in the sciences.
Prerequisite MTH 3 or Corequisite MTH 7 or MTH 8 is required. Three hours lecture, one three-hour laboratory.
Fall, 4 credits per semester

CHM 4 Principles of Chemistry II

This course is the second part of a two semester sequence that includes the study of colligative properties, kinetics, chemical equilibria, acid-base Chemistry, chemical thermodynamics, and electro-chemistry.
Prerequisite of CHM 3 is required. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.
Spring, 4 credits

CHM 21 Organic Chemistry I

This course is a systematized study of the nomenclature, structure, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds, including qualitative organic analysis and organic reaction mechanisms.
Prerequisite CHM 4 is required. Three hours lecture, four hours laboratory.
Spring, 4 credits

CHM 22 Organic Chemistry II

This course is a systematized study of the nomenclature, structure, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds, including qualitative organic analysis and organic reaction mechanisms.
Prerequisite of CHM 21 is required. Three hours lecture, four hours laboratory.
Fall, 4 credits

ENG 1 Composition

English 1 is an introductory writing course that uses interpretation and analysis of texts to promote clear thinking and effective prose. Students learn the conventions of academic writing. In addition, students learn how to adapt writing for various audiences and rhetorical situations. This course is required of all students unless exempted by Advanced Placement credit or successful achievement on the SAT examination in writing. Students exempted by assessment or department proficiency examination must take an upper-level English course in substitution after completing ENG 2. Special sections are offered for students in the Program for Academic Success (P sections), for nonnative speakers (F sections), and for students identified as needing more personalized attention (S sections).
No Pass/Fail option Every Semester, 3 credits

ENG 2 Composition: Argument and Analysis

English 2 is a course in analysis and argumentation, focusing on scholarly research and documentation. Building on the work begun in English 1, the course develops knowledge of complex rhetorical and stylistic techniques and culminates in a library research paper. This course is required for all students unless exempted by Advanced Placement credit. Special sections are offered for students in the Program for Academic Success (P sections) and for non-native speakers (F sections).
No Pass/Fail option.
Every Semester, 3 credits

ENG 7 Western Literature: Classical, Medieval, Renaissance

The development of the common culture of Western civilization will be illustrated through such works of the Bible as Genesis and Job and through masterpieces of such writers as Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Virgil, Dante, Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton. Selected works from non-Western cultures may be introduced for comparison. Not open to students with credit for ENG 303. Students who complete both ENG 7 and ENG 8 fulfill the Core requirement in literature or language.
Prerequisites of ENG 1 and ENG 2 are required.
Every Semester, 3 credits

ENG 8 Western Literature: Enlightenment to Modern

The development of the various national cultures of European civilization during the 18th, 19th, and earlier 20th centuries will be illustrated through literary masterpieces of such writers as Moliere, Voltaire, Blake, Mary Shelley, Goethe, Melville, Dickinson, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Ibsen, Pirandello, Kafka. Selected works from non-Western cultures may be introduced for comparison.  Not open to students with credit for ENG 304. Students who complete both ENG 7 and ENG 8 fulfill the Core Requirement in literature or language.
Prerequisites of ENG 1 and ENG 2 are required.
Every Semester, 3 credit
s

HIS 1 Western Civilization to 1789

This course examines significant religious, cultural and political aspects of Western civilization from the fall of Rome through the Enlightenment.
Fall, 3 credits

HIS 2 Western Civilization since 1789

A general survey of Western history from the eighteenth century to the present that covers important events and developments like the French Revolution, industrialization nationalism, liberalism, imperialism, the First World War, the Russian Revolution, the  rise of fascism, World War Two and the Holocaust, the Cold War, the fall of Communism in Eastern Europe, the dissolution of the former Yugoslavia, and globalization.
Every Semester, 3 credit

MTH 3 College Algebra and Trigonometry

A pre-calculus course providing a unified treatment of functions of algebra and trigonometry. 
Every Semester, 4 credits

MTH 19 Basic Statistics

This course is directed toward understanding and interpreting numerical data. Topics covered include: descriptive statistics, regression, correlation, sampling techniques and elements of inferential statistics. This course cannot be taken for credit by any student who has completed or is currently taking MTH 23, MTH 41/BIO 141 or MTH 8.
Annually, 3 credits

ORC 17 Speech Communication in Organizations

The principles of effective speech communication in business, professional, governmental and community organizations are examined. The emphasis is on the public address, the use of visual aids, the informative report, group and sales presentations, conducting and participating in an open meeting.
Every Semester, 3 credits

PHI 8 Introduction to Philosophy

Philosophy asks fundamental questions about the meaning and purpose of life, truth, morality, social justice, the existence of God, the nature of beauty, etc. This course introduces students to such questions through an encounter with the ideas of some of the greatest philosophers in history.

PHI 13 Human Values

This course is an introduction to human values that focuses on such ethical, social and aesthetic questions as: What is the basis of right and wrong? How can one gain knowledge of good and evil? How do we judge beauty? What do we mean by justice? What makes life worth living?
3 credits, Every Fall, Spring and Summer

PHI 19 Medical Ethics

This course will explore philosophical issues raised by modern medical technology and practice, such as: experiments on humans and animals; genetic engineering; transplants; the responsibility of the hospital to the community; decisions about who gets limited medical resources; the issues surrounding AIDS; mental illness and behavior control; patient rights, including the right to the truth.
Fall, 3 credits

PHY 11 College Physics I 

Physics 11 is the first half of an introductory, non-calculus physics course, that covers the laws and principles of mechanics, thermodynamics and wave. The combination of Physics 11 and 12 satisfies the physics requirements of most schools of medicine, dentistry, physical therapy, and the like. Six hours lecture/laboratory.
Annually, 4 credits

PSY 1 General Psychology I

This course is a survey of the principles of psychology. Learning, motivation, emotion, sensation, perception, statistical methods and the biological basis of behavior are among the topics covered.
Every Semester, 3 credits

SOC 1 Introduction to Sociology

This course covers nature and the organization of human society, socialization, culture and social interaction.
Every Semester, 3 credits

SPE 5 Voice and Diction

Communication is part of every aspect of our lives. In this course, students will explore the nature of a wide variety of communication forms and will acquire the skills to 1) formulate more effective verbal and non-verbal messages, 2) communicate more effectively in interpersonal relationships, 3) listen actively, and 4) manage interpersonal conflict. Students will also, learn to communicate more effectively during interviews and to construct and deliver effective public speeches.
Every Fall and Spring, 3 credits