M.S. in Homeland Security Management


Designated by Congress as a US Department of Homeland Security Center of Excellence, the Homeland Security and Terrorism Institute (HSTI) provides an exceptional graduate-level education to working professionals as well as to those aspiring to a career in the Homeland Security or Homeland Defense fields. The Nation's premier graduate program in the Homeland Security and Homeland Defense field, the Institute offers a fully online 30-credit Master of Science degree in Homeland Security Management. Our curriculum provides advanced knowledge, insight, and skills in homeland security management to law enforcement professionals, emergency managers, fire fighters, homeland security specialists, HazMat experts, military personnel, government and public safety officials, and corporate security professionals as well as students new to the field. HSTI graduates are among the best-trained and most sought-after law enforcement officers, managers and executives in the world.

The Homeland Security and Terrorism Institute's exceptional faculty, outstanding curriculum and solid commitment to the highest academic and professional standards ensure a rigorous and academically challenging graduate education that is designed and delivered by professionals for professionals.


Admissions Requirements

Applicants to the M.S. in Homeland Security Management must meet the following requirements for admission. Applications for admission are accepted on a rolling basis.

  • Application for Admission
  • A bachelor's degree with a minimum GPA of 3.0 from an accredited college or university or successful completion of another master's degree. Applicants who have attended institutions outside the United States must hold a degree equivalent to a U.S. bachelor's degree.
  • Official copies of your undergraduate and/or graduate transcripts from any college(s) or universities you have attended.
  • Two professional letters of recommendation
  • Personal Statement/Essay
  • Students for whom English is a second language must submit official score results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The required minimum acceptable TOEFL score is: 79 Internet-based (213 computer-based or 550 paper-based) or minimum IELTS score: 6.5.

Submitting an Application for Admission

It is recommended that an Application for Admission to the Master of Science in Homeland Security Management program be submitted at least one month prior to the start of classes. All applications and requested materials (i.e. transcripts, letters of recommendation, personal statement) should be submitted to the Long Island University at Riverhead Graduate Admissions Office.

To apply for admission, please follow these steps.

1. LIU Online Application for Admission

Applicants must complete the LIU Online Application for Admission. The application can be obtained by clicking on the above link or selecting the Apply Now button in the upper right-hand corner of this page. A print version of the Application for Admission can be downloaded from our website in the Forms & Documents section. You can also request that a graduate application be mailed to you by calling 631-287-8010 or e-mailing riverhead@liu.edu.

2.Transcripts

Submit official undergraduate and/or graduate transcript with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. Applicants who will have not completed their degrees prior to admission should submit a transcript without the final semester's grades. Such applicants may be accepted pending receipt of their final degree noted transcripts. Submit one copy of official transcripts from all other institutions attended, including other graduate programs.

International students should refer to the International Admissions website for transcript requirements.

3. Letters of Recommendation

Submit two (2) professional letters of recommendation utilizing the HSMI Letter of Recommendation Form. This form may be found and downloaded from the Forms and Documents section of the website. The two professional letters of recommendation should address your potential for success in the profession and your ability to complete a graduate program. Letters of recommendation should be from an academic source, preferably a professor or academic official who is familiar with your academic history and achievement. If you have been out of school for several years, recommendations may come from your employer or supervisor. The references should be given the Letter of Recommendation signed by you, along with a stamped envelope addressed to:

Office of Admissions
LIU Riverhead
Long Island University Building
121 Speonk-Riverhead Road
Riverhead, New York 11901-3499

4. Personal Statement/Essay

You may use the essay portion of the online application to address your reasons for pursuing the program and what you expect to gain from it. Please include information about your background and professional experience in the essay. You may submit this statement as part of the Online Application for Admission, or follow at a later date as a hard copy. Contact the Office of Admissions at 631-287-8010 or riverhead@liu.edu to make arrangements if you prefer submit your personal statement/essay via email or mail.

5. International Students

In addition to the requirements listed above, international applicants must submit official score results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The required minimum acceptable TOEFL score is: 79 Internet-based (213 computer-based or 550 paper-based) or minimum IELTS score: 6.5. International students whose native language is English, or who have attended for at least two years an accredited College or University where the only medium of instruction is English, may have the English Language proficiency requirement waived. The waiver is determined on an individual basis following a review of the student's application.

Need Help With Your Admissions Application?

If you have any questions about the admissions application process or requirements, please contact the main LIU Riverhead office at 631-287-8010 or via email at riverhead@liu.edu.

Arrange to submit official college transcripts from all colleges attended to:

Office of Admissions
LIU Riverhead
Long Island University Building
121 Speonk-Riverhead Road
Riverhead, New York 11901-3499

Degree Requirements

The online M.S. in Homeland Security Management consists of a total 30 credits, distributed as follows:

Homeland Security Core Courses (15 credits) *

HSTI 500 - Introduction to Homeland Security Management

HSTI 520 - Constitutional Issues in Homeland Security Management

HSTI 530 - Domestic and International Terrorism

HSTI 540 - The Intelligence Function in Homeland Security Management

HSTI 550 - Homeland Security and the Private Sector

OR

Cyber Security Policy Core Courses (15 credits) *

HSTI 500 - Introduction to Homeland Security Management

HSTI 520 - Constitutional Issues in Homeland Security Management

HSTI 535 - Cyber Security: Issues, Policy and Terrorism

HSTI 545 - Advanced Cyber Security Policy and Intelligence

HSTI 555 - Advanced Cyber Security: Technology Issues for Policy Makers

 Required Courses: (9 credits)

HSTI 600 - Emergency Management

HSTI 610 - Psychological and Sociological Aspects of Disaster and Terrorism

HSTI 620 - Research Design and Methods in Homeland Security Management

 Practicum: (3 credits)

HSTI 630 - Practicum: Graduate Internship in Homeland Security or

HSTI 640 - Practicum: Exercises in Homeland Security

Research: (3 credits)

HSTI 760 - Capstone Project**

 Total: 30 credits

* The 15 credits of either the Homeland Security core or the Cyber Security policy core form the core curriculum of the 30-credit Master of Science degree in Homeland Security Management.

** HSTI 760 - Capstone Project, must be taken in the student's final semester.

***A grade of incomplete [I or INC] indicates that some of the course requirements have not been completed. In other words, there is the assumption that the student has contacted the professor and began his/her work for the class in question. If the student cannot complete the rest of his/her requirements for the class in question in the official time allotted for the semester, then the student can request in writing a grade of incomplete. The latter will only be granted for extraordinary reasons not for extra time to complete the requirements of the class.

An Unofficial Withdrawal (UW) refers to a student who fails to attend or ceases to attend one or more classes without officially withdrawing from the University. The course is recorded on the student’s transcript with a grade of UW.

 

Course Descriptions

Students must select either the 15-credit Homeland Security or 15-credit Cyber Security Policy core for the Master of Science in Homeland Security Management.

M.S. in Homeland Security Management (30 credits)

HSTI 500 - Introduction to Homeland Security Management

This introductory course surveys the major policies, practices, concepts and challenges confronting practitioners in the complex field of Homeland Security Management. The course provides an overview of various threats to domestic security from terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, and other related risks and vulnerabilities, examining the government and private sector organizations, strategies, and systems involved in protecting against and responding to these threats. Using a case study approach, the course focuses on the managerial, political, legal and organizational issues related to crisis planning and response, the National Incident Management System, risk assessment and mitigation, communications and technology systems, medical and public health emergencies and infrastructure protection.





3 credits

Note: This course is part of the Homeland Security core for the Master of Science degree in Homeland Security Management and is required for the Advanced Certificate in Homeland Security Management.

HSTI 520 - Constitutional Issues in Homeland Security Management

This course provides students with an overview of the various statutes, case law, and Constitutional issues governing the activities of practitioners involved in the Homeland Security enterprise at the federal, state and local levels. These issues and bodies of law are of critical importance to Homeland Security practitioners and policymakers, and the course considers their important social, ethical, and political implications. The central focus of the course is on the question of how to balance the goals, objectives and activities of effective Homeland Security against the compelling need to preserve and extend fundamental American civil liberties. The course examines the Constitutional and legal framework of the Homeland Security enterprise, discusses specific Constitutional issues and cases as they apply to Homeland Security, and considers the relationship between Homeland Security policies and the preservation of civil liberties. It examines the effectiveness of various court decisions and legislation including the USA PATRIOT Act in preventing and responding to the threat of terrorism as well as their role in shaping the development of Homeland Security agencies, policies, strategies, and infrastructure.





3 credits

Note: This course is part of the Homeland Security core for the Master of Science degree in Homeland Security Management and is required for the Advanced Certificate in Homeland Security Management.

HSTI 530 - Domestic and International Terrorism

This course provides an in-depth examination of the threat of terrorism and its impact on the Homeland Security enterprise by exploring the overall phenomena of terrorism as well as the complex motivations, ideologies, goals and tactics of various domestic and international terrorist groups. Cultural, religious and economic influences on terrorism will be considered. Students will analyze these groups in light of historical, contemporary and potential future acts of terrorism in order to refine their knowledge of terrorism prevention, detection, response and investigation. The course focuses upon such topical issues as state terrorism, political terrorism, revolutionary terrorism, religious and apocalyptic violence, weapons of mass destruction, and terrorist tactics and targeting, as well as the practical strategies and approaches of counterterrorism.





3 credits

Note: This course is part of the Homeland Security core for the Master of Science degree in Homeland Security Management and is required for the Advanced Certificate in Homeland Security Management.

HSTI 535 - Cyber Security: Issues, Policy, and Terrorism

This course explores the relationships and interactions between various private-sector institutions and public-sector Homeland Security organizations at the federal, state and local levels as they face cyber threats, particularly terrorism. The course examines the specific roles, responsibilities, and vulnerabilities of private- sector entities in protecting critical infrastructure as well as in preventing, deterring, mitigating, and responding to crises. Among the institutions and organizations considered are public utilities, the private security industry, mental health workers, hospitals and biomedical facilities, the public health sector, chemical and hazardous materials companies, shipping and transportation companies, airlines and airports, the financial services industry, and information technology and telecommunications companies. Particular emphasis is paid to mitigating and managing the threat of cyber terrorism.





3 credits

Note: This course is part of the Cyber Security Policy core for the Master of Science degree in Homeland Security Management and is required for the Advanced Certificate in Cyber Security Policy.

HSTI 540 - The Intelligence Function in Homeland Security Management

This course acquaints students with the concepts and practices involved in the process of collecting, analyzing and evaluating intelligence and in managing the intelligence function, as well as the influence of intelligence in shaping homeland security decision-making at the federal, state and local levels. It examines the structures, roles, and interactions of the foreign and domestic intelligence communities, the intelligence gathering and analysis capabilities of criminal justice and private sector entities, and the use of intelligence processes to support homeland security investigations, planning, and policy formulation. Based in a case study approach, students in this course will develop an understanding of intelligence tradecraft and the analytic and research skills used in intelligence work, as well as an appreciation for the ethical, Constitutional, and civil liberties issues involved. Specific topics considered include open source intelligence, assessing the reliability and validity of information, intelligence sharing, covert and counterintelligence operations, Homeland Security managers as both producers and consumers of intelligence, and the future of homeland security intelligence.





3 credits

Note: This course is part of the Homeland Security core for the Master of Science degree in Homeland Security Management and is required for the Advanced Certificate in Homeland Security Management.

HSTI 545 - Advanced Cyber Security Policy and Intelligence

This course continues the exploration of the relationships and interactions between various private-sector institutions and public-sector Homeland Security organizations at the federal, state and local levels with a focus on intelligence issues. The course broadens the examination of the specific roles, responsibilities, and vulnerabilities of private- sector entities in protecting critical infrastructure as well as in preventing, deterring, mitigating, and responding to crises. Among the institutions and organizations considered are public utilities, the private security industry, mental health workers, hospitals and biomedical facilities, the public health sector, chemical and hazardous materials companies, shipping and transportation companies, airlines and airports, the financial services industry, and information technology and telecommunications companies. The debate on the numerous cyber security related issues and how intelligence plays in each will define the first quarter of the 21st Century. At the end of this course the students will be able to capably and constructively participate in that debate with a greatly enhanced understanding of the types of intelligence needed in regard to cyber issues.



3 credits

Note: This course is part of the Cyber Security Policy core for the Master of Science degree in Homeland Security Management and is required for the Advanced Certificate in Cyber Security Policy.

HSTI 550 - Homeland Security and the Private Sector

This course explores the relationships and interactions between various private-sector institutions and public-sector Homeland Security organizations at the federal, state and local levels. It examines the specific roles, responsibilities, and vulnerabilities of private-sector entities in protecting critical infrastructure as well as in preventing, deterring, and responding to crises. Among the institutions and organizations considered are public utilities, the private security industry, mental health workers, hospitals and biomedical facilities, the public health sector, chemical and hazardous materials companies, shipping and transportation companies, airlines and airports, the financial services industry, and information technology and telecommunications companies. Particular emphasis is paid to mitigating and managing the threat of nuclear, biological, chemical and radiological (NBCR) weapons.





3 credits

Note: This course is part of the Homeland Security core for the Master of Science degree in Homeland Security Management and required for the Advanced Certificate in Homeland Security Management. Students enrolled in the Homeland Security core may alternatively opt to enroll in HSTI 555 to satisfy the HSTI 550 requirement.

HSTI 555 - Advanced Cyber Security – Technology Issues for Policy Makers

This course continues the exploration of Cyber Security issues beyond the relationships and interactions between various private-sector institutions and public-sector Homeland Security organizations at the federal, state and local levels. It adds the cutting edge technical issues about which today's policy makers must be fluent if they are to successfully tackle the cyber security issue set. The course broadens the examination of the specific roles, responsibilities, and vulnerabilities of private- sector entities in protecting critical infrastructure as well as in preventing, deterring, mitigating, and responding to crises. Among the institutions and organizations considered are public utilities, the private security industry, mental health workers, hospitals and biomedical facilities, the public health sector, chemical and hazardous materials companies, shipping and transportation companies, airlines and airports, the financial services industry, and information technology and telecommunications companies. A clear understanding of the numerous cyber security technical issues discussed here will properly equip the students to understand the technical issues that will define the first quarter of the 21st Century. At the end of this course the students will be able to capably and constructively address how these technical issues will affect our Nation's Homeland security.

3 credits

Note: This course is part of the Cyber Security Policy core for the Master of Science degree in Homeland Security Management and required for the Advanced Certificate in Cyber Security Policy. Students enrolled in the Advanced Certificate in Homeland Security Management may opt to enroll in this course to satisfy the HSTI 550 requirement.

HSTI 600 – Emergency Management

This course examines historical and contemporary theories, principles, and practices of Emergency Management, particularly the all-hazards approach and the related processes of mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. Using a case study approach, the course considers the evolution of Emergency Management and its practical application within government and private-sector institutions. The roles, responsibilities, and duties of Emergency Managers at various levels of government are discussed, as are the relationships between the agencies, organizations, and individuals involved. The course acquaints students with the National Response Plan and such contemporary Emergency Management systems as the National Incident Management System (NIMS), with specific attention paid to their applicability to crises that include terrorist events, natural and man-made disasters, and other hazards.





3 credits

Note: This is a required course for the Master of Science.

HSTI 610 – Psychological and Sociological Aspects of Disaster and Terrorism

This course examines the traumatic psychological consequences of terrorism and disasters upon individuals and groups, as well as the individual and collective social behaviors that typically become manifest after these events. The course examines a range of psychological and social issues related to terrorism and disaster, including theories of psychological trauma, trauma prevention strategies and crisis intervention, the impact of psychological trauma upon first responders and those directly exposed to terrorism or disasters, the psychological goals of terrorism, and post traumatic stress.





3 credits

Note : This is a required course for the Master of Science.

HSTI 620 – Research Design and Methods in Homeland Security Management

This course surveys the various quantitative and qualitative analytic methods and research designs used for policy development and evaluation in Homeland Security fields, as well as the critical thinking skills and practical techniques involved in preparing analytical research products and reports. The course takes an interdisciplinary approach to research, and students become acquainted with such research methods as case studies, field research, surveys, content analysis, experimental designs, secondary analysis, and other forms of evaluative research. Various methods of statistical analysis are also covered, preparing students to design and conduct an original thesis research project.





3 credits

Note: This is a required course for the Master of Science.

HSTI 630 – Practicum: Graduate Internship in Homeland Security

Under the supervision and direction of a member of the Homeland Security and Terrorism Institute’s faculty selected by the Program Director, students participate in a planned program of observation and participation in the management operations of a homeland security agency.



3 credits

Note: To ensure that all graduates achieve an appropriate level of practical experience and professional competence in the homeland security field, students must complete a practicum requirement by taking either HSTI 630 - Practicum: Graduate Internship in Homeland Security or HSTI 640 - Practicum: Exercises in Homeland Security. It is up to the student to find a suitable agency to host their internship, and have that agency contact the Homeland Security and Terrorism Institute for further instructions. All students anticipating registration for this course must contact the Homeland Security and Terrorism Institute’s Graduate Advisor prior to registration.

Students employed in a homeland security field may, upon application to the Program Director and demonstrated competency in the practical aspects of homeland security management, receive a waiver to substitute an appropriate elective course for the practicum requirement. All students requesting a waiver from the practicum must contact the Homeland Security and Terrorism Institute’s Graduate Advisor.

HSTI 640 – Practicum: Exercises in Homeland Security

Under the supervision and direction of a member of the Homeland Security and Terrorism Institute’s faculty selected by the Program Director, students undertake a project involving substantive participation in managing a major simulation, exercise, or drill involving multiple agencies or institutions. Student involvement will include planning, designing, developing, conducting and evaluating the simulation or drill.



3 credits

Note: All students anticipating registration for this course must contact the Homeland Security and Terrorism Institute’s Graduate Advisor prior to registration.

HSTI 760 – Capstone Project

With the guidance and supervision of a mentor designated by the Program Director, the student will carry out the independent capstone project. The capstone project will demonstrate the student's mastery of a substantive issue in the homeland security management field. The capstone project will demonstrate the student's understanding of the academic and/or policy research process, display his or her capacity to identify, assess, and review relevant literature and other sources of information, confirm his or her ability to formulate cogent research questions, and validate his or her ability to select and use appropriate research methods to explore those research questions.

3 credits 

Note: HSTI 760 must be taken in the student's final semester. All students anticipating registration for this course must contact the Homeland Security and Terrorism Institute’s Graduate Enrollment Services Counselor prior to registration. An INC grade in HSTI 760 must be removed within 18 months.























































Academic Advising

Current and prospective students are encouraged to review our courses and degree requirements detailed in both our Master of Science and Advanced Certificate web pages. If you require additional advisement and/or registration assistance, please contact the Academic Advisor Laura Toja with any and all programmatic and advising related concerns at 516-299-2986 or laura.toja@liu.edu.  For all Blackboard and other technical support issues, please contact Mr. Dev Mondal at devabrata.mondal@liu.edu.

CONTACT

LIU Riverhead
Abagail Van Vlerah
Abby.VanVlerah@liu.edu