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Course Descriptions

Required and Elective Courses in Public Relations (listed alphabetically)

BDST 11 Production Tools I-Audio

This course introduces the student to the basics of audio and web production. Students work with a faculty member to master the basics of audio instruction, which will include an introduction to principles of sound, audio formats, analog vs. digital recording, editing, Use of different microphone types. Remote equipment use and studio production will be covered.

Every Semester, 3 credits

BDST 12 Production Tools II-Video

This course introduces the student to basic skills in video and web production. Specifically, it includes the three camera switched live-to-tape shoot, three camera set up, blocking, microphones, soundboard operation, levels and creating a rundown. It will also introduce single camera production, including shot composition, camera movement, preproduction, postproduction, storyboarding and scripting.

Every Semester, 3 credits

CMA 2 Mass Media in American Society

This course will introduce the student to ways of thinking critically and historically about the media culture that surrounds us and to ways of understanding the complex relationships among media, society and the individual through the 20th century to the present. Rather than covering media exhaustively, this class will examine a number of interesting and revealing examples drawn from various media and changing time periods, focusing on how our culture has adapted media from radio to Twitter to its needs and desires.

Every Semester, 3 credits

CMA 4 Media Literacy: Behind the Message

Becoming media literate means developing an understanding of how various media, both print and electronic, formulate and deliver their messages. This course gives the student the critical and analytical skills needed to interpret media messages and understand their effects on audiences. It also serves an introduction to the concepts and terms involved in analysis of media messages as a foundation for further study in this field. The student will also learn several media theories and see illustrations of their application in current media coverage. Such theoretical constructs include propaganda, influences on perception, media effects on the individual, media effects on society and institutions, and agenda-setting.
Every Semester, 3 credits

CMA 5 Writing in the Digital Age

This class will introduce you to the various writing styles and formats practiced in the media industry and will cover the basic assignments in journalism, public relations, advertising and broadcasting. We will also work on improving your writing by reviewing essential grammar rules, AP style rules, and the writing process used by all good media writers. Our focus will be on developing clear messages, analyzing your own writing as well as other writing, and learning how to proofread and edit copy. We will produce basic examples of various written communications practiced in the field, from journalism articles, to press releases, ad copy, and radio & television scripts for inclusion in a portfolio.
Prerequisite of ENG 3 (C+ or better) is required, except for students in an Arts Management major or English Writing Sub-plan.
Every Semester, 3 credits

CMA 10 Media Law and Ethics

This course examines the legal and ethical responsibilities of professionals working in print, electronic and new media. Students are introduced to the legal framework that supports freedom of speech and freedom of the press and examine the current laws of libel, invasion of privacy, copyright and newsgathering, as well as FCC and other telecommunications regulations. Students also examine ethical codes that guide media professionals and study conflicts that arise when legal and ethical principles conflict with real-world dilemmas.
Every Semester, 3 credits

MKT 11 Marketing Principles and Practices

This is the core-marketing course for the Long Island University Undergraduate Program and it also appeals to non-business-majors who are interested in marketing. The aim of the course is to provide a rigorous and comprehensive introduction to contemporary marketing practice. The participants learn how to analyze complex business situations, identify underlying problems and decide on courses of actions with the help of the modern marketing management techniques. The students learn the concepts and terminology of modern marketing management during lectures, cases and class discussions. Application of the marketing management concepts becomes the focus for the term project.
Every Semester, 3 credits

ORC 1 Public Speaking

Principles of speech composition and public address with emphasis on effective speaking and fundamentals of voice and diction are covered in this course. Students prepare and deliver short speeches to their peers.
Every Semester, 3 credits

ORC 17 Speech Communication in Organizations

The principles of effective speech communication in business, professional, governmental and community organizations are examined and practiced. The emphasis is on the public address, the use of media and other visual aids, the informative report, group and sales presentations, conducting and participating in an open meeting.
Every Semester, 3 credits

PR 1 Introduction to Public Relations

A survey of basic public relations principles including definitions, management models and procedures that are standard for the profession. Careers and the functions of PR professionals within organizations, nonprofit or corporate, and governmental agencies are covered. The history of public relations in the United States, legal aspects, historical figures, audiences, business planning, media relations and research techniques are included.
Prerequisites: ENG 1 and 2, Every Semester, 3 credits

PR 2 Writing and Editing for Public Relations

Public relations writing and techniques designed to obtain publicity are explored in this course. Students develop the analytical and writing skills required in the field. This writing course covers the styles and approaches required for writing press releases, photo captions, backgrounders, pubic service announcements, and media alerts. It covers what makes news, types of stories that interest media, and media information in general. Media and message targeting to appropriate audiences are examined and evaluated through the preparation of a press kit.
Co-requisite: PR 1, Every Semester, 3 credits

PR 7 Media Relations

This course is a study of strategies used by organizations to capture media attention. Topics include news releases, photographic feeds, news conferences, interviews, media tours and special events for print and electronic media. Local and global aspects are included as well as metrics for measurement. 
Same as CMA7
Prerequisite: PR 1, On occasion, 3 credits

PR 11 Community Relations and Corporate Social Responsibility

This course spans the preparation and management of public relations initiatives in the community through the nonprofit and corporate sectors. The various constituent community groups are examined and sometimes guests are invited to the class for specific discussions. Development of regional, national and global events and campaigns for corporate and nonprofit partnerships as part of corporate social responsibility or CSR programs also are covered.
Prerequisite: PR 2, On Occasion, 3 credits

PR 12 Publicity and the Personality

Techniques and strategies used to gain public support for the individual, such as a company president or media personality. How spokespersons are selected and used to project policy are examined along with the use of techniques, such as interview and speech opportunities, and gossip column reports.
Prerequisite: PR 2, On Occasion, 3 credits

PR 13 Marketing Promotion

This course covers persuasive communication and promotion in marketing, along with the assessment, formulation and allocation of priorities in the promotional campaign.
Same as MKT 35, Prerequisites: PR 2 and MKT 11, On Occasion, 3 credits

PR 14 Creating Special Events

The planning and execution of special events (parades, plant tours, sports events, fundraisers, and anniversary celebrations) as they are used in a public relations program. The history of “stunt” publicity and its relevance in today’s public relations climate is discussed. Prerequisite: PR 2, On Occasion, 3 credits

PR 15 Political Public Relations

This course explores the preparation, research and planning of communications efforts on behalf of political candidates and elected officials. Analysis and creation of speeches, special events, advertising, social media, data mining, and publicity are covered in the context of various media as well as in face-to-face situations.
Prerequisite: PR 2, On Occasion, 3 credits

PR 19 Public Relations in the Marketing Mix

This course provides an understanding of integrating the strategies and tools used by professionals in marketing a product or idea, increasing sales, changing an organization's reputation or positioning an organization. Students are part of a public relations team and learn how to prepare a market-oriented communications plan.
Prerequisite: PR 2, On Occasion, 3 credits

PR 20 Case Studies in Public Relations

This course provides an overview of problems and opportunities facing the profession, helps the student identify public relations initiatives, and introduces current problem-solving practices and evaluation procedures. Public relations campaigns are analyzed through a management approach that stresses strategic planning and implementation techniques. The course combines management's decision-making initiatives.
Prerequisite: PR 2, Every Semester, 3 credits

PR 22 Digital Public Relations

The course acquaints the student with new tools and techniques of this rapidly evolving field from a production and technology point of view. It integrates writing with digital image, electronic media production and presentation, and graphic arts technologies, while monitoring change. Also included are monitoring change in public opinion social media technologies.
Prerequisite: PR 2, On Occasion, 3 credits

PR 23 Sports Public Relations

The role of publicity and public relations as analyzed and practiced in relation to professional teams, leagues, colleges and venues is the focus of this course. Class work is supplemented by on-site visits and visitors.
On Occasion, 3 credits

PR 25 The Business of Public Relations

Introduces the business side of public relations from the agency (consultant), in-house department (corporate, nonprofit or association) and entrepreneurial perspectives. In addition to business basics, practical knowledge of budgeting, billing, timesheets, research techniques, client/new business presentations, tracking methods and client relations are explored. The course develops writing and thinking skills essential to securing new business through the proposal preparation.

Prerequisite: PR 2, or permission of the program director.

 Annually, 3 credits

PR 29 Propaganda and Persuasion

An overview of the theories and history of propaganda and persuasion are explored in this course to prepare the student to recognize public relations uses of rhetoric and propaganda in today's messages and communication. Negative and positive aspects are analyzed.
Prerequisite: PR 1, Co-requisite: PR 2, Annually, 3 credits

PR 30 Using Business Software in Public Relations/Advertising

In addition to a hands-on introduction to the various software programs used by communications professionals, this course introduces practical computer skills and applies word processing, database and spreadsheet operations to a communications program developed by the student. The focus is on advertising buys, editorial pitches, media research and list development that takes advantage of word processing formats, merge mailing capability, master calendar reports, and budgeting that culminates in a computer-based media detailed plan and program summary.
Co-requisites: PR 1, 2, Every Semester, 3 credits

PR 35 Communication Design for Public Relations

This course introduces the student to an integrated typography and graphic program to produce and publish a newsletter. Practical knowledge is combined with an exploration of design, typographical principles and message effectiveness. The evaluation and assessment of the visual impact of the output is stressed as part of the creative learning experience. Students research articles, conduct interviews, collect photographs, write and design a multi-page newsletter.
Prerequisite: PR 2, On Occasion, 3 credits

PR 36 Digital Marketing Tools

Though the study and practice of real online scenarios, students learn how online businesses apply strategic online tactics to increase revenue, drive traffic, and provide prospective consumers with a service or information. This course provides an understanding of the internet and online business, as well as a wide variety of internet operations, such as search engine optimization, search engine marketing, email marketing, SEO PR, viral marketing, social media, networking and other innovative strategies and measurements.
Co-requisite: PR 2, Annually, 3 credits

PR 38 Social Media Tools

Social networks like Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram have become platforms for brands and organizations to connect and communicate directly with their audiences and are now integral parts of well-rounded public relations campaigns. Students will learn about the various networks and apps available, how to leverage them effectively using best practices, and strategically integrate these platforms into an overall communications plan with appropriate listening and measurement metrics.
Prerequisite: PR 2
 or permission of program director. Annually, 3 credits

PR 40 Topics in Public Relations

Advanced special topics in public relations focusing on contemporary developments in the fields are examined in this course. Subjects are announced when a special course runs in a semester.
Prerequisites of PR 1 & 2 or permission of program director is required. On Occasion, 3 credits

PR 42 Applied Public Relations

Applied public relations prepares the student for real work assignments through participation in project opportunities, including Business Etiquette Workshops, Open Lunches, Public Relations Explorations Forum, officer roles, and other assignments through part of the experience of LIU Post's chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA).
Co-requisite: PR 2 and permission of the program director, Every Semester, 3 credits

PR 43 Applied Public Relations

This applied public relations course continues preparation of the student for real work assignments through participation in project opportunities, including Business Etiquette Workshops, Open Lunches, Public Relations Explorations Forum, officer roles, and other assignments through part of the experience of LIU Post's chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA).
Prerequisite: PR 42 and permission of the program director. Every Semester, 3 credits

PR 44 Applied Public Relations

This applied public relations course continues preparation of the student for real work assignments through participation , including Business Etiquette Workshops, Open Lunches, Public Relations Explorations Forum, officer roles, and other assignments through part of the exerience of LIU Post’s chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA).
Prerequisite: PR 43 and permission of program director required. Every Semester, 3 credits

PR 45 Writing for Corporate Communications

The student is introduced to the full spectrum of writing tasks as a business professional in corporate communications. The writing of important communications, such as memos, letters, speeches, bios, position papers, newsletters, and email blasts are the focus of assignments. Annual reports, direct mail, product descriptions, brochures and proposals are explored.
Prerequisite: PR 2, On Occasion, 3 credits

PR 47 Advanced PR Writing

To write effective copy in a variety of formats to reach the media and public(s) truly is at the heart of public relations activities. This advanced public relations writing course helps students match the media/public with appropriate messages. Identification of opportunities for targeted communications is stressed, together with content development and style. Students develop and mesh these abilities to write sharp, analytical and persuasive public relations communications. Prerequisite: PR 2, On Occasion, 3 credits

PR 53 Introduction to Advertising

This introductory course surveys the field of advertising from its historical development and importance. Multiple media platforms from billboards to digital strategies are explored for understanding the needs of institutional, product, political, public service and corporate advertising implementation. The role of the agency or in-house department and decision alternatives for cost-effective, yet results-oriented advertising also are covered. Research techniques, artistic considerations, as well as ethical and legal implications are explored.
Prerequisite: PR 2, On Occasion, 3 credits

PR 54 Writing For Advertising

This course introduces the writing and creative perspectives required for advertising programs. Components of audience, message and medium are explored for cost-effective yet results-oriented implementation of institutional, product, political, public service and corporate advertising. Headline, text copy, dynamic visual concepts for various media platforms as well as effective storyboarding and spot production are covered.
Prerequisite: PR2, On Occasion, 3 credits

PR 55 Advertising Campaigns

This course presents an overview of advertising, and then examines advertising strategies in the formulation of campaigns from how markets are segmented and types of media available with a focus on campaign themes and divergent material. This class will develop sensitivity to visual and written materials through an analysis and attention to the formulation of ideas, putting ideas to paper and completing campaigns.
Prerequisite: PR 2, On Occasion, 3 credits

PR 56 Branding: Integrating Communication

Students explore how brands create a name for themselves in a marketplace that is national or global to stand out from the competition. At the same time, students look at how little brands became big ones and how they stay big, whether they are Disney, Starbucks, Coke, Oprah, Martha, J-LO, or even The Donald. This course looks at what defines a brand, implementation strategies, differentiation between brands, media adopted and measurements of effectiveness.
Prerequisite: PR 2, On Occasion, 3 credits

PR 62 Arts & Entertainment Promotion

Students will learn the methods and tools of publicists, press agents, and public relations practictioners for the arts, cultural and entertainment organizations, as well as theories of promotion using social media, traditional publicity, special events and programming development to increase audience awareness, participation, and funding.
Requisites: Open to PR and ARM students only, Co-requisite: PR2 for PR majors. On Occasion, 3 credits

PR 65 Introduction to Crisis Communications

This course is an introductory study of responses to crisis situations through best practices and examples. What is a crisis and the role of communication is examined. How to prepare a plan, assemble a team, designate an information spokesperson, and address the publics affected by the crisis also are covered, while role playing and simulated crisis exercises expand the experience for students. Also included is how to unify messages, evaluate public perceptions and assess results.
Prerequisite: PR 2, On Occasion, 3 credits

PR 67 Applied Public Relations: Department Media

This course is a practicum for students who wish to gain experience in using their writing and publicity skills for promotion of WCWP-Web radio, WCWP.FM, PTV, the Pioneer, Open Lunches, and the Public Relations Explorations Forum. Not open to students who enrolled in PR68, BDST 67/68.
Prerequisite: PR 2, Every Semester, 3 credits

PR 70 Research and Evaluation in Public Relations

Research and evaluation are critical to the public relations process. After learning about authoritative databases and sources of information, students learn how to use and cite information by defining and connecting their findings in strategic and analytical writing. Using quantitative and qualitative methodologies, they also evaluate the courses of action available, develop surveys for opinion research, and analyze performance to determine how a program of action should be developed, what audiences should be targeted, appropriate message development, and ultimately if a program has met desired goals. The integration of research throughout the public relations planning process is stressed.
Prerequisite: PR 2, Every Semester, 3 credits

PR 87 Internship I

This internship opportunity permits the advanced student to supplement classroom instruction with real-world experience. After preparation of a resume for review by the faculty mentor, the student selects an appropriate internship geared to the individual student's interests and abilities. The student works at least 120 hours per semester, with times arranged by the student and employer. Meetings with a faculty mentor, reports, and a final paper are required. Prerequisite: PR 2, Junior or Senior status in good standing in Public Relations with permission of the program director.
Every Semester, 3 credits

PR 88 Internship II

This internship opportunity permits the advanced student to supplement classroom instruction with real-world experience. After preparation of a resume for review by the faculty mentor, the student can select a second, but different, internship geared to the individual student's interests and abilities. The student works at least 120 hours per semester, with times arranged by the student and employer. Meetings with a faculty mentor, reports, and a final paper are required.
Prerequisite: PR 87, Junior or Senior status in good standing in Public Relations with permission of the program director. Every Semester, 3 credits

PR89 Advanced Independent Study in PR

This independent course is an individual, faculty-guided study of a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the faculty mentor, only when students cannot fulfill credit requirements through scheduled classes. The student meets regularly with the faculty mentor to discuss progress. Permission of the program director required.
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status in good standing in Public Relations with permission of the program director, Every Semester, 1, 2 or 3 credits

PR 91 Public Relations Senior Research and Seminar*

This two-semester capstone begins with this course in which the student develops a substantive body of written research. It deals with a public relations organization of interest to the student and provides extensive research on the organization, industry, competition and consumer trends to formulate target audiences and background information. Regular conferences with and submissions to the faculty mentor are integral to the course, along with seminar attendance. Students must achieve a B- or better in the capstones and cannot take both in one semester.

Prerequisites: Senior status in Public Relations, PR 20, PR 70, Co-requisite: PR 25, Every Semester, 3 credits

PR 92 Public Relations Senior Project, Portfolio and Seminar*

Using the research carried out in PR 91, the culminating part of the two-semester capstone experience involves the development of a public relations campaign tied to a specific audience and its research. This campaign uses planning models, develops objectives, messages, and suggested programs. Ultimately, several programs are planned in full to solve a public relations problem or need, change an attitude, introduce a new product, or increase awareness of a product or service or organization. A portfolio and AP exam also are required. Regular conferences with and submissions to the faculty mentor are integral to the course, along with seminar attendance. Students must achieve a B- or better in the capstones and cannot take both in one semester.

 
Prerequisites: Senior status in Public Relations, PR 91., Every Semester, 4 credits
*PR 91 and PR 92 may not be taken in the same semester

Though Public Relations courses with a PR prefix are preferred, students may use the following department courses to substitute for a PR Elective requirement when there are schedule conflicts:

CMA 40T Telecommunications Policy & PR
CMA 40W Women in Media
CMA 94 Multimedia Project

In addition, students may choose one of the following courses in the Art Department and use it for PR Elective credit:

ART 4 or CPGH 16 Photoshop
ART 30 Photography
CGPH 5 Layout design for non-majors
CGPH 26 Web design for non-majors