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Course Descriptions

FOUNDATION COURSES

SWK 601: History & Philosophy of Social Work & Social Welfare (Policy I)

This introductory course will present information about the development of social work as a profession. It provides students with knowledge of historical and contemporary social welfare policies, services and institutions. The course examines the economic, political, and organizational systems that influence the creation and delivery of social services. Specific social issues are used to illustrate the link between social welfare policy and social work practice. In addition, students will gain historical and contemporary knowledge of the various forms of oppression and discrimination. Throughout the semester, students will also learn about social and economic justice that benefits populations at-risk.

SWK 602: History & Philosophy of Social Work & Social Welfare (Policy II)

This course is the second class in the policy sequence. Students explore the modern welfare state from local, state, federal, and national perspectives and learn about those factors, which contribute to the existence of social problems. Students are introduced to a framework for policy analysis and related concepts such as the basis of social allocations, and the nature of social provisions. The course also provides students with the opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the social work profession’s role in advocacy and social action for policy change. Information about government benefits and programs including those that address income support, family and child welfare, disability, aging, substance abuse, and health care are also provided.

SWK 611: Social Work Practice I: Working with Individuals & Groups

The first of three practice courses, this course provides a foundation for social work practice on micro and mezzo levels with diverse populations in a variety of settings. It provides an overview of the values, ethics and knowledge base upon which social work practice is based. The course provides a generalist problem solving approach to the understanding of social work practice with individuals and groups. Building upon the generalist model this course demonstrates the linkages between a generalist perspective and an integrated theoretical perspective for advanced practice with individuals and groups. The course includes historical content, person in-environment and systems perspectives, communication and relationship-building exercises, a walk-through of a clinical interview and the stages of treatment, an integrated clinical approach to individual and group practice and an application of generalist and advanced practice skills with groups in specific settings.

SWK 612: Practice II: Social Work Practice II: Working with Families

The second of three courses in the Practice Sequence, this course focuses on working with families and the individuals within the family through the life span. Developing an understanding of the interplay between the developmental issues of the individual and the life stages of the family as a unit, through the life span will be a primary focus of the course. Another primary focus of the course is an exploration of the work of various family theorists and their varied methods of intervention. Special emphasis will be placed on psychodynamic systems and cognitive/behavioral theories and techniques of intervention.

SWK 613: Social Work Practice with Organizations and Communities

This course will provide a generalist perspective of the role of the social worker in the organization and the community. The course presents a generalist problem solving approach to the understanding of practice with organizations and communities and the application of knowledge and skills with these two systems. The course includes content on the contexts in which macro practice occurs, i.e. communities and neighborhoods, organizations, and the legislative arena; and, the components of coalition building within an interdisciplinary theoretical framework.

SWK 621: Human Behavior in the Social Environment I

This course, the first of two in this sequence focuses on understanding human behavior via assessing the interaction between developmental processes and environmental factors. The course covers biological, psychological, social and moral development and the acquisition of skills necessary to lead civil, moral, and fulfilling life. The course examines these developmental processes in the context of social structures such as the family, the school, the community and the culture. The course provides the theoretical and empirical support for several social work values and ethical standards. These values and standards include respect for the dignity and uniqueness of the individual, respect of a person’s right to self-determination, and respect for spirituality and the religious beliefs of others.

SWK 622: Human Behavior in the Social Environment II

This course, the second of two in this sequence, focuses on understanding human behavior via assessing the interaction between developmental processes and environmental factors throughout adulthood and the latter part of life. The course covers biological, psychological, and social development, evaluating major theories such as psychosexual development, psychosocial development, learning theories and system theories. Developmental processes are examined in the context of social structures such as the family, the school, career choices, the community, and the culture. The course examines the interaction among theories of development and presents an integrated understanding of human behavior in the social environment. Each phase of life, from early adulthood to old-age, is carefully examined in light of the various developmental theories to provide a thorough understanding of the reciprocal relationship between individuals and their environment. In addition, the theoretical frameworks of the course are evaluated in terms of their applicability to social work practice and interventions that are geared towards assisting clients of diverse background in making positive changes in their lives.

SWK 798: Research I

Research I, the first in a sequence of two is taught during the first semester of the foundation year. It provides the graduate generalist student with the basic knowledge and skills that are necessary in order to appreciate the role of research in the practice of social work. This course introduces the students to the ethical and conceptual aspects of research. Further, the course introduces the students to basic qualitative and quantitative research designs as well as to the use of computer software programs that are often utilized in the design and implementation of research and in the communication of findings.

SWK 701: Field Instruction I Foundation

This is the first course in a four semester Field Instruction sequence in the Masters in Social Work program. The first two semesters of Field Instruction provide the Foundation and the second two semesters provide the Specialization. The Foundation prepares students 1) to function at a beginning level of competence in a social service delivery system 2) to develop generalist problem-solving and relationship-building skills, 3) and to integrate and apply knowledge from Practice, Policy, HBSE and Research to work with clients.

SWK 702: Field Instruction II Foundation

This is the second course in a four semester Field Instruction sequence in the Masters in Social Work program and the final semester of Field Instruction in the Foundation year. Field Instruction II continues to prepare students 1) to function at a beginning level of competence in a social service delivery system 2) to develop generalist problem-solving and relationship-building skills, 3) and to integrate and apply knowledge from Practice, Policy, HBSE and Research to work with clients.

ADVANCED (SECOND YEAR) COURSES

SWK 614: Advanced Principles of Administrative and Clinical Practice within an Interdisciplinary Context

The course is designed to orient advanced standing students to advanced practice knowledge introduced in the first year of the two year MSW program to close a knowledge gap between advanced standing students and regularly matriculated students. As such, the course provides a theoretical orientation to the interdisciplinary context of social work practice; identifies the components of role conflict resolution; and, explores strategies for promoting interdisciplinary collaboration. Building upon the generalist model, this course demonstrates the linkages between a generalist perspective and an integrated theoretical perspective for advanced clinical practice with individuals and groups. The course also explores commonalities and differences between a generalist perspective for working with families and more specialized approaches. Special emphasis is placed on psychodynamic systems and cognitive/behavioral theories and techniques of intervention with individuals, groups and families. [This course is required for Advanced Standing students.]

SWK 799: Research II

Research II, the second course in this sequence is taught during the Fall semester of the advanced curriculum year. It builds upon the knowledge-base that was established in Research I. Research II provides the specialist graduate student with knowledge and skills necessary to appreciate “the application of scientific, analytical approach to building knowledge for practice and for evaluating service delivery in all areas of practice" (C.S.W.E., 2000). Research II focuses on application and expansion of basic research skills that were taught in Research I. Ethical principles of research are reinforced throughout the course. Guided by ethical principles, and building on skills that they have acquired in Research I, students have the opportunity to design a research project, focusing on investigating role conflict in an interdisciplinary context of social work practice. Students choose a topic that is unique and specific to their respective areas of concentration. Students learn how to apply research methods and how to analyze data in order to generate knowledge about, and to systematically evaluate, the practice of social work in their respective areas of concentration. Students also learn to consider ethical and multicultural issues as they design evaluation instruments for practice and policy of social work and as they learn how to derive conclusions from empirical data.

SWK 650: Psychopathology

This course provides a bio-psycho-social perspective to a range of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 4th Ed Text Revised (DSM-IV-TR) classified maladaptive behaviors that are exhibited by many social work clients. It provides an in-depth study of the etiology, course, prognosis, and resolution of major psychological and psychiatric conditions. The DSM-IV TR multiaxial system will serve as a backdrop and context in which these conditions will be presented and studied. The Competency Based Assessment Model, which follows a “process of reviewing and understanding an individual’s past in order to distinguish and interpret present concerns,” (Zide & Grey 2001) is the theoretical and philosophical framework through which the course’s information will flow. Student will become familiar with DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria and the empirical and epidemiological data that supports each diagnosis. The course will also look at the behaviors that are evaluated in the process of arriving at a differential diagnosis. The cultural context will play a major role in understanding these conditions.

SWK 623: Administrative Behavior

This course provides students with a conceptual framework for understanding human service organizations with a special emphasis on the social work field. It explores the role and function of the agency-based social work practitioner and manager through the study of organizational behavior and structure. Students also consider the function of human service organizations within the context of economic, political, social and technological factors and the ways in which these factors influence administration and service delivery. The course provides an overview of important management functions and tasks that are necessary to provide quality services to clients including how to manage information, finances, and people.

SWK 790: Capstone

This course, offered in the spring semester of the concentration year is intended to provide students with the academic framework within which they design and implement the capstone project. Students review their knowledge about role conflict within interdisciplinary setting that is related to their respective areas of concentration studies. Students then choose a topic related to the concentration area and design and carry out a research project that examines role conflict within an interdisciplinary context of social work. Finally, students design a solution to the role conflict that is embedded in interdisciplinary collaborative practice of social work. The course focuses on application of skills that have been taught in previous semesters to a particular area of concentration. Such skills include: Critical thinking, ethical practice, practice skills in systems of all sizes, research skills, communication skills, organizational skills and interdisciplinary collaboration.

SWK 703: Field Instruction III Specialization

This is the third course in a four semester Field Instruction sequence in the Masters in Social Work program. The first two semesters of Field Instruction provide the Foundation and the second two semesters provide the Specialization. The Specialization year prepares students 1) to gain expertise in gerontology, nonprofit management, substance and alcohol abuse or child and family welfare, 2) to function at an advanced level of competence in a social service delivery system, 3) to continue to practice problem-solving and relationship-building skills, 4) and to continue to integrate and apply knowledge from Practice, Policy, HBSE and Research to work with client systems.

SWK 704: Field Instruction IV Specialization

This is the fourth course in a four semester Field Instruction sequence in the Masters in Social Work program. The first two semesters of Field Instruction provide the Foundation and the second two semesters provide the Specialization. The Specialization year prepares students 1) to gain expertise in gerontology, nonprofit management or substance and alcohol abuse counseling or child and family welfare 2) to function at an advanced level of competence in a social service delivery system 3) to continue to practice problem-solving and relationship-building skills, 4) and to further develop and integrate and apply knowledge from Practice, Policy, HBSE and Research to work with client systems.

ALCOHOL & SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT CONCENTRATION

SWK 674: Theories & Principles of Alcohol & Substance Abuse Counseling

This course will introduce students to the basic theories and principles of alcoholism and substance abuse counseling, as well as techniques for motivating the chemically dependent client to engage in treatment. Emphasis will be placed on the theories of vocational counseling and the relationship between work, self-esteem, and recovery.

SWK 675: Introduction to the Techniques of Substance Abuse Counseling

This course will provide students with a foundation in basic and advanced techniques of counseling the substance abuse population. Student will receive a comprehensive overview of chemical dependency treatment and explore various counselor intervention methods. The qualities and professional skills necessary for competent and effective practice will also be thoroughly examined.

SWK 677: Sociological & Psychological Aspects of Substance Abuse

This course will offer students a comprehensive view of substance abuse from a historical perspective exploring what importance cultural and social views play (ed) in the treatment of such disorders. Students will utilize cultural attitudes, legal sanctions and normative values regarding substance use and will analyze what addiction is, and who is defined as an addict by various disciplines (i.e., medicine, sociology, psychology etc.) and systems (i.e., family, criminal justice, social service etc). Students will examine ethnicity and its role in substance abuse and counseling. Students should be prepared to think critically and engage in a dialogue regarding the complex bio-psycho-social issues that impact persons who are afflicted with the disease of addiction and how these complex issues impact treatment strategies.

SWK 678: Physical and Pharmacological Effects of Substance Abuse

This course will examine how the abuse of alcohol and other drugs affect the body with emphasis on the central nervous system, organ systems and general physical health. The physiological basis for the disease concept of addiction will be reviewed. Psychoactive drug categories will be explored in relation to the history of use, routes of administration and how the body processes licit and illicit substances. The effects of drugs and pharmacological interactions on metabolic processes and neuropsychological functioning will be discussed.

CHILD & FAMILY WELFARE CONCENTRATION

SWK 660: Families & Children: Policies & Services

This course enables students to build upon their knowledge of social welfare policy and services and apply this knowledge to the needs of children and their families. It presents students with knowledge of concepts, policies and practices, which characterize child welfare services in American society. It provides historical and legal information about various policies and programs within family and children’s services at the federal, state and local levels and examines the multiple systems that influence the life of children and their families. In addition, it explores current trends, controversial and topical issues in child welfare and family services and the social worker’s role in an interdisciplinary approach, and how to advocate for individuals and families.

SWK 661: Family Violence Across the Lifespan

This course examines the problem and consequences of family violence across the lifespan and its impact on children. It presents theoretical, research, policy and practice issues involving intra-familial child abuse and neglect, intimate partner violence, child witnessing of intimate partner violence, and elder abuse. It explores individual and group level interventions, structural influences on family violence, and policy implications in the field of social work. In addition, the course will emphasize rights to safety and safety planning for populations at-risk within the context of social justice with an emphasis of how interdisciplinary approach can assist in the empowerment of survivors of abuse.

SWK 662: Community Based Practice with Children & Families

This course provides students with the opportunity to hear community based practitioners present actual case studies based on a “case of the week” model. These cases provide students with the opportunity to review family and children type cases presented by local practitioners. Each case will present a client profile, history, bio-psycho-social assessment and Questions/Discussion to precede the practitioner’s discussion of the actual case outcome/current standing. Cases will come from a variety of organizations including some that focus on prevention, child abuse and maltreatment, foster care and adoption substance abuse, physical and emotional disabilities, health and mental health.

SWK 663: Childhood Psychopathology

This course provides a bio-psycho-social developmental perspective on a range of childhood disorders as they are classified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 4th Ed Text Revised. (DSM-IV-TR). It provides an in-depth study of the etiology, course, prognosis, and resolution of major psychological and psychiatric conditions that are encountered by children with an emphasis on a family and system approach to the conceptualization and treatment of such conditions. The DSM-IV-TR multiaxial system will serve as a backdrop and context in which these conditions will be presented and studied. A developmental-systems (Mash and Barkley, 1996) approach will guide the theoretical and philosophical framework of this course as the students become familiar with DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for childhood psychopathology and the empirical and epidemiological data that supports each diagnosis. The course will look at internalizing and externalizing disorders of childhood that social workers are likely to encounter in various settings of practice (e.g., schools, hospitals, community centers, adoption agencies, ACS and DSS agencies). The students will learn to consider issues such as adaptation, age appropriateness, clusters and patterns of symptoms and behaviors that are instrumental in the process of differential diagnosis. The cultural context will play a major role in understanding these conditions and the differential validity, to the extent to which it exists, in assessment and treatment of children.

GERONTOLOGY CONCENTRATION

[Note: Brooklyn Campus course numbers are indicated in italics next to C.W. Post course numbers.]

LONG TERM CARE (TRACK I)

Those who take the Long Term Care Administration track will gain an in-depth understanding of health care facility administration, health care financing, legal issues in health care, and personnel management. The Long Term Care Administration track meets most of the academic requirements for eligibility for the Nursing Home Administrator’s licensing examination in New York State.

HAD 710/PM 738: Gerontology: Processes of Aging

This foundation course surveys the multidisciplinary field of gerontology and provides an overview of issues related to the aged as a population group and aging as a process. Theoretical approaches and research findings about the biological, psychological and social processes of aging are reviewed with emphasis on interventions to facilitate optimal functioning in older adults. This course may be used in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a certificate in gerontology.

HAD 711/PM 739: Long Term Care Administration

Long Term Care Administration must consider the special administrative and organizational methods, social systems and population that are attributable to all kinds of residential and long term care facilities, as separate entities from acute care hospitals. The course will include an overview of the long term care continuum, including community care, management issues, Medicare and Medicaid, finance, pertinent laws and regulations, and patient/resident/staff regulations and needs. Care and treatment standards will be reviewed and discussed, as well as policy changes and government trends associated with a new paradigm of aging.

Choose 2 out of 3 of the following:

HAD 709/MPA 616: Legal Aspects in Health

Students will be introduced to health care legal principles and processes and will be provided with a thorough overview of ways to limit the risk of liability in various health care settings while improving the quality and safe delivery of health services. An examination of the myriad legal and regulatory issues that confront professionals working in health care organizations will be conducted.

HAD 602/MPA 602: Human Resource Administration in the Health Sector

The course is concerned with the central issues of the human resources management function within health care institutions and agencies. It is oriented towards the role of the function as a process that is intended to maximize contributions to the organization by its employees. This orientation includes issues such as human resources development and training, recruitment and selection retention and labor management relations. In addition, it is necessary to consider the characteristics of the talent pool and its relationship to organization and societal needs. These issues include human resources planning; equal employment opportunity; affirmative action; occupational health and safety; training and development diversity, and fair labor standards. Finally, the course is concerned with the reductions-in-force, personnel ceilings, the rapid expansion and contractions of personnel resources, and workforce diversity, the use of contract and temporary employees will be considered.

HAD 603/MPA 613: Foundations in Budgeting & Finance in Health Care

The course covers the principles of budget and finance and includes the following topics: budgetary systems, methods, processes and cycles, preparation, justification and financial information systems. The course also includes a survey of the federal prospective payment system and other current developments in reimbursement methods. It provides a depth of understanding in the area of budget and finance that is critical to administrative functioning in long term care. In conjunction with the others, this course meets the academic requirements for licensing as a nursing home administrator in New York State.

GERONTOLOGY – SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE (TRACK II)

The Senior Community Service track incorporates both clinical and administrative content areas. Students on this track will learn to plan and develop community services for older adults; perform intervention and treatment planning and understand and manage issues of death, dying, bereavement and loss.

HAD 710/PM 738: Gerontology: Processes of Aging

This foundation course surveys the multidisciplinary field of gerontology and provides an overview of issues related to the aged as a population group and aging as a process. Theoretical approaches and research findings about the biological, psychological and social processes of aging are reviewed with emphasis on interventions to facilitate optimal functioning in older adults. This course may be used in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a certificate in gerontology.

HAD 726/HAD 726: Interdisciplinary Assessment

Interdisciplinary Assessment provides a collaborative framework for comprehensively assessing the needs of elderly clients and client populations, and for the development of better linkages among disciplines serving the elderly. The course promotes a clarification of the roles of different practitioners and the purposes of different health, financial, legal and social service organizations serving the elderly in the community.

Choose 2 out of 3 of the following:

HAD 712/PM 743: The Management of Senior Community Programs

The emphasis in this course is on the basic skills necessary to supervise and conduct programs for the majority of older adults who are community residents. Among these are workshops and seminars on issues of retirement, nutrition, general health, outreach, information and referral assistance, and related services. Governmental programs and relevant laws and regulations are integrated with each topic.

HAD 729/PM 744: Bereavement: Psychological, Cultural & Institutional Perspectives

This course is designed to explore the stages and issues related to dying and grieving. Cultural diversities in the grieving process will be identified. Myths and ideas that inhibit, isolate and interfere with the bereavement experience will be examined. Political, medical, legal and ethical issues will be analyzed. Students’ values, attitudes and fears will be explored in order to inform their interventions. Social, cultural and personal issues that govern a person’s reaction to death and dying will be highlighted. In addition, students will learn to design organizational structures for interdisciplinary assessments and service delivery in settings serving the dying and bereaved.

HAD 728/PM 745: Financial, Estate & Retirement Planning

The course addresses crucial issues affecting the financial future of seniors. While the interface of gerontology and legal estate planning issues are the areas for discussion, the objectives and competencies focus on integrating general and professional education. Thus HAD 728 prepares students for successful and satisfying careers in gerontological services by linking scholarship and critical thinking with the demands of professional practice and the challenges of fundamental career issues.

NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION

[Note: Brooklyn Campus course numbers are indicated in italics next to C.W. Post course numbers.]

NPM 650/MPA 624: Introduction to Nonprofit Management

An examination of the formation ,financing and management of not-for profit and cooperative organizations with a focus on the internal components of not for profit organizations, including the board of directors, workforce, marketing, financial management, fund raising, planning, leadership and the methods and strategies that have been used to successfully manage not for profit organizations. The course will also examine the role of not for profits in the delivery of public services through fee for service, contracts and reimbursement arrangements. It includes an understanding of the elements of and workings of not for profit organizations, strategies in effective management and the role of not for profit organizations in the economy.

NPM 651/PM 741: Fundraising & Development for Nonprofit Organizations

The course provides an overview of sources of funding for nonprofit organizations. It explains the fundraising manager’s role in development planning and focuses on mechanisms for raising money, including donor profiles, foundation and corporate philanthropy, government grant and contract programs, special events, marketing and public relations functions, direct mail and membership campaigns, planned giving, major gifts and capital campaigns. Ethical and legal issues related to fundraising are also addressed.

NPM 652/MPA 602: Human Resource Management in Nonprofit Organizations

Students will discuss an overview of human resource management in the public and nonprofit sectors. The course is designed to assist students identify established traditional and contemporary human resource management theories and suggest how these concepts can be incorporated into their management practice. The course provides students with an understanding of human resource management methods and functions including recruitment, labor relations, compensation, volunteer management and training and the legal environment. The course will also discuss cultural aspects of human resource management, ethical considerations, strategic planning, technology and regulatory issues. Students will be encouraged to identify current challenges in public and nonprofit human resource management and explore solutions to these concerns.

NPM 653/MPA 603: Financial Management in Nonprofit Organizations

This course offers students interdisciplinary knowledge of financial management concepts and techniques required for effective management of non-profit social service organizations. It provides specialized knowledge that is fundamental to help future non-profit leaders and staff adapt the organization to its ever changing fiscal environment. Topics include non-profit accounting, budget management, revenue forecasting, financial statements/reports tax issues, grant compliance, internal expenditure control, audits, cash flow management, long-term planning, endowment management, and capital financing. Building on the foundation knowledge gained in NMP 650, specific applications to financial issues in non-profit and public health and human services are also addressed.

NPM 654/MPA 626: Legal, Ethical & Governance Issues in Nonprofit Organizations

This course examines the laws affecting the establishment and operation of nonprofit organizations, including incorporation and tax exempt status, general liability, regulatory compliance/reporting and contracts. The course explores the roles, responsibilities, processes and powers of boards of directors including issues of board liability. The nonprofit agency’s advocacy responsibilities and opportunities and ethical issues are examined and discussed.

FORENSIC SOCIAL WORK CONCENTRATION

Forensic Social Work and the Criminal and Juvenile Justice Systems (3 credits)

The course provides an overview of the specialty of forensic social work and its interface with the criminal justice system, from arrest to sentencing and conviction. Legal and ethical aspects of professional practice, including issues associated with competency of the accused as well as the preparation of the presentence forensic evaluation. The debate regarding punishment versus rehabilitation is explored along with a multi-systemic perspective on the causes and prevention of crime and juvenile misconduct. Their interface with sexual, religious, racial and other sub-group involvement will also be discussed and realized.

Interviewing, Evaluating and Offering Treatment as a Forensic Social Worker (3 credits)

The clinical overview leading to an accurate understanding of the underpinnings of the pathology which led to the involvement in the judicial system is a critical part to the successful practice of forensic social work. This course scrutinizes this vital component of the forensic social work process. The course also focuses on separating the various components associated with the forensic social work role, e.g. tasks and potential ethical conflicts. The principles of generalist and clinical practice are applied to the assessment and treatment of individuals charged with a range of criminal and juvenile offenses with special attention to the specific issues associated with sentencing, diagnosis, incarceration, and release. Macro tasks related to mediating the needs of individuals and the purposes of institutions are also addressed.

Forensic Social Work with Drug and Alcohol Populations in the Criminal and Juvenile Justice Systems (3 credits)

The course focuses on the role of the Forensic social worker in drug and alcohol related treatment and crime. Heroin, cocaine, marijuana, prescription drugs, “club drugs” (i.e. MDMA, etc.), and alcohol will be placed under a clinical microscope. Different drugs are sought by different populations of people which generally lead to different types of criminal activity. The impact of drug and alcohol abusing offenders’ behavior on their children will also be explored. The legal and ethical issues associated with the forensic social work population are explored. Attention is focused on the relationship and potential role conflicts between social work practice and 12 step self-help programs.

Forensic Social Work and Domestic Violence – Legal, Cultural, Ethnic and Religious Issues in the Criminal and Juvenile Justice Systems (3 credits)

The course focuses on the role of the forensic social worker in understanding, assessing, preventing, and managing domestic violence. The cyclical nature of domestic violence and its association with alcohol and substance abuse is addressed with special attention to the needs of adult children of alcoholics who often perpetuate a pattern of violent behavior which leads to intergenerational involvement with criminal and juvenile justice systems. The course incorporates a multi-systemic perspective with an emphasis on assessing and treating the perpetrator, as well as the victims of domestic violence and also focuses on the forensic social worker’s role in impacting the institutions associated with the efforts to reduce domestic violence.