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Course Description

GCHI 310 Modern Chinese History (3 units)

This course surveys modern Chinese history and the origins of nationalism. Students explore how China transformed from the insular “Central Kingdom” to an influential member of the world community and a dynamic force in the world economy in little more than one century. The course concentrates on recent Chinese history and the relationship between China and the West including the collapse of the imperial system under Western intellectual influences and military pressure, the national movements in the wake of foreign invasions, and communist rule following the Second World War.

GCHI 311 Experiential Learning in a Chinese Context (2 units)

This course accompanies the placement of students in internships or service learning contexts in LIU Global’s China programs. Although the specific details will vary according to the organization with which students are placed, all students undergo a formal process of preparation, documentation, reflection and analysis as they plan and complete their experiential project. Students work closely with their advisors to set goals, to articulate their projects’ relationship to their larger professional and personal aspirations, and to document the outcomes of the experience in a graded written paper.

GCHI 312 Heritage and Innovation (2 units)

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the learning environment surrounding Hangzhou through a cultivated geographic survey. Situated in the richest part of the Yangzi Delta and along the 2000-year-old Grand Canal, this region, China’s most dynamic zone of economic development, has been a cultural hub since before Marco Polo’s visit here in the 13th century. Class is designed around excursions throughout the Jiangnan region, including some of Hangzhou’s best known historical sites, Suzhou, Shaoxing and modern Shanghai. Each trip will be accompanied by assigned readings and classroom discussion, with the purpose of seeing how cultural heritage is redesigned and promoted in the framework of international tourism and how traditional norms are altered by the market economy.

GCHI 317 Topics in Chinese Society and Change (3 units)

This course will survey social and cultural changes in the past 40 years. The students will be challenged to understand what happened in the period of the Cultural Revolution and those during the post-Mao era by focusing on gender issues and family structure. Students are expected to explore the meaning and the significance of these changes within the structure of the traditional Chinese culture and from the perspective of encountering the culture from abroad..

GCHI 322 Intensive Mandarin Chinese: Fall Semester (8 units)

Intensive Mandarin Chinese is designed for the beginning students and focuses on the full range of linguistic competencies, including speaking, listening skills in Mandarin as well as beginning reading and writing of Chinese characters. Students will learn pin yin and focus on learning tones early in the semester and then move on to vocabulary acquisition and basic character recognition and writing. Students with previous exposure to Chinese can begin from a level corresponding to their proficiency.

GCHI 323 Intensive Mandarin Chinese: Spring Semester (6 units)

This course is a continuation of GCHI 322. Students continue comprehensive study of spoken and written Chinese. The goal of this class is to provide students with the listening skills and speaking fluency necessary to communicate with Chinese peers, faculty and the surrounding community generally as well as a level of character recognition that provides the basis for students to navigate maps, street signs, markets and travel with confidence independently in China. For students with beginning Chinese, or for those who are already proficient, various levels are possible from which the course could begin.

GCHI 330 Ethnic Minority Studies (3 units)

This course will introduce students to the 55 official minority nationalities of China and their integration and development in the last fifty years, which includes the colonial and assimilative pressure applied by the Han majority. The focus will be on issues such as education, tourism, and government policies that cause the 'loss' of traditional minority cultures while also providing greater avenues for the promotion of local ethnic culture through economic development and connections with the outside world.

GCHI 361 Chinese Martial Arts (1 unit)

This course will introduce students to the traditional Chinese longevity exercise of Yang style taijiquan, soft-style Chinese martial arts. While the content of the course will be determined to some extent by an assessment of the students’ abilities and interests, in general, during the Fall-semester students will be taught the long form with 42 movements. Spring semester students, again, in accordance with student abilities and interests, will learn the short form with 24 movements, which is the Chinese national standard form first promulgated in 1956 by the National Physical Culture and Sports Commission of the People’s Republic of China in Beijing. These forms are based on the longer 108 movements of the Yang family style taught by Yang Luchan (1799-1872) to the Imperial Guards of the Manchu Court during the Qing dynasty. Taiji is a Daoist cosmological term that means “supreme ultimate” and Quan means “fist.” The actual number of movements taught to a specific student will be determined by the progress made through the semester. In addition, in both semesters, the specific style will be determined by the instructor’s assessment of the students’ abilities as well as consultation with the students about their own goals and interests.

GCHI 362 Chinese Martial Arts (1 unit)

This course will introduce students to the traditional Chinese longevity exercise of Yang style taijiquan, soft-style Chinese martial arts. While the content of the course will be determined to some extent by an assessment of the students’ abilities and interests, in general, during the Fall-semester students will be taught the long form with 42 movements. Spring semester students, again, in accordance with student abilities and interests, will learn the short form with 24 movements, which is the Chinese national standard form first promulgated in 1956 by the National Physical Culture and Sports Commission of the People’s Republic of China in Beijing. These forms are based on the longer 108 movements of the Yang family style taught by Yang Luchan (1799-1872) to the Imperial Guards of the Manchu Court during the Qing dynasty. Taiji is a Daoist cosmological term that means “supreme ultimate” and Quan means “fist.” The actual number of movements taught to a specific student will be determined by the progress made through the semester. In addition, in both semesters, the specific style will be determined by the instructor’s assessment of the students’ abilities as well as consultation with the students about their own goals and interests.

GCHI 342-3, 390-399, 423-4, 490-99 Independent Study (variable units)

Students may design a guided independent study project (ISP) with their faculty advisor and/or field advisor. Field advisors are professionals and specialists who can offer students more in-depth study of a chosen field through an ISP or specially arranged lectures and courses. In consultation with the advisor and field advisor (if one is assigned) students will create a proposal as part of their learning plan that will include specific learning goals, internship or service learning placements (if appropriate), methods to be undertaken, reading and written assignments, places (if any) to be visited and a timeline for completing the course. The learning goals must be consistent with the student’s abilities (language, methodological etc.) as determined by the advisor in consultation with the student. First-semester students may not take more than a total of four credits and second semester students may not take more than a total of eight credits of independent studies without permission from their faculty advisor and the support of the academic director.

GNYC 202 Strategies and Uses for Digital Communication. Fall 2014, online
elective seminar for all LIU Global students (2 units)

This online seminar provides students with a critical and strategic approach to social media communication, exploring its role in today’s world and translating their current academic work into digital communications. Students will examine the history and significance of digital media, learn to formulate a communication strategy, identify the strategic uses of different social media, and compare the unique writing requirements for diverse social media (blog, post, webpage, news, video, app). This course will also be very practical so that students have an opportunity to develop and apply their digital communication skills through projects that relate to their other coursework and that support their academic and career goals, such as producing a video and writing a news story. By the end of the course, students will combine their acquired skills and tools, including their Digication portfolio and professional profile in LinkedIn, to present their work in an attractive and effective way.

GNYC 318 Global Studies III: Theories, Issues and Solutions (3 units)

The objective of Global Studies III: Theories, Issues, Solutions is to orient students to the theories of globalization and use them to shed light on the major issues faced collectively by humanity. Students will acquire a basic understanding of the way major thinkers in economics, political science, environmental science and cultural studies articulate the acute issues characteristic of the Global Age. Students will also learn how these same disciplinary perspectives may contribute to policy, entrepreneurial and advocacy solutions. Students will complete a project focused on a global issues that is of specific interest to them, developing their own interdisciplinary bibliography and a literature review that prepares them for their Senior Independent Study (SIS) semester and their Senior Thesis. The course's review of global issues will be tied to field experiences in the center or program in which the course is delivered.

GNYC 340 Junior Research Seminar (2 units)

This online required course provides students with the skills and knowledge necessary to research, organize and write a thesis proposal as well as a fully developed research paper that incorporates multiple primary and secondary resources that students evaluate according to the pyramid of sources and through critical readings. Students also learn to narrow down a general topic into a manageable project, organize it through scheduling, notes and interviews, and become familiar with the various ways of citing sources and avoiding plagiarism. This course is a prerequisite for the Independent Study Semester.