Communication Sciences and Disorders

B.S. in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology


The 120-credit Bachelor of Science in Speech Language Pathology and Audiology will prepare you for a career helping people of all ages overcome communication disorders—from young children who stutter to stroke victims struggling to speak again.

Along with a comprehensive liberal arts education, the curriculum offers coursework in normal and disordered communication. Students observe adults and children with speech and/or language disorders in community-based settings. A limited field-based experience may also be available to qualified students. Graduates of this program are ready to advance to master’s-level study and work toward a Certificate of Clinical Competence from the American Speech-Language-Hearing-Association, as well as New York State licensure and certification as a Teacher of Students with Speech and Language Disabilities (TSSLD).

As a candidate for the B.S. in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, you will fulfill coursework in the liberal arts core, education classes, English, as well as courses in the Speech Language Pathology major in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders.



Program Requirements

Course # Course Name Credits

REQUIRED SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY COURSES
(ALL OF THE FOLLOWING)

SPE 5 Voice and Diction 3
SPE 35J Methods and Materials for Speech Therapy 3
SPE 35 Application for Speech Therapy 3
SPE 51 Phonetics of English 3
SPE 63 Introduction to Linguistics and Language Acquisition 3
SPE 65 Introduction to Diagnostic Procedures 3
SPE 67 Introduction to Language Disorders in Children 3
SPE 70 Professional and Scientific Writing 3
SPE 82 Introduction to Speech Science 3
SPE 84 Anatomy & Physiology of Speech and Hearing Mechanisms 3
SPE 85 Introduction to Articulation Disorders 3
SPE 88 Introduction to Neuroanatomy 3
SPE 90 Introduction to Audiology 3
SPE 91 Introduction to Aural Rehabilitation 3
SPE 93 Speech Pathology I 3
SPE 94 Speech Pathology II 3
SPE 95 Introduction to Clinical Research 3
SPE Elective SPE 86, SPE 98, ENG 3, or ENG 202 (Not required for Transfer Students with 60 credits) 3

CO-RELATED COURSES

EDI 14 Foundations of Education 3
EDI 41A Nurturing Yound Children’s Development: A Multicultural Approach 3
PHY 11 College Physics I 4
MTH 19 Basic Statistics 3

Course # Course Name Credits
POST 101 Post Foundations 1
FY First-Year Seminar 3
ENG 1* Writing 1 3
ENG 2* Writing 2 3
MTH Quantitative Reasoning: fulfilled with any MTH course
(MTH 7 required for major)
3-4
Choose one course from each of the five below course clusters and one additional course from one of the clusters.
Scientific Inquiry & the Natural World
(BIO 103 required for major)
4
Creativity Media & the Arts 3
Perspectives on World Culture 3
Self, Society & Ethics 3
Power, Institutions & Structures 3
One additional course from one of the five above clusters. (BIO 104 required for major) 3-4

* In addition to ENG 1 and 2, students take at least 3 more writing intensive (WAC) courses as part of their major, core, or elective courses.

ENG 303 and 304 can satisfy the ENG 1 and 2 requirement for students in the Honors College.

Credit Requirements
Total Major Requirement Credits 54
Elective Major Credits 13
Total Core Requirement Credits 32
Elective Liberal Arts & Sciences Credits 21
Total Degree Credits 120

Course Descriptions

SPE 5 Voice and Diction
Communication is part of every aspect of our lives.  In this course, students will explore the nature of a wide variety of communication forms and will acquire the skills to 1) formulate more effective verbal and non-verbal messages, 2) communicate more effectively in interpersonal relationships, 3) listen actively, and 4) manage interpersonal conflict.  Students will also, learn to communicate more effectively during interviews and to construct and deliver effective public speeches. 
Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring

SPE 35 Methods and Materials: Applications for Speech-Language Therapy
This course introduces the student to basic methods and materials of intervention for individuals with communication disorders. Materials used in speech-language therapy ae presented using a hands-on-approach.  The decision making process involved in the development of appropriate long term goals and objectives will be explored as will the steps involved in lesson planning.
Prerequisites: SPE 35J and SPE 67 
Credits: 3
Every Spring

SPE 35J Methods and Materials for Speech-Language Therapy
This writing intensive course focuses on the basic considerations for speech-language therapy including the therapeutic process, basic principles of learning, the development of treatment plans and administration of treatment sessions.  Students will learn to observe behavior, to target behaviors being learned or modified, to perform task analysis and to assess the effectiveness of procedures one implemented.  Students will become conversant in the application of a model associated with evidence based practice.

Prerequisite: SPE 93 

WAC CLASS requirement. 
Credits:3
Every Spring

SPE 51 Phonetics of English
This course is an introduction to phonetic and phonetic structure of American English: sound formulation and dialectic differences.  Related acoustic, anatomical and physiological and linguistic factors are considered along with broad and narrow transcription using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)
Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring

SPE 63 Introduction to Linguistics and Language Acquisition
The normal process and stages of language acquisition in children from birth to adolescence are described in this course.  The relationship between children’s language and children’s perceptual, cognitive and social development are explained within a cultural context.
Credits: 3
Every Fall

SPE 65 Introduction to Diagnostic Procedures
Diagnostic methods in speech and language pathology are covered in this course.  The interview, the case history, the oral facial, and clinical examination are presented.  Students become familiar with standardized and non-standardized tests.  The importance of reliability and validity of testing is stressed.  Fundamentals of professional report writing are also introduced.
Prerequisites: SPE 63, 67, 85,and 93 
Credits: 3
Every Spring

SPE 67 Introduction to Language Disorders in Children
This course assists the student in identifying disorders or delays in language development.  Semantic, syntactic, pragmatic and phonological aspects of language are discussed. Assessment procedures and therapeutic methods are included in the discussions. 
Prerequisites: 51,63,84, and 93 
Credits: 3
Every Fall 

SPE 70 Professional and Scientific Writing in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
This course offers an introduction to syntactic analysis and professional and scientific writing.  It is also specifically tailored to undergraduate students majoring in speech-language pathology and audiology. This course is designed to provide students with the foundations of grammatical analysis necessary to assess language disorders and the tools to become proficient at writing professional goals and objectives, clinical and scientific reports.  The class will familiarize students with the analytical processes involved in syntax analysis and in proofreading clinical and scientific reports.  
Prerequisite: SPE 63 
Credits: 3
Every Spring

SPE 82 Introduction to Speech Science
This course is a study of acoustic events and processes involved in speech and language.  Information on speech transmission and perception is provided.
Prerequisites: SPE 51, SPE 84,and PHY 11
Credits: 3
Every Spring  

SPE 84 Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism
This course is a comprehensive review of the anatomical and physiological aspects of speech, language, hearing and swallowing.  These include the respiratory, laryngeal, articulatory and auditory systems.
Credits: 3
Every Fall

SPE 85 Introduction to Articulation and Phonological Disorders
This course focuses on the nature and treatment of articulation and phonological disorders in children.  Course content includes a review of articulatory phonetics and the rule-governed system(s) underlying phonological development.  Typical articulatory and phonological development is contrasted with disordered development.  Evaluative and treatment procedures are presented.
Prerequisites: SPE 51,63, and 84 
Credits: 3
Every Spring

SPE 86 Clinical Practicum in Speech Language Pathology (Elective)
A limited introductory clinical practicum in a private or public school setting is provided.  There is experience in clinical assessment and intervention with preschoolers or school-aged children manifesting communication disorders.  Student must have a GPA of 3.0 to enroll. Requires major GPA 3.4 and departmental approval.  
Prerequisites: SPE 35J and SPE 35

Credits: 2
Every Fall and Spring

SPE 88 Introduction to Neuroanatomy for the Speech-Language Pathologist
This required course provides working knowledge of anatomical landmarks of the central nervous system and its physiology.  Focus is particularly on the neurological underpinnings of speech and language.
Prerequisite: SPE 84 
Credits: 3

Every Spring

SPE 90 Introduction to Audiology
This course presents the anatomy and physiology of the hearing mechanism.  It includes an introduction to the presentation of audiometric tests, discussion and interpretation of test results and a study of elementary hearing problems.
Prerequisites: SPE 84, SPE 93
Credits: 3
Every Fall

SPE 91 Introduction to Aural Rehabilitation
This course is an introduction of hearing aid technology, auditory training and visual speech-reading training in the communicative rehabilitation of the hearing impaired.  Hearing conservation and patient counseling procedures are discussed.
Prerequisites SPE 90,SPE 93
Credits: 3
Every Spring

SPE 93 Speech Pathology I: Introduction to Pediatric Communication Disorders
The student will be provided with information basic to the understanding of childhood    speech and language disorders.  Both differences and delays, as compared to normal language development will be discussed. Assessment and intervention will be covered as they relate to each disorder.  
Prerequisites: of SPE 51,63 & 84
Credits: 3
Every Spring

SPE 94 Speech Pathology II: Introduction to Adult Speech and Language Disorders
This course will provide each student with basic knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for speech and language in the adult. It will also address the underlying causes of disease processes that compromise the “normal” production of speech and language.  The disorders of aphasia, right hemisphere brain damage, traumatic brain injury, senile dementia, dysarthria, apraxia, dysphagia and alaryngeal speech will be discussed, as well as principles of assessment and intervention.
Prerequisites: SPE 51,84, and 88 
Credits: 3
Every Fall

SPE 95 Introduction to Clinical Research in Communication Disorders
The fundamental goal of this course is to provide students with the ability to evaluate the research literature in speech-language pathology, audiology, and speech science.  Students will be introduced to the aims and methods of descriptive and experimental research, including inductive/scientific procedure, types and techniques of measurement, data analysis and presentation, verification of validity and reliability and the form of research reports.  This course will provide the basic information necessary to develop research skills and perform critical analysis of professional literature in communication disorders.

Prerequisites: SPE67, SPE93 and MTH 19

WAC CLASS requirement
Credits: 3
Every Fall 

SPE 97 American Sign Language 2
This course builds on the foundation laid in SPE 98 by expanding the students' conversational range using American Sign Language. In addition, idiomatic expressions will be covered. 

Prerequisites: SPE 98
 
Credits: 3
On Occasion 

SPE 98 American Sign Language I (Elective) 
This course equips students to communicate with deaf, hard of hearing and seriously language-impaired (non-oral) individuals through basic-level fingerspelling, facial expressions and American Sign Language system.
Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring

SPE 99 Independent Study
Permission to take this course is based on particular criteria: 1) merit of proposed study; 2) cumulative or major average; 3) maturity of student; i.e. ability to complete such a study. Permission to take this independent course necessitate the signature of the faculty member conducting the study and the department chair. The faculty member directing the project must be qualified in the area designated by the student.  The choice of faculty member (with the previous stipulation) is made by the student.
Credits: 1 to 3
On Occasion

SPE 385 Honors Tutorial (Elective) 
This course is offered when students in the honors program seek to pursue an honor’s thesis in the field of speech, language or hearing disorders. The student must identify a specific area of study and secure a mentor within the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders with expertise in the area specified.  A formal request must be presented and signed by the faculty mentor and the chairperson as specified by the Honor’s Program.
Must be in Honors College
Credits: 3
On Occasion

SPE 386 Honors Tutorial (Elective) 
This course is a continuation of SPE 385, offered when students in the Honors Program seek to pursue an honor’s thesis in the field of speech, language or hearing disorders. The student pursues a pre-approved topic with a mentor within the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders with expertise in the area specified.
Must be in Honors College
Credits: 3
On Occasion

SPE 389 Honors Thesis
This course is offered to students who have successfully completed an honor’s tutorial with a faculty mentor in the area of communication sciences and disorders.  The student must identify a thesis advisor and a reader.  A formal written description of the thesis must be submitted and signed by the advisor, reader and department chairperson in accordance with Honor’s Program policies.
Must be in Honors College
Credits: 3
On Occasion

SPE 390 Honors Thesis
This course is a continuation of SPE 389, offered to students who have successfully completed an honor’s tutorial with a faculty mentor in the area of communication sciences and disorders. The student must identify a thesis advisor and a reader.  A formal written description of the thesis must be submitted and signed by the advisor, reader and department chairperson in accordance with Honor’s Program policies.
Must be in Honors College
Credits: 3 On Occasion


Mission & Vision Statement

Communication Sciences and Disorders Departmental Vision Statement

The vision of our Master of Arts (MA) program in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) at LIU Post is to enhance interprofessional programs that incorporate training of its students in a variety of disciplines, to focus on a team concept that requires active engagement with other clinically and educationally oriented disciplines across the University, in both the School of Health Professions and Nursing (SHPN), and the College of Education, Information and Technology (CEIT). Our students in CSD will participate in increased learning, interactive and /or clinical activities with students from different departments in varied clinical and/or educational experiences.

Our students learn to address the myriad of communicative, cognitive, learning, physiological, emotional and behavioral needs of infants, children, adults and older adults in various settings throughout the lifespan. For example, in medically-based settings, our students in CSD interact with those training in nursing, nutrition, medical imaging, occupational and physical therapy to form coherent, cohesive rehabilitation units that address both acute and chronic medical issues in pediatric and adult patient populations. Further, in school-based settings, our students engage in meaningful team interactions with representation from the disciplines of counseling, literacy, elementary and secondary education, special education and health services, to address the learning goals of students.

The CSD department will continue to incorporate the latest teaching strategies, simulation experiences, clinical opportunities and technologies available in both medical, educational, and other settings to accomplish their vision of program development.

Communication Sciences and Disorders Departmental Mission Statement

The MA program in CSD is designed to mentor and educate students to become competent, caring, qualified and accountable speech-language pathologists who in turn will be well equipped to serve individuals through the life span, in a culturally and linguistically diverse society. Our mission is to provide students with a comprehensive program, built upon a sound theoretical foundation in speech, language and hearing sciences, in which clinical skill development is integrated. Academic and clinical experiences will be guided by a strong adherence to evidence based practice. Training emphasizes the development of critical thinking, decision-making, and communication skills applied to clinical situations in closely supervised environments with both real and simulated clients. Students are required to demonstrate high standards of competency and legal/ethical conduct within the scope of professional practice. One element in our training of MA candidates includes interprofessional educational opportunities where students can learn from and work closely with members of other disciplines. We seek to guide our students through the program by providing advisement, instruction, as well as clinical and intellectual challenges. Our program goals are both formative and summative in accordance with the standards of our professional accrediting organization, the Counsel of Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, of the American Speech, Language, and Hearing Association. Upon completion of the program, our students are prepared to function in our pluralistic society as speech-language pathologists working alongside allied health professionals and educators in a variety of settings serving the needs of infants, children, adults, and older adults throughout the lifespan.

Philosophically our mission is congruent with LIU Post, the School of Health Profession and Nursing and College of Education, Information and Technology, in the belief that education must be comprehensive and expansive providing both depth and breadth of knowledge. This notion relates especially well to the development of an expertise in normal and disordered communication through the life span and across the diversity within our society. The program's mission also relates to that of the University in that we foster dialogue with our students on many levels: through academic counseling, classroom instruction, clinical education and class evaluations.

Strategic Plan 2020-2023

Focus on the Preparation of the Speech-Language Pathologist

Focus 1: Focus on Interprofessional Education and Practice

Envisioned Future:

In accordance with our program mission and the mission of the University, our graduates will be able to demonstrate an appreciation of the collaboration that exists between different academic and clinical training programs as they prepare for their own certification and licensure in speech-language pathology. Depending on the job setting that they enter following graduation, there will be numerous opportunities that encourage collaboration between colleagues from different educational and clinical disciplines, including but not limited to: regular and special education, literacy, nursing, nutrition, counseling and social work, psychology, medical imaging, physical therapy and occupational therapy.

ASHA’s envisioned future statement (2025) states “An Interprofessional Education (IPE) approach to training and educating new professionals has resulted in access to a broader supply of qualified faculty to meet the teaching, scholarly research, and technological needs of academic programs as they strive to enhance the scientific base of the discipline and educate qualified speech-language pathologists and audiologists to meet consumer needs.”

Issues:

Effective remediation of speech-language, swallowing, voice, cognitive and/or communication skills in the context of real-life settings that incorporate all aspects of an individual's growth and development across domains is essential to the success of a speech-language pathologist as interprofessional team member. Students will:

  • Demonstrate the ability to effectively learn all aspects of a client's strengths and deficits to better inform them of how to deal with co-existing medical, physical, emotional, nutritional, psychological and/or educational problems often exhibited by these individuals
    • Support interprofessional learning by providing information on a client's speech, language, hearing and/or swallowing abilities to colleagues of different disciplines, to create a well-rounded understanding of the client as a whole entity and not subject to piecemeal investigation and care
  • Maintain effective communication and collaboration with all interprofessional partners in both educational and clinical quarters in order to ensure the highest quality of care for individuals across the lifespan
  • Exhibit sufficient reading and writing skills to meet curriculum and clinical standards in an interprofessional educational model
    • Provide referrals to clients/patients, families, caregivers, and significant others pertaining to areas of need that lie outside the domains of speech-language, hearing and dysphagia

Outcomes :

The program will increase the number of interprofessional events, programs, and opportunities.

The program will provide students with numerous exposures to interprofessional collaboration in the classroom and clinical/professional settings, e.g.:

  1. Engagement in SIM laboratory (nursing, nutrition, medical imaging departments)
    1. Collaborating with psychology doctoral students in aphasia center (psychology department)
    2. Hosting lectures on counseling to acquire counseling techniques (counseling department)
      1. Case presentations conducted interdepartmentally to benefit the wider student body within and outside the CSD department
      2. Interprofessional presentations at state and national conventions
        1. Collaborating with undergraduate and masters level social work students with people with aphasia and other communication disorders.

Indicators of Success:

  • Observations and performance in the classroom and in clinical settings
  • Collaborative feedback from interprofessional faculty following interprofessional events
  • Embedding of interprofessional education approaches into graduate level courses as indicated by course syllabus

Strategies to Achieve Outcome:

Over the next three years continuing through 2023, the CSD department will increase interprofessional models and opportunities through out the graduate experience both in and out of the classroom.  The CSD will increase interprofessional relationships with other departments in the University and the community to foster this model.

Specific Strategies:

  • Interprofessional education models will be embedded into courses as it pertains to each subject matter
  • Increase communication with other departments within the School of Health Professions and Nursing (SHPN), and the College of Education, Information and Technology (CEIT}
  • Increase participation in learning, interactive and /or clinical activities with students from different departments in varied clinical and/or educational experiences
  • Invite guest faculty from other departments to provide instruction in relevant interprofessional areas and promote use of CSD faculty to provide training to other programs
  • Initiate an interdepartmental course/workshop co-taught by faculty from the CSD department and other departments to facilitate understanding of interprofessional collaboration
  • Increase guest lecturers from the community to our program to further facilitate learning of roles of other disciplines as it relates to the field of speech-language pathology
  • Engage in effective questioning to activate the students' interprofessional knowledge and facilitate the appropriate evaluation of situations
  • Provide feedback including objective data, narratives or written descriptions of specific behaviors that may lead to formulating proper referral recommendations to allied professionals
  • Establish interprofessional collaborative learning through simulation and case studies/presentations and interprofessional readings, tutorials and online modules

Focus 2: Focus on Evidence-Based Practice

Envisioned Future:

In accord with our program mission and the mission of the University, our graduates will be able to demonstrate application of professional research through the integration of their knowledge of research findings evidenced in their writings, their clinical evaluations and treatment planning for individuals presenting with a variety of communication and swallowing issues across diverse ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds.

Issues:

We live in a fast-paced world where on-going advances in the fields of medicine and technology impact the expectations we have in the evaluation and treatment of communication disorders. It is important to instill a thirst for life-long learning in our students through the pursuit of open-minded inquiry, examination of theoretical constructs and substantiation of the efficacy of clinical procedures. Consequently, we have designed an integrative framework of professional training with definitive learning objectives and outcome measures. Students in the program will:

  • Provide evidenced based rationales for treatment and assessments
  • Write research papers as part of the graduate program requirement
  • Develop professional presentations for submission for publication and/or presentation at local and national conventions, consistent with students’ past accomplishments.             

Outcomes:

The program will continue to provide students with numerous opportunities to demonstrate communicative effectiveness through evidenced based practice in the classroom and clinical/professional settings, e.g.,

  1. Written critiques
  2. Rationales for treatment and assessments
  3. Research papers
  4. Professional presentations
  5. Examinations

Indicators of Success:

  • Observations and performance in the classroom and in clinical settings
    • Success in research paper writing assignments embedded in the curriculum
    • Increased student presentation and publications
    • Success of students’ job placements upon graduation

Strategies to Achieve Outcomes:

  1. Consider reorganizing the curriculum so that research methods are taught in the first year and are reinforced in coursework throughout the curriculum.
  2. To provide formative and summative assessment that will demonstrate students' abilities to:
    1. Critique professional literature
    2. Determine the level of evidence demonstrated in clinical research efficacy studies
    3. Identify prominent researchers and their areas of interest
    4. Seek answers to clinical questions in research findings

Focus 3: Promote and enhance clinical reasoning/decision-making skills                   

Envisioned Future:

Our graduate students will demonstrate clinical reasoning and decision making skills that are needed in the field of speech-language pathology to facilitate adequate assessment and intervention of individuals with various communication and swallowing disorders.  Our students will be able to integrate theory and clinical practice to better serve those individuals in their caseload.

Issues:

The development of clinical reasoning and decision-making skills is an essential component to ensure the competency of speech-language pathologists and the quality of care they provide to patients, clients and families. Academic and professional success requires the acquisition of valid scientific and clinical evidence and the ability to make appropriate decisions in clinically based situations. Student clinicians should demonstrate the ability to modify their thinking, make suitable clinical adjustments and evaluate outcomes to ensure patients and/or clients receive appropriate assessment and treatment options.

Outcomes:

Program curriculum will present students with various opportunities to increase the development of clinical reasoning/decision-making skills. Several learning methods will be presented inside the classroom, online and/or outside clinical settings to facilitate improvement of these skills.

Indicators of Success:

  • Students' satisfactory performance on formative and summative assessments including demonstrations of clinical proficiency in real and/or simulated environments.

Strategies to Achieve Outcomes:

  • Engage in effective questioning to activate the students' knowledge and facilitate the appropriate evaluation of situations
  • Provide feedback including objective data, narratives or written descriptions of specific behaviors
  • Present subjective data such as rating scales to assess students' performance and promote improvement in overall clinical skills
  • Assign readings, tutorials and online modules
    • Establish collaborative learning through simulation and case studies/presentations
    • Encourage reflective practice through use of self-evaluation tools, journals, portfolios, review of video-recorded sessions and clinical supervisor observations/evaluations

Focus 4: Promote cultural competence and a culture of inclusion

Envisioned Future: In accord with our program mission and the mission of the University, our graduate students will demonstrate an appreciation and awareness of cultural and linguistic diversity to better serve individuals with communication and swallowing disorders.

Issues:

Cultural competence is crucial for the delivery of speech-language services appropriate for clients having diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Students in the program will:

  • Exhibit understanding of how his or her own personal cultural and linguistic variables impact delivery of services to clients and their families
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the various cultural and linguistic factors presented by the individuals receiving services
    • Evidence knowledge of the cultural and linguistic variables that impact the interaction of the clients being served and their caregivers in order to effectively provide services
    • Demonstrate understanding of the characteristics (e.g., age, demographics, cultural and linguistic diversity, educational history and status, medical history and status, cognitive status, physical and sensory abilities) of the clients being provided services and how these characteristics impact service delivery

Outcomes:

The program will present students with opportunities to learn and demonstrate proficiency in working with linguistically and culturally diverse clients. Encourage students to reflect on and discuss their own cultural/ethnic backgrounds and how their background can influence their interactions with those around them

Indicators of Success:

Evidence of multicultural and bilingual emphasis in coursework and symposia; student performance on linguistically and culturally diverse learning outcomes.

Strategies to Achieve Outcomes:

  • Provide students with opportunities to work with clients from a wide variety of cultural and linguistic backgrounds in external clinical sites and our on-site clinic
  • Continue to ensure that program coursework is infused with information related to bilingualism, multiculturalism, and inclusion
  • Mandatory student participation in symposiums regarding issues related to bilingualism, multiculturalism, inclusion, and international perspectives

Focus 5: Promote knowledge of technology and instrumentation related to the field of

Speech-Language Pathology

Envisioned Future: Our graduate students will demonstrate knowledge of varied technology and instrumentation available in the field to facilitate client success during assessment and intervention

Issues: In the dynamic world of speech-language pathology technological advancement is the bedrock for its continued growth.  It is imperative that our graduate students become knowledgeable of the technology and instrumentation available to the field. 

Outcomes:

The program will continue to provide students with numerous opportunities to implement use of technology and instrumentation in the classroom and clinical/professional settings e.g.

  1. Diagnostic assessment
  2. Intervention planning and implementing
  3. Research projects

Indicators of Success:

  • Observation and performance in the classroom and in the clinical setting
  • Evidence of technology and instrumentation in coursework

Strategies to Achieve Outcomes:

  • Provide students with hands-on experience of technology and instrumentation related to the field
  • Technology and instrumentation embedded into course work as it relates to course content

Facilitate use of technology and instrumentation within the student’s in-house clinical experiences as deemed appropriate


Faculty

Catherine Crowley
Dr. Catherine C. Crowley is an assistant professor within the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Long Island University-Post.  Dr. Crowley has also served as an adjunct professor at Adelphi University.  She is a bilingual ASHA certified speech-language pathologist at Long Island Jewish Medical Center.  Her clinical experience is in various settings including acute and subacute facilities, private practice, homecare, and elementary schools.  Dr. Crowley specializes in adult speech, language, and swallowing disorders, with an interest in head and neck cancer.  Dr. Crowley completed her doctoral work at Adelphi University.  Her doctoral focus was on the effects of deep brain stimulation surgery on speech and language function.   Her current research project is investigating the relationship between stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with head and neck cancer and dysphagia.  Additionally, she is currently investigating risk factors associated with Dysphagia in the setting of COVID-19.  Dr. Crowley maintains membership in the American Speech Language Hearing Association (ASHA), Dysphagia Research Society, and the New York Neuropsychology Group (NYNG).  Dr. Crowley has presented on topics including head and neck cancer and deep brain stimulation surgery.

Nassima Abdelli-Beruh 
Dr. Nassima Abdelli-Beruh is a speech scientist with a background in experimental and cognitive psychology. She has earned a Ph.D. in speech and hearing sciences from The Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY). She acquired a comprehensive background in psychology and neurophysiology at the University of Paris-X and Paris VI in France. She was an assistant professor at NYU for four years before joining the Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders at the C.W. Post Campus in September 2006. Since earning her Ph.D. in 2002, she has developed three research tracks: the first focuses on the production of the voicing contrast by Parisian French; the second is centered on the acoustic underpinnings of the rule of regressive voicing assimilation in French stops, with the aim to explore the phonology-phonetic interface; and the third explores the relationship between language and speech through a series of studies on the acoustic cues to the production and perception of idioms in Parisian French and American English.

John Amato
John Amato Jr. is a speech-language pathologist with clinical and research experience in the areas of neurogenic-based communication and swallowing disorders in infants, children and adults. Areas of research have included oral motor and oral feeding disorders in preschool children with autism, language and play in preschool children with autism, language and socialization in children with Asperger Syndrome, syndrome identification in children with hypernasal speech disorders, swallowing disorders in Parkinson's disease, the use of sEMG in assessment and treatment of swallowing disorders, and the use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in treatment of swallowing disorders in patients with head and neck cancer.

Robert Domingo
Dr. Robert Domingo, a past president of the Long Island Speech-Language-Hearing Association (LISHA) and past member of the Board of Directors for the New York State Speech-Language-Hearing Association (NYSSLHA) as Universities and Labs representative, is a certified and licensed speech-language pathologist. He teaches courses at both the undergraduate and graduate University levels. His clinical background includes expertise in adult language habilitation and rehabilitation, motor speech disorders, neuroanatomy, autism and developmental disabilities, swallowing disorders, and alternative and augmentative communication; as well as pediatric language acquisition, phonology and articulation, and school-based language intervention.   His current interest lies in the facilitation and development of social communication skills in individuals with ASD or other communication deficits, through the use of improvisation.

Lori Newman
Lori M. Newman is a certified and licensed speech-language pathologist who serves as the Assistant Clinic Director of the Ladge Speech and Hearing Center, as well as an Assistant Professor within the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at LIU Post. Her clinical background is in pediatrics with specialty areas in autism spectrum disorder and early childhood development.

Gabriella Reynolds
Gabriella Reynolds, PhD., CCC-SLP is a certified speech language pathologist who specializes in early literacy, dyslexia, and varying levels of hearing loss. She received her Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina where she focused on children with minimal hearing loss and early literacy skills of preschool children with hearing loss. She completed her undergraduate work in linguistics and received a Master’s degree from Gallaudet, a Deaf university. Before returning to academia to pursue a PhD, she worked for several years as a speech-language pathologist at a school for children with learning disabilities. Gabriella’s academic and clinical background give her a unique insight into the difficulties of these populations. Her current work focuses on academic skills in children with mild-moderate hearing loss, development of conversational and social skills in children with hearing loss, and comparing skills targeted in a virtual versus in person phonological awareness intervention.

ADJUNCT FACULTY

Natalie Anatol
Kristin Hennessy
Theresa Blumenthal
Jan Downey
Terry Gozdziewski
Joseph Hoffman
Loren Kuppelmeyer
Tanya Linzalone
Karen MacLennan
Linda Orgel
Joanne Quinoa
Mindy Schnell
Steffi Schopick
Nicole Westphal

Ladge Speech and Hearing Center

Students observe and participate in clinical sessions with real clients at the Jerrold Mark Ladge Speech and Hearing Center, located on campus. The Ladge Speech and Hearing Center offers a full range of diagnostic and therapeutic services for children and adults individually and/or in small groups.

EXPLORE


Accreditation and Student Outcome Data

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Scholarship Opportunities

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CONTACT

School of Health Professions and Nursing
Dr. Denise Walsh, Dean
Life Science, Room 154
post-shpn@liu.edu