Technology, Innovation, and Computer Science

B.S. in Computer Science


The 120-credit B.S. in Computer Science degree focuses on the concepts and techniques used in the design and the development of advanced software systems, network designs and applications. Students in this program explore the conceptual foundations of computer science – its fundamental algorithms, programming languages, operating systems and software engineering techniques. In addition, they can choose from innovative electives, including artificial intelligence, database systems, graphical user interfaces, web development, e-commerce and computer networks, and system and network administration among others. As with the introductory sequence, these advanced courses stress hands-on learning.

Graduates of the B.S. in Computer Science program have gone on to highly successful careers with Bloomberg, JPMorgan Chase, Accenture, MTA, DOT, New York City government agencies, Con Edison, NYU Medical Center, and other technology-based corporations.


Program Curriculum

Course # Course Name Credits
Required B.S. in Computer Science Courses
(41 Credits)
CS 101 Fundamentals of Computer Science and Information Sciences 3
CS 102 Programming l
CS 117  Programing ll 4
CS 118 Computer Architecture
CS 130  Algorithms and Data Structure 
CS 132 Discrete Structures in Computer Science
CS 148 Database Management
CS 150  Operating Systems 
CS 154  Networking 
CS 164  Software Engineering 3
MAN 231
Managerial Communications
BUS 228
Business Statistics l

 Advanced Computer Science Electives
(13 Credits of any Computer Science courses numbered over 102)
 Business or Computer Science Electives
(9 Credits of any introductory or advanced courses offered by the School of Business, Public Administration and Information Sciences)

Orientation
(1 Credit)

 FYS 01  First-Year Seminar 1


Course # Course Name Credits
Required Core Courses
(34-35 Credits)
English Composition
ENG 16/ ENG 16C English Composition 3
English Literature
Select one (1) course from the following:
ENG 61 European Literatures I 3
ENG 62 European Literatures II 3
ENG 63 American Literatures 3
ENG 64 Global Literatures 3
History
Select one (1) course from the following:
HIS 1 Perspectives in Pre-modern World History 3
HIS 2 Perspectives in Modern World History 3
Philosophy
PHI 60 Philosophical Explorations 3
Speech
SPE 3 Oral Communication 3
Mathematics
Select one (1) course from the following, unless major requirements list specific Math courses:
MTH 15 Math Tools and Their Use 4
MTH 16 Finite Mathematics 3
Science Lab-Based Course
Select one (1) course from the following:
BIO Biology 4
CHM Chemistry 4
PHY Physics 4
Foreign Language
Select one (1) course from the following:
SPA 11 Introductory Spanish I 3
SPA 12 Introductory Spanish II 3
ITL 11 Introductory Italian I 3
ITL 12 Introductory Italian II 3
FRE 11 Introductory French I 3
FRE 12 Introductory French II 3
Visual and Performing Arts
Select one (1) course from the following:
ART 61 Introduction to Visual Art 3
DNC 61 Dance Through Time 3
JOU 61 Journalism, Social Media, and You 3
MA 61 Media Arts and Technology 3
MUS 61 Music and Culture 3
THE 61 The Theatrical Vision 3
Social Sciences I
Select any introductory course from the following:
Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology 3
Social Sciences II
Select any introductory course from the following:
Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology 3
 Required General Electives*
(21-22 Credits from any courses)

Credit Requirements*
Total Major Requirement Credits 41
Elective Major Credits 22
Orientation 1
Total General Elective Credits* 21-22
Total Core Requirement Credits 34-35
Total Degree Credits 120

* Minimum Advanced Credit Requirement: 48

Courses

ART 61 Introduction to Visual Art

In our increasingly visual culture, it is important to look critically at the imagery that surrounds us. It is equally important to experience and understand art from many cultures and time periods so we may appreciate the wide variety of artworks created by people around the world, from past to present. Students will learn to analyze both form and content in art and communicate their understanding to others. Students will see and discuss a broad selection of art at museums, galleries, online, and in the classroom. The class will also engage in hands-on studio projects and explore a range of materials and personal artistic expression.

Credits: 3

All Sessions


BUS 228 Business Statistics I

A study of the foundations in statistical methods as they apply to the analysis of business conditions and projections. Topics covered include: graphic and tabular representations, measure of central tendency and dispersion, probability, binomial and normal distributions, sampling distributions and hypothesis testing, simple regression and correlation analysis, and index numbers. The pre-requisite of MTH 16 or MTH 30 or MTH 40 is required.

Credits: 3

Every Fall


CS 101 Fundamentals of Computer Science and Information Sciences
Course topics include computer organization, information processing, algorithms, and programming. Operating Systems, Databases, and Computer Networks,  along with current views on the theory and practice of Software Engineering, and the basics of Artificial Intelligence are also explored.  Three lecture hours, one hour lab.
Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring



CS 102 Fundamentals of Computer Science and Information Sciences

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of programming from an object-oriented perspective. Topics are drawn from classes and objects, abstraction, encapsulation, data types, calling methods and passing parameters, decisions, loops, strings, arrays and collections, documentation, testing and debugging, design issues, and inheritance. The course emphasizes modern software engineering and design. Three hours lecture, one hour laboratory. The pre-requisite of CS 101 is required.

Credits: 4

Every Fall and Spring


CS 117 Object Oriented Programming II

This course covers  the most advanced features of the C++ programming language that are essential to the creation of complex structures and their applications in designing and  developing programs using software engineering concepts : structures, objects and classes, function and operator overloading, collections, strings, recursion, file and string streams, pointers and dynamic data structures, inheritance and dynamic polymorphism, templates, exception handling, Standard Template Library (STL),  and advanced C++ topics. Three hours lecture, one hour laboratory. The pre-requisite of CS 102 is required.

Credits: 4



Every Fall and Spring


CS 118 Computer Architecture

The course provides a comprehensive study of computer architecture and organization. Boolean algebra is introduced to teach digital devices. The operational units and their interconnections that realize the architectural specification of a computer are studied and their overall performance is analyzed. The design and implementation of a simple processor is an integral part of the course. Programming at different levels is also introduced. Pre-requisite of CS 102 is required.

Credits: 3
Every Fall


CS 130 Algorithms and Data Structures I

A study of the design and representation of information and storage structures and their associated implementation in a block-structured language; linear lists, strings, stacks, queues, multi-linked structures, representation of trees and graphs, iterative and recursive programming techniques; storage systems, structures and allocation; file organization and maintenance; and sorting and searching algorithms. Three hours lecture, one hour laboratory. Pre-requisite of CS 117 is required.

Credits: 3

Every Fall


CS 132 Discrete Structures in Computer Science

A study of the treatment of discrete mathematical structures and relevant algorithms used in the programming and computer science. Topics include the list, tree, set, relational and graph data models and their representation and use in searching, sorting and traversal algorithms; also, simulation, recursive algorithms and programming, analysis of running time of algorithms, and an introduction to finite-state machines and automata. Three hours lecture, one hour laboratory. Pre-requisite of CS 130 is required.

Credits: 3

Every Spring


CS 148, CIS 148 Database Systems I

The course is designed to impart the concepts and the practical aspects of database management systems and to provide an understanding of how data resources can be designed and managed to support information systems in organizations. Topics covered include: database system functions, Entity-relationship (E-R) modeling and relational database model, basic normalization techniques, data integrity, and SQL query language. Three hours lecture, one hour laboratory.  The pre-requisite of CS 101 is required.

Credits: 4



Every Spring


CS 150 Operating Systems

An introduction to the fundamental concepts of operating systems: architectural support and operating systems interface; system calls; and process structure, concepts, management, interprocess communication, threads, memory management and virtual memory, file system interface and its implementation. Case studies from UNIX and Windows NT are examined. Three hours lecture, one hour laboratory. pre-requisite of CS 117 is required.

Credits: 4

Every Spring


CS 154


CS 164 Software Engineering

A study of software project management concepts, software cost estimation, quality management, process involvement, overview of analysis and design methods, user interface evaluation, and design. Also considered are dependable systems  - software reliability, programming for reliability, reuse, safety-critical systems, verification and validation techniques; object-oriented development; using UML; and software maintenance. Three hours lecture, one hour laboratory. Pre-requisite of CS 130 is required.

Credits: 3

Every Spring


 DNC 61 Dance Through Time

A look at dance in its time and place, with an eye to simultaneous development of corresponding art forms, lifestyles and government involvement in the arts. A survey is offered of the many forms that dance encompasses through an understanding of style, content, and time and place of origin, most lectures will be accompanied by videos, studio work or any of the previous combination. Satisfies the core art 61 requirement.

Credits: 3

Every Fall and Spring 


ENG 16 English Composition

English 16 seeks to initiate a dialogue among students that leads them to write with more than

their own "personal" position in mind: the readings and classroom discussions give the sense that they are entering an ongoing conversation of consequence. To this end, students in English 16 are required to integrate the thoughts and words of other writers into their own essays. Both in relation to their own experience and to a text or set of texts, student writers in English 16 learn how to articulate and develop a sophisticated argument within a specific rhetorical situation. Three classroom hours per week. Part of Core requirement. One of the following prerequisites is required:  ENG 14; 

  • Placement Exam

  • 610 or higher on Evidence Based Reading & Writing SAT

  • 30 or higher on Reading SAT

  • 25 or high on ACT Assessment; 31 or high on Writing & Language SAT

Credits: 3

Every Semester 


ENG 16X English Composition for Nonnative Speakers

English 16X is a course parallel to English 16 for nonnative speakers who needs additional work in English as a Second Language. Three hours per week. Letter grades and U. This course has an additional fee. The pre-requisite of ENG 14X or the placement exam is required.

Credits: 3

On Occasion 


ENG 61 European Literatures I

An examination of significant works of literature from Ancient Greece and Rome and Medieval and Renaissance Italy, France, Germany and England. Intensive readings from epics, sacred books, poems, plays and tales -- arranged chronologically or thematically. All texts read in English. Pre-requisite of ENG 16 is required.

Credits: 3

Every Semester


ENG 62 European Literatures II

An examination of significant works of European literature, from the 18th Century to the present. Intensive readings from a wide representation of texts - novels, poems, plays and essays – arranged chronologically or thematically. All texts read in English. Pre-requisite of ENG 16 is required.

Credits: 3

Every Semester 


ENG 63 American Literatures

A survey of the literatures and traditions of the United States from Colonial times to the present,

with attention paid to the larger context of literary traditions across all the Americas - North America, the Caribbean, Latin America. Arranged chronologically or thematically. All texts read in English. Pre-requisite of ENG 16 is required.

Credits: 3

Every Semester 


ENG 64 Global Literatures

Drawing primarily from the literatures of Africa and Asia, each section focuses on at least two

geographical areas, such as Western Africa, China, India, Japan, Southeast Asia or the Pacific Islands. Broad sweeps of time may be covered or specific periods of high cultural achievements such as the Tang Dynasty, Medieval Japan or West Africa before the European invasion may be highlighted. Topics for individual sections will appear in the Schedule of Classes. All texts read in English. Pre-requisite of ENG 16 is required.

Credits: 3

Every Semester


FRE 11 Introductory French I

Introductory speaking, reading and understanding French with emphasis on contemporary culture.

Credits: 3

Every Fall and Spring 


FRE 12 Introductory French II

Introductory speaking, reading and understanding French with emphasis on contemporary culture. Pre-requisite of FRE 11 is required.

Credits: 3

Every Fall and Spring


HIS 1 Perspectives in Pre-modern World History

A thematic approach to topics in World History that examines content from the history of civilization in at least two geographical regions (Africa, the Americas, Asia, the Middle East or Europe) up to the Modern Era (c. 18th century). All courses are aimed at discovering the nature of historical inquiry, including both an examination of historical facts, and also the importance of perspective, context, and causality in the creation of a historical argument. Topics will be chosen by the faculty member.

Credits: 3

All Sessions 


HIS 2 Perspectives in Modern World History

A thematic approach to topics in World History that examines content from the history of civilization in at least two geographical regions (Africa, the Americas, Asia, the Middle East or

Europe) from 1500 to present. All courses are aimed at discovering the nature of historical inquiry, including both an examination of historical facts, and the importance of perspective, context, and causality in the creation of a historical argument. Topics will be chosen by the faculty member.

Credits: 3

All Sessions 


ITL 11 Introductory Italian I

Introductory speaking, reading and understanding Italian with emphasis on contemporary culture.

Credits: 3

Every Fall


ITL 12 Introductory Italian II

Introductory speaking, reading and understanding Italian with emphasis on contemporary culture. Pre-requisite of ITL 11 is required.

Credits: 3

Every Spring 


JOU 61 Journalism, Social Media & You

Examines a wide range of news shared through social media, with attention to the political, economic, democratic, and satirical motives of diverse media creators. Considers the role of new technologies and the proliferation of fake news, propaganda, hoaxes, rumors, and advertising on the Internet. Explores principles and practices of credible journalism, such as objectivity and balance. Students develop news-literacy skills and learn to evaluate and curate their social-media newsfeeds. Satisfies the Arts core requirement.

Credits: 3

Every Fall and Spring


MAN 231 Managerial Communications

A vital skill of any aspiring business executive is the ability to write clearly and concisely. In every field of business the emphasis is on communication both within the organization as well as outside it. This course develops the student's ability to read critically, to evaluate information, to present evidence to support conclusions, and to make recommendations in an effective written business style. This is a Writing-Across-the-Curriculum (WAC) Course. Prerequisites: SPE 3 or 3X or HSP 21, HEG 21 and HEG 22

Credits: 3

Every Spring


MTH 16 Finite Mathematics

Selected topics from matrix algebra, linear programming, consumer mathematics, probability,sets and counting techniques. Students who have taken MAT 15 or 11Y are exempt from MAT 16. One of the following prerequisites is required:

  • DSM 09

  • MW 9

  • Placement Exam

  • 500 or higher on MATH SAT

  • 22 or higher on ACT Assessment

Credits: 3

All Sessions


MUS 61 Music and Culture

An introduction to musical styles that places music in its cultural context: history, painting, literature and ideas. To enhance the capacity to understand and enjoy music of every kind, the course begins with the elements of music that a composer combines in distinctive and characteristic ways to form a musical composition. Satisfies the core arts requirement.

Credits: 3

Every Semester


 

PHI 60 Philosophical Explorations

PHI 60 is an integrated core course that introduces students to the basic concepts and methods of elementary logic and philosophical inquiry, while emphasizing the critical intellectual skills needed both in philosophical reflection and in coping with the many practical challenges of modern living. Students will learn to avoid common fallacies in

informal reasoning and argumentation, to distinguish good from bad reasoning generally, and to engage in general problem solving, productive dialogue, and effective communication. They will engage in responsive and critical writing, while being guided in close reading and discussion of important philosophical texts from ancient times and the modern world. They will also become acquainted with some major traditions of ethical thought and the central problems of contemporary moral philosophy, while sharing, examining, sharpening and refining their own ethical sensibilities and values. The course as a whole will aid them in becoming more informed, methodical, and incisive thinkers, better able to exercise their voices as active citizens in the public sphere.

Credits: 3

Every Semester


PHI 61


PHI 62


SPA 11 Introductory Spanish I

Introductory speaking, reading, writing and understanding Spanish.

Credits: 3

Every Fall, Spring and Summer


SPA 12 Introductory Spanish II

Introductory speaking, reading, writing and understanding Spanish. Pre-requisite: SPA 11, HLS 21 or its equivalent. The pre-requisite of SPA 11 or HLS 21 is required.

Credits: 3

Every Fall, Spring and Summer


SPE 3 Oral Communication

An introduction to communication theory and interpersonal skills. Students develop oral presentation techniques, including public speaking, group discussion and oral readings. Evaluation of individual student speech through analysis of voice and diction is conducted.

Credits: 3

Every Semester


THE 61 The Theatrical Vision

This core course gives students an overall experience and understanding of the art and craft of Theatre and the process of making it happen. Students learn about the history of theatre, the visual and kinaesthetic elements of production and performance, the audience as spectators, how to read and analyze plays and the use of space in creating the theatre experience for both performer and audience.

Credits: 3

Every Semester


CONTACT

School of Business, Public Administration & Information Sciences

Ray Pullaro, Dean

718-488-1130
Ray.Pullaro@liu.edu