Contact Us

Course Schedule and Descriptions

COURSE SCHEDULE AND DESCRIPTIONS
SUMMER COLLEGE 2013

JUNE 24- JULY 26

CIN 11 HISTORY OF WORLD CINEMA (CLASS # 1041)

A concise history of film from its origins in the 1890s to the present is covered. Silent and sound films from around the world are screened and discussed each week. For non-majors only, fine arts core requirement.
Faculty: John Mainente
Department of Theatre, Film and Dance
June 24-July 26
Monday-Wednesday, 12:10 pm-2:50 pm

ECO 11 INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS (CLASS # 1255)

This course discusses the important economic theory and concepts that facilitate understating economic theories and concepts that facilitate understanding economic events and questions. Its main focus is on analyzing the behavior of important economic aggregates such as national income, unemployment, inflation, interest rates, exchange rates and economic growth. The effects of the governments' monetary and fiscal policies on economic growth and inflation are also examined.
Faculty: Panos Mourdoukoutas
Department of Economics
June 24-July 26
Monday-Thursday, 4:15 pm-6:10 pm

HIS 3 AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 1607-1877 (CLASS # 1394)

A survey of major political, social, economic, and cultural changes in the area that is now the United States from initial colonization through the end of Reconstruction.
Faculty: Martin Saltzman
Department of History and Political Science
June 24-July 26
Monday-Thursday, 8 am-9:55 am

HIS 4 AMERICAN CIVILIZATION SINCE 1877 (CLASS # 1057)

A general survey of political, economic, social and cultural changes in the United States from the end of Reconstruction to the present. Examines the emergence of America as a world power by the turn of the 20th century and its position as world's only superpower by the end of the end of century. Topics include: growth of diverse, urban society, the struggles of those seeking quality and inclusion in quest for the "American Dream," the emergence of mass society, U.S. and the two world wars, the Cold War, and the use of U.S. military power.
Faculty: Christopher Mauceri
Department of History and Political Science
June 24-July 26
Monday-Thursday, 10:05 am-12 noon

POL 1 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE 1 (CLASS # 1226)

This Course is an analysis of the nature of the state, political power, law sovereignty and political ideologies. The stress is on analysis of contemporary concepts.
Faculty: Michael Soupios
Department of History and Political Science
June 24-July 26
Monday-Thursday, 4 pm-5:50 pm

POL 2 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE 2 (CLASS # 1055)

This course introduces the study of the Constitutional structure, major functions and operations of the national government.
Faculty: Michael Soupios
Department of History and Political Science
June 24-July 26
Monday-Thursday, 6 pm-7:50 pm

ECO 46 CURRENT ECONOMIC ISSUES: ECONOMICS FOR INVESTORS (CLASS #1414)

This course introduces students to the basics of investing. You will learn to apply fundamental economic concepts and theories of key elements of investing including asset allocation and portfolio selection. The course is built around a virtual trading room, where students get to invest $500,000 with the goal of outperforming the major market indices.
Faculty: Panos Mourdoukoutas
Department of Economics
June 24-July 26
Monday-Thursday, 1 pm-2:55 pm

ENG 1 COMPOSITION (CLASS # 1511)

English 1 is an introductory writing course that uses interpretation and analysis of texts to promote clear thinking and effective prose. Students learn the conventions of academic writing. In addition, students learn how to adapt writing for various audiences and rhetorical situations. This course is required of all students unless exempted by Advanced Placement credit or successful achievement on the SAT examination in writing.
Faculty: David Shikmin
Department of English
June 24-July 26
Monday-Thursday, 10:05 am - 12 pm

July 29 – August 30

HIS 3 AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 1607-1877 (CLASS # 1020)

A survey of major political, social, economic, and cultural changes in the area that is now the United States from initial colonization through the end of Reconstruction.
Faculty: Christopher Mauceri
Department of History and Political Science
July 29-August 30
Monday-Thursday, 10:05 am-12:00 pm

PHI 8 BEGINNING PHILOSOPHY (CLASS # 1291)

This course is an introductory exploration of basic issues raised by the great philosophers. Readings focus on questions about human nature, God, knowledge, values, meaning and purpose.
Faculty: Michael Russo
Department of Philosophy
July 29-August 30
Monday-Thursday, 10:05 am-12 pm

PHI 13 ETHICS & SOCIETY (CLASS # 2506)

This course is an introduction to human values that focuses on such ethical, social and aesthetic questions as: What is the basis of right and wrong? How can one gain knowledge of good and evil? How do we judge beauty? What do we mean by justice? What makes life worth living?
Faculty: Mark Russo
Department of Philosophy
July 29-August 30
Monday-Thursday, 1 pm-3:30 pm

POL 2 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE 2 (CLASS # 1015)

This course introduces the study of the Constitutional structure, major functions and operations of the national government.
Faculty: Melchiore Laucella
Department of History and Political Science
July 29-August 30
Monday-Thursday, 4:30 pm-6:25 pm

ENG 2 COMPOSITION: ARGUMENT AND ANALYSIS (CLASS # 1420)

English 2 is a course in analysis and argumentation, focusing on scholarly research and documentation. Building on the work begun in English 1, the course develops knowledge of complex rhetorical and stylistic techniques and culminates in a library research paper. No Pass/Fail option
Faculty: Steven Williams
Department of English
July 29-August 30
Monday-Thursday, 10:05 am-12 noon