Health Sciences

B.S. in Health Sciences


Health care is an ever-expanding field with many rewarding career paths. The federal government expects health care to dominate job growth, with 5.6 million new jobs expected by 2020. The 120-credit B.S. in Health Sciences is a science-based major designed for freshman and transfer students who aspire to careers in a variety of health-related fields, including physical therapy, occupational therapy, athletic training, pharmacy, physician assistant, medical imaging or health information management. Even if you haven't yet decided on a career path within the health professions field, this versatile degree can uniquely qualify you for admittance to graduate or medical school, or lead to a job upon graduation.

Assured Seats
LIU Post offers a limited number of assured seats at LIU Brooklyn in our physical and occupational therapy, pharmacy, athletic training and physician assistant programs for the most qualified Health Sciences students.

This program provides an excellent foundation in the liberal arts, with a strong focus on the sciences. As part of the health sciences curriculum, students select one of ten minors—Business Administration, Accountancy, Health Care Administration, Public Service, Social Work, Society and Health, Sports Management, Nutrition, Healthcare Reimbursement & Coding, and Spanish Language for Healthcare Professionals  —that will broaden your understanding of the delivery of health care. The B.S. in Health Sciences also provides graduates with marketable skills in the business and public policy of health care. Full-time academic counselors with expertise in health care education will assist students in planning their course of study.

View Health Sciences Major and Minor Courses


Program Requirements

Course # Course Name Credits

REQUIRED BS IN HEALTH SCIENCE COURSES
(ALL OF THE FOLLOWING)

BIO 7 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4
BIO 8 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4
BIO 103 General Biology I 4
BIO 104 General Biology II 4
BMS 90 Microbiology in Health Sciences 4
BMS 211 Pathophysiology I 3
BMS 212 Pathophysiology II 3
CHM 3 Principles of Chemistry I 4
CHM 4 Principles of Chemistry II 4
HSC 101 Introduction to Health Professions 3
HSC 102 Interdisciplinary Helping Professions 3
NTR 10 Nutrition 3
PSY 101 General Psychology 3

REQUIRED COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSE
(ONE OF THE FOLLOWING)

BMS 40 Computer Applications in Health Science 3
CLA 6 Computer Literacy 3
HPA 20 Computer-Based Management Systems (required in Healthcare Admin sub-plan) 3

REQUIRED MATHEMATICS COURSE
(ONE OF THE FOLLOWING)

MTH 3 College Algebra and Trigonometry 4
MTH 7 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4

REQUIRED COURSE
(ONE OF THE FOLLOWING)

ORC 1 Public Speaking 3
ORC 17 Speech Communication in Organizations 3
SPE 5 Voice and Diction 3

REQUIRED STATISTICS COURSE
(ONE OF THE FOLLOWING)

ECO 72 Statistics 3
HIM 54 Statistics and Research for Health Information Manager 3
MTH 19 Basic Statistics 3
MTH 41 Biostatistics 3

Selection of one of the following subplans:

  1. Accountancy (18 credits)
  2. Business (21 credits)
  3. Health Administration (18 credits)
  4. Health and Society (18 credits)
  5. Nutrition (18 credits)
  6. Public Service (18 credits)
  7. Social Work (18 credits)
  8. Spanish for Health Professions (18 credits)
  9. Sports Management (18 credits)

Course # Course Name Credits
Required Core Courses 
POST 101 Post Foundations 1
FY First-Year Seminar 3
ENG 1** Writing 1 3
ENG 2** Writing 2 3
MTH 5 Quantitative Reasoning 3-4 
Choose one course from each of the five below course clusters and one additional course from one of the clusters.
Scientific Inquiry & the Natural World
4
Creativity Media & the Arts 3
Perspectives on World Culture 3
Self, Society & Ethics 3
Power, Institutions & Structures (ECO 10 Required) 3
One additional course from one of the five above clusters. (ECO 11 Required) 3
General Elective (3 Credits from Any Course)
* Some courses may count as core and others as electives. ** In addition to ENG 1 and 2, students take at least 3 more writing intensive (WAC) courses as part of their major, core, or elective courses.  ENG 303 and 304 can satisfy the ENG 1 and 2 requirement for students in the Honors College.
Credit Requirements
Total Major Requirement Credits 59
Required Subplan Credits 18-21
Total General Education Credits 40-43
Total Degree Credits 120

Courses

BIO 7 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
This course covers the structure and function of the human body, including basic biochemistry, cell structure, cell division, cell respiration, tissue composition, genetics, and the nervous and endocrine systems. Laboratory focuses on relevant physiological experiments and histology.Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. This course fulfills the Scientific Inquiry and the Natural World thematic cluster requirement in the core curriculum.
Credits: 4
Every Fall and Summer

BIO 8 Human Anatomy and Physiology II
This course covers the body's organ systems in detail, including the musculo-skeletal, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, excretory, digestive, and reproductive systems. Relevant dissection, histological studies, and physiology are all featured in the laboratories. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. This course fulfills the Scientific Inquiry and the Natural World thematic cluster requirement in the core curriculum.
Pre-requisite BIO 7 is required.
Credits: 4
Every Spring and Summer

BIO 103 General Biology I
Processes fundamental to all living things such as energy utilization, growth, development, and reproduction will be examined from the perspective of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. The goal will be a comprehension of the functioning of the living organism as embedded in the integration of these fundamental biological mechanisms. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. This course fulfills the Scientific Inquiry and the Natural World thematic cluster requirement in the core curriculum.
Credits: 4
Every Fall and Spring

BIO 104 General Biology II
This course introduces patterns and processes of organisms and groups of organisms with emphasis on their origin, evolution, and the relationships among them and their environments. Topics include evolution, population genetics, systematics, animal behavior and ecology. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. This course fulfills the Scientific Inquiry and the Natural World thematic cluster requirement in the core curriculum.
Pre-requisite BIO 103 is required. Pre-requisite of not having taken BIO 1S or BIO 4 is required. Credits: 4
Every Fall and Spring

BMS 90 Microbiology in Health Sciences
This course is required for all medical biology majors and health related majors including those students seeking graduate study in the biological sciences and those seeking admission into professional schools. The course introduces the principles of clinical microbiology and characteristics of microorganisms, host-parasite relationships, resistance, immunity, hypersensitivity, public health, epidemiology as well as applied, medical and industrial microbiology; includes clinical diagnostic methods such as culture, control, identification, sterilization, microbiological techniques and concepts; emphasizes those techniques specifically employed in the clinical microbiological laboratory. 
Credits: 4
Fall and Spring

BMS 211 Pathophysiology I
The change in the human body that may be biological, physical, chemical or anatomical which induce disease or an abnormal process are discussed. The etiology and pathogenesis of altered body systems is emphasized. How change can significantly reduce normal function of the body systems is also identified. Writing Across the Curriculum course.
Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring

BMS 212 Pathophysiology II
At the end of the course, the student should have a comprehensive knowledge regarding various inflammatory, neoplastic, congenital and acquired disease states affecting various organ systems of human body and to answer questions related to the pathophysiology, diagnosis and prognosis of the disease entities.
Prerequisite of BMS 211 (previously BMS 20) is required.
Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring

CHM 3 Principles of Chemistry I
This course is the first part of two-semester sequence that includes the study of the nature of matter and energy, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, thermochemistry, atomic structure and chemical bonding.
To enroll in CHM 3, students must either have placed into MTH 7 or have received a grade of C or better in MTH 3 or its equivalent. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. This course fulfills the Scientific Inquiry and the Natural World thematic cluster requirement in the core curriculum.
Prerequisite of MTH 3 or 3S with a grade of C or above or Co-requisite of MTH 7 or MTH 8 is
required. Not open to students who have taken CHM 4, 21, 22, 25, 37 or 71.
Credits: 4
Every Fall, Spring and Summer

CHM 4 Principles of Chemistry II
This course is the second part of a two-semester sequence that includes the study of colligative properties, kinetics, chemical equilibria, acid-base chemistry, chemical thermodynamics, and electrochemistry.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.
Prerequisite of CHM 3 is required. Not open to students who have taken CHM 21, 22, 25, 37 or 71.
Credits: 4
Every Fall, Spring and Summer

HSC 101 Introduction to Health Professions
This course will provide an introduction to various professions in the health care field. Students will be exposed to an overview of health care systems and major aspects of health care delivery. Students will understand health care priorities on the national and local level. Various health careers will be reviewed with a goal to understand underlying qualities and characteristics of health professions and professional behavior, related values, interests and ethics. In addition, students can begin to explore health career options based on an understanding of professional tasks, skills, tools and technology, abilities, work activities, work context/environment and educational, training and legal requirements. In addition, the course will provide an introduction to medical terminology, as well as library skills. Students will also be required to create a professional resume that may be used for future opportunities.
Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring

HSC 102 Interdisciplinary Helping Professions
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to relationship building as the key to effective helping across the health and social service professions. The model of relationship-centered care (RCC) and the narrative medicine approach will provide the conceptual and methodological frameworks for interdisciplinary collaborative care delivery by professions such as social work, physician assistants, physical therapy, medicine and all related healthcare professions. The course is focused on four domains critical to successful health care: the practitioner/patient
(client) relationship, the practitioner/practitioner (interdisciplinary team) relationship, the practitioner-community (community of care) relationship and the practitioner-self relationship. It emphasizes the need to attune to and act on the narratives of suffering and strengths of those who seek care as well as all others involved in caregiving, including the clinician, for effective practice of healthcare. Students engage in dyadic and small group exercises designed to develop effect practice skills.
Required course for BS Health Science majors, elective for Social Work Majors (Open to Juniors or Seniors, 3 credits)
Open to Juniors or Seniors.
Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring

NTR 10 Nutrition
In this course, students learn about the role of nutrition in improving health and applying these ideas to developing healthy eating patterns. They will understand how food choices and physical activity contribute to total well-being. Open to Non-Majors only.
Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring

PSY 101 General Psychology
This course is a survey of principles, concepts, and ideas from psychology. Topics will include research in psychology; biological bases of behavior; sensation and perception; learning; developmental psychology; social psychology. Not open to students who have taken PSY102. This course fulfills the Ethics, Self, and Society thematic cluster requirement in the core curriculum.
Not open to students who have taken PSY 102. Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring

CONTACT

School of Health Professions and Nursing
Dr. Denise Walsh, Dean
Life Science, Room 154
post-shpn@liu.edu