Communication Sciences and Disorders

M.A. in Speech-Language Pathology


Imagine the satisfaction of helping a child say his/her first words to his/her family or caregiver, or assisting an adult stroke patient to communicate with his family and friends. With the specialized, advanced training provided by the 58-credit Master of Arts in Speech-Language Pathology you will be equipped for a career diagnosing and treating a wide range of speech, language, swallowing and hearing disorders. 

The Master of Arts (M.A.) program in speech-language pathology at LIU Post is designed to mentor and educate students to become competent, caring, qualified and accountable speech-language pathologists who in turn will be well equipped to serve clients in a culturally and linguistically diverse society. Our goal is to provide students with a comprehensive program, built upon a sound theoretical foundation in speech, language and hearing sciences, in which clinical skill development is integrated. Educational and clinical experiences will be guided by a strong adherence to evidence based practice.  Strong clinical reasoning, decision making, and communication skills will be developed through training and supervised practice.  Students will be required to demonstrate high standards of competency and ethical conduct within the scope of professional practice. An important element in our training of MA candidates includes inter-professional educational opportunities where students can learn from and work closely with other disciplines. Simulated experiences at our state of the art Simlab and with computerized simulators assists students to be prepared for clinical interaction and to practice their skills. We seek to guide our students through the program by providing advisement, instruction, as well as clinical and intellectual challenges. Our program goals are both formative and summative in accordance with standards of our professional accrediting organization, the Council of Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology. Upon completion of the program our students will be prepared to function in our pluralistic society as speech-language pathologists working alongside allied health professionals and educators in a variety of settings serving the needs of children and adults throughout the lifespan. In terms of employment, our graduates have enjoyed a high employment rate in a variety of pediatric and adult sites on Long Island, New York City and across the country.

Courses examine all facets of the field, including:  Articulation/speech sound disorders, fluency, voice and resonance, language and literacy, hearing, feeding and swallowing, cognitive aspects of communication, social aspects of communication and augmentative and assistive communication across the lifespan. Central to your training will be 5 clinical practica:  a pre-clinic experience, two in the on- campus clinic, the 3rd in a school-related setting, and the 4th preferably in a hospital, rehabilitation center or other adult facility. If the student follows their plan to study as initially established, attends full time and satisfactorily completes all classes, the program is usually completed in two to 2 1/2 years inclusive of summers.

The Master of Arts (M.A.) education program in speech- language pathology at LIU Post is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation (CAA) in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology of the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA), 2200 Research Boulevard, #310, Rockville MD 20850, (800) 498-2071 or (301) 296-5700. As a prerequisite for admittance, and undergraduate degree in a communication sciences and disorders is preferred, but a background in another area will be considered. In addition to ASHA certification, the program meets the requirements for New York State licensure and New York State teacher certification.

LIU Post ranked in the top 100 Graduate Programs on Speech-Language Pathology

Read more here

All applicants to the Master of Arts in Speech-Language Pathology program must complete the Common Application at CSDCAS. 

CSDCAS Applicant Portal Linkhttps://csdcas.liaisoncas.com/applicant-ux/#/login

Admission is for the spring & fall semester. The LIU Post CSDCAS Deadline is February 15. Applicants must have a complete application by the deadline date posted. A complete application requires that the application is e-submitted and all transcripts, and payments, have been received by CSDCAS. Documents should be sent to CSDCAS several weeks prior to the deadline date to ensure all items arrive on time. 

CSDCAS Customer Service is available Monday thru Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Phone: 617-612-2030
Email: csdcasinfo@csdcas.org
Address (All official transcripts MUST be sent to CSDCAS at the address below):

CSDCAS Verification Department
P.O. Box 9113
Watertown, MA 02471
Note: CSDCAS posts Frequently Asked Questions on the applicant portal, which can be accessed even before an application is created. Please read the FAQs before submitting your application.



Admissions Requirements

Applicants to the Master of Arts in Speech-Language Pathology will complete the Common Application at CSDCAS. 

CSDCAS Applicant Link

CSDCAS Customer Service Information 

CSDCAS Customer Service is available Monday thru Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Phone: 617-612-2030
Email: csdcasinfo@csdcas.org
Address (All official transcripts MUST be sent to CSDCAS at the address below):
CSDCAS Verification Department
P.O. Box 9113
Watertown, MA 02471

Admission is for the fall and spring semesters.  The LIU Post CSDCAS Deadline for fall is February 15th and for Spring it is December 1st.  Applicants must have a complete application by the deadline date posted. A complete application requires that the application is e-submitted and all transcripts, and payments, have been received by CSDCAS. Documents should be sent to CSDCAS several weeks prior to the deadline date to ensure all items arrive on time. 
Visit the Submitting an Application for Admission page for additional information.

Candidates for the Master of Arts in Speech-Language Pathology must have completed the following prerequisites or their equivalent. 

SPE 51 Phonetics of English 3
SPE 63 Introduction to Linguistics and Language Acquisition 3
SPE 82 Introduction to Speech Science 3
SPE 84 Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism 3
SPE 90 Introduction to Audiology 3
SPE 93 Speech  Pathology 1 3
SPE 94 Speech Pathology 2 3
EDU 14 Historical, Philosophical and Sociological Foundations of Education (Recommended)
and
EDU 41A Nurturing Young Children's Development (Recommended) 
3

Each applicant’s academic background and training will be evaluated to determine if he or she needs to complete any prerequisite courses. Prerequisite work will not count toward the 58-credit master’s degree requirements. For admission to the program, an undergraduate degree in communication sciences and disorders is preferred, but a background in other areas will be considered along with prerequisite work required before the master’s program.
Admission is restricted and requires a minimum undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 and 3.0 average in the major area. In addition,  a GRE requirement of 145 in Math, 145 in Verbal and 4.0 in Writing is preferred. An interview may also be required. 

The program requires completion of at least 58 master’s-level credits. The degree candidate selects either a thesis (additional 3 credits) or comprehensive examination option to complete the program and prepare for the Praxis exam. 
During the five-semester sequence of clinical practica, students will not be able to work full-time. These courses require several days and evenings per week in academic and clinical pursuits and represent a full-time commitment. 


Course Descriptions

SPE 601 Neuroanatomy
This course is designed to provide the graduate student with a working knowledge of the central nervous system and connections with the peripheral nervous system.  Anatomical landmarks and functions of the central nervous system will be emphasized as well as its role in human behavior and communicative disorders across the life span.  Various pathologies of the nervous system will be examined. Its goal is to familiarize the student with basic brain behaviors. It is particularly useful to those students who choose to work with neurologically impaired children and adults.
Prerequisite: SPE 84, SPE 82
Fall, 3 Credits

SPE 610 Speech Science
This course provides an overview of acoustics and speech production with an emphasis on the acoustic phonetic analysis of the speech signal. Laboratory exercises provide hands-on experience that integrates theory with clinical practice.
Prerequisite: SPE 51, SPE 84 and SPE 82 
Fall and Spring, 3 Credits

SPE 620 Clinical Methods and Focused Observation in Speech-Language Pathology
This one credit seminar provides students in Speech-Language Pathology with an introduction to clinical methods used in prevention, evaluation and treatment of communication and related disorders across the life span. Students have an opportunity to observe sessions in the Ladge Speech and Hearing Center, and participate in lectures, videotape analysis, seminar participation and role playing to better understand the thought process for session planning and administration. 
Experiences are supervised by the clinic director and supervisory staff. The seminar class focuses on the review and discussion of theoretical and procedural information as well as clinical observations. The class is designed to prepare students for SPE 625 in which they will be engaged in direct clinical interactions. Students also participate in experimental learning in the Ladge Speech and Hearing Center and the community.  
Every semester, 1 credit

SPE 625 Clinical Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology I
This course provides the graduate student in speech-language pathology with an overview of the evaluation and therapeutic process with a limited amount of hands-on clinical experience. The course covers fundamental concepts in client - clinician interaction, the clinical process, clinical vocabulary, and the supervisory process. Students participate in lecture seminar, clinical observation and therapy as well as analysis of clinical sessions. Lecture for one hour weekly plus observation and directly supervised clinical interaction with one to three clients over the semester in the Ladge Speech and Hearing Center is included. A minimum of 25 hours of guided observation (15 hours must be at the Ladge Speech and Hearing Center) is required prior to registration for this class. Prerequisite: SPE 620                                                                                     
Every Semester, 2 Credits

SPE 626 Practicum in Diagnostic Evaluation of Communication Disorders
This supervised clinical practicum is offered in conjunction with SPE 633, Diagnostic Procedures in Speech Language Pathology. It provides students with hands-on experience in screening and evaluation of children and adults with communication disorders.
Fall and Summer, 1 Credit

SPE 627 Lab Experience in Audiology
This practicum provides students with an understanding through observation of audiology and aural rehabilitation services conducted at the Ladge Speech and Hearing Center as well as an opportunity for students to conduct hearing screenings at the Center and at outside sites.
Every Semester, 1 Credit 

SPE 628 Clinical Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology II
This course is a hands-on experience in providing evaluation and treatment directly supervised by the Communication Sciences and Disorders faculty and clinic staff in the LIU Post Campus Ladge Speech and Hearing Center. Seminar once a week to discuss clients, clinical procedures, and professional issues includes the ASHA current Code of Ethics, licensure and C.C.C.
Prerequisites: SPE 625, SPE 685, SPE 687 (1 complete, 1 concurrent), SPE 689
Every Semester, 2 Credits

SPE 629 Clinical Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology V (optional)
Additional hands-on experience in providing evaluation and treatment in Speech-Language Pathology and related disorders. Remediation practicum.
Every Semester as needed, 1 to 3 Credits

SPE 630 Clinical Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology VI (optional)
Additional hands-on experience in providing evaluation and treatment in Speech-Language Pathology and related disorders.
Every Semester as needed, 1-3 Credits

SPE 631 Clinical Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology IV
This course provides clinical experience with adults, in off-site facilities including hospitals, rehabilitation centers, and developmental disability centers. Supervision is provided by qualified personnel at off-campus affiliated sites. This course includes a weekly seminar. 
Prerequisite: SPE 625, SPE 628, SPE 633, SPE 685, or SPE 691
Every Semester, 3 Credits

SPE 632/EDU 925 Clinical Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology III
This practicum is designed to partially fulfill requirements for the Teacher of students with Speech and Language Disabilities. The student becomes familiar with all aspects of the administration of speech/language services in a school and gradually assumes responsibility for caseload management. This course includes weekly seminar. 
Prerequisite: SPE 628, SPE 633
Every Semester, 3 Credits

SPE 633 Diagnostic Procedures in Speech-Language Pathology
This course covers assessment procedures, formulation of diagnostic impressions, and development of recommendations. Initial therapeutic goals are taught through a combination of lecture, observation and participation in diagnostic sessions. Diagnostic principles and procedures including interviewing, testing and report writing are stressed. 
Prerequisite: SPE 685, SPE 687 (1 complete, 1 concurrent)
Fall and Summer, 3 Credits

SPE 634 PASS: Practical Applications for School-Based Speech Language Pathologists                                                                                             This course will provide graduate students with the knowledge of practical applications for the school based Teacher of Students with Speech and Language Disabilities. This course will focus on who, what, where, why and how to effectively work in schools. Areas to be addressed will include: organizational procedures: caseload determination, scheduling, writing IEP’s, therapy strategies, literacy, teacher consultations and workshops plus professional and administrative responsibilities.
Fall and Summer, 3 credits

SPE 680 Swallowing Disorders in Children and Adults
This course involves the study of the anatomy and physiology of deglutition. This includes an overview of normal swallowing function across the lifespan (infants to adults). Disordered swallowing will be covered in depth re: etiologies and assessment and management in various settings. Ethical issues and the role of the speech-language pathologist as a part of the dysphagia team will be discussed, including inter-professional interactions. Current dysphagia issues, techniques and events will be reviewed. Methods of technological assessment including modified barium swallow studies, flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing will also be presented.
Prerequisites: SPE 601, SPE 685
Fall, 3 Credits

SPE 682 Voice Disorders
The fundamental goal of the course is to review the normal ventilatory, laryngeal and supralaryngeal function for voice production.  Additionally this course will provide students with an overview of clinical voice disorders, their classification, diagnosis and management across the lifespan.  The students will have an opportunity to obtain and interpret objective clinical measures of phonatory function using acoustic and physiologic measurement systems.  Inter-professional interaction and relationships will be discussed. This course will also review the assistive communicatve technology available for laryngectomees.
Fall and Spring, 3 Credits

SPE 684 Stuttering
This course covers the theoretical and clinical models related to the development, diagnosis and treatment of stuttering in children and adults. This course will provide graduate students with a theoretical knowledge necessary to make clinical judgments regarding diagnosis and treatment of individuals who stutter.
Fall and Spring, 3 Credits

SPE 685 Aphasia and Related Disorders
This course will explore the various language and cognitive disorders secondary to brain damage in the adult population. The main focus is primarily on acquired aphasia, but will also explore language concomitants including traumatic brain injury, right hemisphere dysfunction, and the dementias. Neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, and generalized physiological background will be discussed as well as the ways in which researchers have proceeded in the development of the understanding of aphasia and related disorders. Theory and research will be related to clinical practice including diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Inter-professional relationships and communication will be discussed to aid in the intervention and treatment of the aphasic patient.
Prerequisite: SPE 601
Spring, 3 Credits

SPE 687 Phonological and Articulation Disorders in Children
This course familiarizes the graduate student of speech/language pathology with the research in normal phonological development and its application to the assessment and treatment of phonologically impaired children. Phonological disorders are characterized with respect to recent developments in the field of linguistics, specifically in terms of distinctive features, phonological rules, and processes.
Prerequisite: SPE 601 or SPE 610 (1 complete, 1 concurrent)
Fall and Spring, 3 Credits

SPE 689 Child Language Disorders I
Normal acquisition of language is reviewed as a baseline for identifying language and learning disorders and delays. Characteristic features of speech and language in the language disordered child will be covered. Assessment procedures including standardized tests and language sample analysis will be emphasized. Strategies of intervention and implementation of functional therapy programs will be discussed. Units include interdisciplinary views of the child with speech, language, and communication challenges; issues in speech, language, communication; social-emotional and cognitive development related to specific language impairment, pervasive developmental delay, autism, intellectual disabilities, language learning disabilities, ADD and ADHD, multicultural populations and the non-verbal child. 
Fall and Spring, 3 Credits

SPE 690 Child Language Disorders II                                                           
This course will enable graduate students in speech-language pathology (SLP) to apply the fundamentals learned in the normal and disordered processes of speech, language and hearing to the classroom setting. SLP students will be challenged to question more traditional school-based clinical practices, such as relying on intervention conducted in separate settings, in light of an increased call for collaboration between regular and special educators and SLPs in the classroom. They will learn to serve the communicative needs of their clients through curriculum-based assessments and intervention.
Fall and Spring, 3 Credits

SPE 691 Motor Speech Disorders in Children and Adults
This course will provide graduate students in speech-language pathology with a comprehensive understanding regarding the nature and treatment of motor speech disorders that may result from: stroke, head trauma, progressive neurological diseases, cerebral palsy, developmental apraxia of speech, and developmental dysarthria. Content includes a review of anatomy and physiology of the central nervous system, a study of the physiologic correlates of the dysarthrias and the apraxias
Spring, 3 Credits

SPE 692 Aural Rehabilitation
This course provides the graduate student in speech pathology with a broad understanding of the principle theories and methodologies currently applied in aural rehabilitation of hearing impaired persons. The hearing aid as an instrument of rehabilitation is described as well as other assistive listening devices. Also included are techniques of speech reading and auditory training.
Prerequisite: SPE 90
Spring and Summer, 3 Credits

SPE 700 Independent Study in Speech-Language Pathology (Optional)

SPE 707 Research Problems in Speech-Language Pathology
This course provides students with an understanding of scientific methodology in communication sciences and disorders and information important to the development of skills necessary for critical evaluation of research. 
Fall and Summer, 3 Credits

SPE 708 Thesis Seminar (Optional) 
This course covers the preparation of the thesis. The completed thesis must be approved by a committee, and the writer must undergo an oral examination. Enrollment is restricted to students whose projects have been approved by the Speech and Hearing faculty. This course may replace the comprehensive examination.
Every Semester as needed, 3 Credits

Electives: 

SPE 681 Language Disorders in Autism and Severe Developmental Disabilities
The elective course covers the presentation of the linguistic characteristics of people with Autism and Intellectual Disabilities. The course emphasizes diagnosis, identification, intervention along with the social, emotional and cognitive aspects of language development. A functional communicative approach to language is taught. Augmentative communication and the use of technology is covered.
Prerequisite: SPE 601
Summer, 3 Credits

SPE 694 Communication-Based Intervention for Infants and Toddlers
This course involves students in a critical study of recent trends and materials for young language impaired infants and toddlers, birth through age three. Special attention is given to developmental approaches and mainstreaming.
Prerequisites: SPE 601, SPE 610, SPE 689 (concurrent)
Summer, 3 Credits

Degree Requirements

Courses Credits
SPE 601 Neuroanatomy 3
SPE 610 Speech Science 3
SPE 633 Diagnostic Procedures in Speech-Language Pathology 3
SPE 634 PASS: Practical Applications for School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists  3
SPE 680 Swallowing Disorders in Children and Adults  3
SPE 682 Voice Disorders 3
SPE 684 Stuttering 3
SPE 685 Aphasia and Related Disorder 3
SPE 687  Phonological and Articulation Disorders in Children  
SPE 689 Child Language Disorders I 3
SPE 690 Child Language Disorders II 3
SPE 691 Motor Speech Disorders in Children and Adults  3
SPE 692 Aural Rehabilitation 3
SPE 707 Research Problems in Speech - Language Pathology 3
SPE 708 Thesis Seminar  3
SPE 620 Clinical Methods and Focused Observation in Speech-Language Pathology 1
SPE 625 Clinical Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology I  2
SPE 626 Practicum in Diagnostic Evaluation of Communication Disorders 1
SPE 627 Practicum in Audiology 1
SPE 628 Clinical Practicum In Speech-Language Pathology II  2
SPE 629 Clinical Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology V 1-3 *
SPE 630 Clinical Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology VI   1-3 ** 
SPE 631 Clinical Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology IV 3
SPE 632 Clinical Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology III 3
* Remediation-When deemed necessary by faculty
** Additional practicum 

CHOOSE ONE OF THE FOLLOWING ELECTIVES:

Courses Credits
SPE 681 Language Disorders in Autism and Severe Developmental Disabilities  3
SPE 694 Communication Based Intervention for Infants and Toddlers 3

Clinical Experience

Clinical education in speech-language pathology emphasizes clinical mentoring designed to develop an increasing degree of clinical competency and self-evaluation in our graduate clinicians and future professionals. During the practicum sequence students acquire the necessary skills to provide speech, language, hearing, swallowing, communication and related services. Each student begins their clinical experience with a pre-clinic course followed by two semesters at the Ladge Speech and Hearing Center, where they provide a full range of diagnostic and therapeutic services for clients across the lifespan.  Students then complete two outside clinical placements where they continue to develop their clinical competency and skills. All clinical experiences may be adjusted to comply with COVID-19 guidelines. 

OUTSIDE PLACEMENTS

Outside placements are arranged by placement coordinator with the consultation from the students during the clinical sequence. There is a varied network of affiliations available giving the students opportunity to expand their clinical knowledge and growth outside of our in-house clinic. The placement process is highly individualized allowing students to have a say in their placements. 

STUDENT VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES
  • Conversational Partners
  • Extended Day Aphasia Center
  • Preschool screenings 
  • Communication programs for adults with developmental disabilities 
  • Communication programs for adults with social language deficits
  • Language program for elementary school age students in an underserviced population



 


Mission & Vision Statement

Communication Sciences and Disorders Departmental Vision Statement

The vision of our Master of Arts (MA) program in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) at LIU Post is to enhance interprofessional programs that incorporate training of its students in a variety of disciplines, to focus on a team concept that requires active engagement with other clinically and educationally oriented disciplines across the University, in both the School of Health Professions and Nursing (SHPN), and the College of Education, Information and Technology (CEIT). Our students in CSD will participate in increased learning, interactive and /or clinical activities with students from different departments in varied clinical and/or educational experiences.

Our students learn to address the myriad of communicative, cognitive, learning, physiological, emotional and behavioral needs of infants, children, adults and older adults in various settings throughout the lifespan. For example, in medically-based settings, our students in CSD interact with those training in nursing, nutrition, medical imaging, occupational and physical therapy to form coherent, cohesive rehabilitation units that address both acute and chronic medical issues in pediatric and adult patient populations. Further, in school-based settings, our students engage in meaningful team interactions with representation from the disciplines of counseling, literacy, elementary and secondary education, special education and health services, to address the learning goals of students.

The CSD department will continue to incorporate the latest teaching strategies, simulation experiences, clinical opportunities and technologies available in both medical, educational, and other settings to accomplish their vision of program development.

Communication Sciences and Disorders Departmental Mission Statement

The MA program in CSD is designed to mentor and educate students to become competent, caring, qualified and accountable speech-language pathologists who in turn will be well equipped to serve individuals through the life span, in a culturally and linguistically diverse society. Our mission is to provide students with a comprehensive program, built upon a sound theoretical foundation in speech, language and hearing sciences, in which clinical skill development is integrated. Academic and clinical experiences will be guided by a strong adherence to evidence based practice. Training emphasizes the development of critical thinking, decision-making, and communication skills applied to clinical situations in closely supervised environments with both real and simulated clients. Students are required to demonstrate high standards of competency and legal/ethical conduct within the scope of professional practice. One element in our training of MA candidates includes interprofessional educational opportunities where students can learn from and work closely with members of other disciplines. We seek to guide our students through the program by providing advisement, instruction, as well as clinical and intellectual challenges. Our program goals are both formative and summative in accordance with the standards of our professional accrediting organization, the Counsel of Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, of the American Speech, Language, and Hearing Association. Upon completion of the program, our students are prepared to function in our pluralistic society as speech-language pathologists working alongside allied health professionals and educators in a variety of settings serving the needs of infants, children, adults, and older adults throughout the lifespan.

Philosophically our mission is congruent with LIU Post, the School of Health Profession and Nursing and College of Education, Information and Technology, in the belief that education must be comprehensive and expansive providing both depth and breadth of knowledge. This notion relates especially well to the development of an expertise in normal and disordered communication through the life span and across the diversity within our society. The program's mission also relates to that of the University in that we foster dialogue with our students on many levels: through academic counseling, classroom instruction, clinical education and class evaluations.

Strategic Plan 2020-2023

Focus on the Preparation of the Speech-Language Pathologist

Focus 1: Focus on Interprofessional Education and Practice

Envisioned Future:

In accordance with our program mission and the mission of the University, our graduates will be able to demonstrate an appreciation of the collaboration that exists between different academic and clinical training programs as they prepare for their own certification and licensure in speech-language pathology. Depending on the job setting that they enter following graduation, there will be numerous opportunities that encourage collaboration between colleagues from different educational and clinical disciplines, including but not limited to: regular and special education, literacy, nursing, nutrition, counseling and social work, psychology, medical imaging, physical therapy and occupational therapy.

ASHA’s envisioned future statement (2025) states “An Interprofessional Education (IPE) approach to training and educating new professionals has resulted in access to a broader supply of qualified faculty to meet the teaching, scholarly research, and technological needs of academic programs as they strive to enhance the scientific base of the discipline and educate qualified speech-language pathologists and audiologists to meet consumer needs.”

Issues:

Effective remediation of speech-language, swallowing, voice, cognitive and/or communication skills in the context of real-life settings that incorporate all aspects of an individual's growth and development across domains is essential to the success of a speech-language pathologist as interprofessional team member. Students will:

  • Demonstrate the ability to effectively learn all aspects of a client's strengths and deficits to better inform them of how to deal with co-existing medical, physical, emotional, nutritional, psychological and/or educational problems often exhibited by these individuals
    • Support interprofessional learning by providing information on a client's speech, language, hearing and/or swallowing abilities to colleagues of different disciplines, to create a well-rounded understanding of the client as a whole entity and not subject to piecemeal investigation and care
  • Maintain effective communication and collaboration with all interprofessional partners in both educational and clinical quarters in order to ensure the highest quality of care for individuals across the lifespan
  • Exhibit sufficient reading and writing skills to meet curriculum and clinical standards in an interprofessional educational model
    • Provide referrals to clients/patients, families, caregivers, and significant others pertaining to areas of need that lie outside the domains of speech-language, hearing and dysphagia

Outcomes :

The program will increase the number of interprofessional events, programs, and opportunities.

The program will provide students with numerous exposures to interprofessional collaboration in the classroom and clinical/professional settings, e.g.:

  1. Engagement in SIM laboratory (nursing, nutrition, medical imaging departments)
    1. Collaborating with psychology doctoral students in aphasia center (psychology department)
    2. Hosting lectures on counseling to acquire counseling techniques (counseling department)
      1. Case presentations conducted interdepartmentally to benefit the wider student body within and outside the CSD department
      2. Interprofessional presentations at state and national conventions
        1. Collaborating with undergraduate and masters level social work students with people with aphasia and other communication disorders.

Indicators of Success:

  • Observations and performance in the classroom and in clinical settings
  • Collaborative feedback from interprofessional faculty following interprofessional events
  • Embedding of interprofessional education approaches into graduate level courses as indicated by course syllabus

Strategies to Achieve Outcome:

Over the next three years continuing through 2023, the CSD department will increase interprofessional models and opportunities through out the graduate experience both in and out of the classroom.  The CSD will increase interprofessional relationships with other departments in the University and the community to foster this model.

Specific Strategies:

  • Interprofessional education models will be embedded into courses as it pertains to each subject matter
  • Increase communication with other departments within the School of Health Professions and Nursing (SHPN), and the College of Education, Information and Technology (CEIT}
  • Increase participation in learning, interactive and /or clinical activities with students from different departments in varied clinical and/or educational experiences
  • Invite guest faculty from other departments to provide instruction in relevant interprofessional areas and promote use of CSD faculty to provide training to other programs
  • Initiate an interdepartmental course/workshop co-taught by faculty from the CSD department and other departments to facilitate understanding of interprofessional collaboration
  • Increase guest lecturers from the community to our program to further facilitate learning of roles of other disciplines as it relates to the field of speech-language pathology
  • Engage in effective questioning to activate the students' interprofessional knowledge and facilitate the appropriate evaluation of situations
  • Provide feedback including objective data, narratives or written descriptions of specific behaviors that may lead to formulating proper referral recommendations to allied professionals
  • Establish interprofessional collaborative learning through simulation and case studies/presentations and interprofessional readings, tutorials and online modules

Focus 2: Focus on Evidence-Based Practice

Envisioned Future:

In accord with our program mission and the mission of the University, our graduates will be able to demonstrate application of professional research through the integration of their knowledge of research findings evidenced in their writings, their clinical evaluations and treatment planning for individuals presenting with a variety of communication and swallowing issues across diverse ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds.

Issues:

We live in a fast-paced world where on-going advances in the fields of medicine and technology impact the expectations we have in the evaluation and treatment of communication disorders. It is important to instill a thirst for life-long learning in our students through the pursuit of open-minded inquiry, examination of theoretical constructs and substantiation of the efficacy of clinical procedures. Consequently, we have designed an integrative framework of professional training with definitive learning objectives and outcome measures. Students in the program will:

  • Provide evidenced based rationales for treatment and assessments
  • Write research papers as part of the graduate program requirement
  • Develop professional presentations for submission for publication and/or presentation at local and national conventions, consistent with students’ past accomplishments.             

Outcomes:

The program will continue to provide students with numerous opportunities to demonstrate communicative effectiveness through evidenced based practice in the classroom and clinical/professional settings, e.g.,

  1. Written critiques
  2. Rationales for treatment and assessments
  3. Research papers
  4. Professional presentations
  5. Examinations

Indicators of Success:

  • Observations and performance in the classroom and in clinical settings
    • Success in research paper writing assignments embedded in the curriculum
    • Increased student presentation and publications
    • Success of students’ job placements upon graduation

Strategies to Achieve Outcomes:

  1. Consider reorganizing the curriculum so that research methods are taught in the first year and are reinforced in coursework throughout the curriculum.
  2. To provide formative and summative assessment that will demonstrate students' abilities to:
    1. Critique professional literature
    2. Determine the level of evidence demonstrated in clinical research efficacy studies
    3. Identify prominent researchers and their areas of interest
    4. Seek answers to clinical questions in research findings

Focus 3: Promote and enhance clinical reasoning/decision-making skills                   

Envisioned Future:

Our graduate students will demonstrate clinical reasoning and decision making skills that are needed in the field of speech-language pathology to facilitate adequate assessment and intervention of individuals with various communication and swallowing disorders.  Our students will be able to integrate theory and clinical practice to better serve those individuals in their caseload.

Issues:

The development of clinical reasoning and decision-making skills is an essential component to ensure the competency of speech-language pathologists and the quality of care they provide to patients, clients and families. Academic and professional success requires the acquisition of valid scientific and clinical evidence and the ability to make appropriate decisions in clinically based situations. Student clinicians should demonstrate the ability to modify their thinking, make suitable clinical adjustments and evaluate outcomes to ensure patients and/or clients receive appropriate assessment and treatment options.

Outcomes:

Program curriculum will present students with various opportunities to increase the development of clinical reasoning/decision-making skills. Several learning methods will be presented inside the classroom, online and/or outside clinical settings to facilitate improvement of these skills.

Indicators of Success:

  • Students' satisfactory performance on formative and summative assessments including demonstrations of clinical proficiency in real and/or simulated environments.

Strategies to Achieve Outcomes:

  • Engage in effective questioning to activate the students' knowledge and facilitate the appropriate evaluation of situations
  • Provide feedback including objective data, narratives or written descriptions of specific behaviors
  • Present subjective data such as rating scales to assess students' performance and promote improvement in overall clinical skills
  • Assign readings, tutorials and online modules
    • Establish collaborative learning through simulation and case studies/presentations
    • Encourage reflective practice through use of self-evaluation tools, journals, portfolios, review of video-recorded sessions and clinical supervisor observations/evaluations

Focus 4: Promote cultural competence and a culture of inclusion

Envisioned Future: In accord with our program mission and the mission of the University, our graduate students will demonstrate an appreciation and awareness of cultural and linguistic diversity to better serve individuals with communication and swallowing disorders.

Issues:

Cultural competence is crucial for the delivery of speech-language services appropriate for clients having diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Students in the program will:

  • Exhibit understanding of how his or her own personal cultural and linguistic variables impact delivery of services to clients and their families
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the various cultural and linguistic factors presented by the individuals receiving services
    • Evidence knowledge of the cultural and linguistic variables that impact the interaction of the clients being served and their caregivers in order to effectively provide services
    • Demonstrate understanding of the characteristics (e.g., age, demographics, cultural and linguistic diversity, educational history and status, medical history and status, cognitive status, physical and sensory abilities) of the clients being provided services and how these characteristics impact service delivery

Outcomes:

The program will present students with opportunities to learn and demonstrate proficiency in working with linguistically and culturally diverse clients. Encourage students to reflect on and discuss their own cultural/ethnic backgrounds and how their background can influence their interactions with those around them

Indicators of Success:

Evidence of multicultural and bilingual emphasis in coursework and symposia; student performance on linguistically and culturally diverse learning outcomes.

Strategies to Achieve Outcomes:

  • Provide students with opportunities to work with clients from a wide variety of cultural and linguistic backgrounds in external clinical sites and our on-site clinic
  • Continue to ensure that program coursework is infused with information related to bilingualism, multiculturalism, and inclusion
  • Mandatory student participation in symposiums regarding issues related to bilingualism, multiculturalism, inclusion, and international perspectives

Focus 5: Promote knowledge of technology and instrumentation related to the field of

Speech-Language Pathology

Envisioned Future: Our graduate students will demonstrate knowledge of varied technology and instrumentation available in the field to facilitate client success during assessment and intervention

Issues: In the dynamic world of speech-language pathology technological advancement is the bedrock for its continued growth.  It is imperative that our graduate students become knowledgeable of the technology and instrumentation available to the field. 

Outcomes:

The program will continue to provide students with numerous opportunities to implement use of technology and instrumentation in the classroom and clinical/professional settings e.g.

  1. Diagnostic assessment
  2. Intervention planning and implementing
  3. Research projects

Indicators of Success:

  • Observation and performance in the classroom and in the clinical setting
  • Evidence of technology and instrumentation in coursework

Strategies to Achieve Outcomes:

  • Provide students with hands-on experience of technology and instrumentation related to the field
  • Technology and instrumentation embedded into course work as it relates to course content

Facilitate use of technology and instrumentation within the student’s in-house clinical experiences as deemed appropriate


FAQs

Does LIU Post require supplemental applications?
LIU Post does not require a supplemental application.

Does LIU Post require an essay?
The only essay required for the LIU Post application is the one requested by the CSDCAS application.

Does LIU Post require letters of recommendation?
LIU Post requires 3 letters of recommendation.  Letters of recommendation should be sent directly to CSDCAS and are accepted electronically ONLY.  The applicant must provide a valid email address when filling out the reference section. 

Does LIU Post require GRE scores?
LIU Post requires GRE scores. The code for submitting GRE scores for your LIU Post CSDCAS application is 1866.

If I’ve take the GRE in the past, can I submit those scores rather than retake the exam?
LIU Post will accept test scores within a 5-year period.

If I have taken courses at more than one university, do I need to send CSDCAS all my transcripts?
Yes, an official transcript for EVERY institution you attended must be sent to CSDCAS, even if the courses and transfer credits are listed on your primary institution’s transcript. This includes courses taken in study abroad programs, if the grades are not reflected on your primary transcript. CSDCAS will not release your application to LIU Post until they receive all official transcripts.  Advanced Placement test scores and transcripts for college courses taken during high school are not required.

If I’ve applied to LIU Post in the past, must I apply through CSDCAS for this September and must I submit all new transcripts, letters and scores?
Yes

Do you accept applications on a rolling basis?
No

Is there an additional fee for applying to LIU Post for the Speech Language Pathology program?
No, the only application fees are those charged by CSDCAS.


Does LIU Post require an interview?

Qualified candidates may be invited to interview.  A spontaneous writing sample may be required at the time of the interview.

Are there worker opportunities?

Opportunities to work within the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the Ladge Speech and Hearing Center or the departmental academic office are available and provides payment for work completed throughout the graduate program. 

Faculty

Catherine Crowley
Dr. Catherine C. Crowley is an assistant professor within the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Long Island University-Post.  Dr. Crowley has also served as an adjunct professor at Adelphi University.  She is a bilingual ASHA certified speech-language pathologist at Long Island Jewish Medical Center.  Her clinical experience is in various settings including acute and subacute facilities, private practice, homecare, and elementary schools.  Dr. Crowley specializes in adult speech, language, and swallowing disorders, with an interest in head and neck cancer.  Dr. Crowley completed her doctoral work at Adelphi University.  Her doctoral focus was on the effects of deep brain stimulation surgery on speech and language function.   Her current research project is investigating the relationship between stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with head and neck cancer and dysphagia.  Additionally, she is currently investigating risk factors associated with Dysphagia in the setting of COVID-19.  Dr. Crowley maintains membership in the American Speech Language Hearing Association (ASHA), Dysphagia Research Society, and the New York Neuropsychology Group (NYNG).  Dr. Crowley has presented on topics including head and neck cancer and deep brain stimulation surgery.

Nassima Abdelli-Beruh 
Dr. Nassima Abdelli-Beruh is a speech scientist with a background in experimental and cognitive psychology. She has earned a Ph.D. in speech and hearing sciences from The Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY). She acquired a comprehensive background in psychology and neurophysiology at the University of Paris-X and Paris VI in France. She was an assistant professor at NYU for four years before joining the Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders at the C.W. Post Campus in September 2006. Since earning her Ph.D. in 2002, she has developed three research tracks: the first focuses on the production of the voicing contrast by Parisian French; the second is centered on the acoustic underpinnings of the rule of regressive voicing assimilation in French stops, with the aim to explore the phonology-phonetic interface; and the third explores the relationship between language and speech through a series of studies on the acoustic cues to the production and perception of idioms in Parisian French and American English.

John Amato
John Amato Jr. is a speech-language pathologist with clinical and research experience in the areas of neurogenic-based communication and swallowing disorders in infants, children and adults. Areas of research have included oral motor and oral feeding disorders in preschool children with autism, language and play in preschool children with autism, language and socialization in children with Asperger Syndrome, syndrome identification in children with hypernasal speech disorders, swallowing disorders in Parkinson's disease, the use of sEMG in assessment and treatment of swallowing disorders, and the use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in treatment of swallowing disorders in patients with head and neck cancer.

Robert Domingo
Dr. Robert Domingo, a past president of the Long Island Speech-Language-Hearing Association (LISHA) and past member of the Board of Directors for the New York State Speech-Language-Hearing Association (NYSSLHA) as Universities and Labs representative, is a certified and licensed speech-language pathologist. He teaches courses at both the undergraduate and graduate University levels. His clinical background includes expertise in adult language habilitation and rehabilitation, motor speech disorders, neuroanatomy, autism and developmental disabilities, swallowing disorders, and alternative and augmentative communication; as well as pediatric language acquisition, phonology and articulation, and school-based language intervention.   His current interest lies in the facilitation and development of social communication skills in individuals with ASD or other communication deficits, through the use of improvisation.

Lori Newman
Lori M. Newman is a certified and licensed speech-language pathologist who serves as the Assistant Clinic Director of the Ladge Speech and Hearing Center, as well as an Assistant Professor within the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at LIU Post. Her clinical background is in pediatrics with specialty areas in autism spectrum disorder and early childhood development.

Gabriella Reynolds
Gabriella Reynolds, PhD., CCC-SLP is a certified speech language pathologist who specializes in early literacy, dyslexia, and varying levels of hearing loss. She received her Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina where she focused on children with minimal hearing loss and early literacy skills of preschool children with hearing loss. She completed her undergraduate work in linguistics and received a Master’s degree from Gallaudet, a Deaf university. Before returning to academia to pursue a PhD, she worked for several years as a speech-language pathologist at a school for children with learning disabilities. Gabriella’s academic and clinical background give her a unique insight into the difficulties of these populations. Her current work focuses on academic skills in children with mild-moderate hearing loss, development of conversational and social skills in children with hearing loss, and comparing skills targeted in a virtual versus in person phonological awareness intervention.

ADJUNCT FACULTY

Natalie Anatol
Kristin Hennessy
Theresa Blumenthal
Jan Downey
Terry Gozdziewski
Joseph Hoffman
Loren Kuppelmeyer
Tanya Linzalone
Karen MacLennan
Linda Orgel
Joanne Quinoa
Mindy Schnell
Steffi Schopick
Nicole Westphal

Ladge Speech and Hearing Center

Students observe and participate in clinical sessions with real clients at the Jerrold Mark Ladge Speech and Hearing Center, located on campus. The Ladge Speech and Hearing Center offers a full range of diagnostic and therapeutic services for children and adults individually and/or in small groups.

EXPLORE


Accreditation and Student Outcome Data

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Scholarship Opportunities

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CONTACT

School of Health Professions and Nursing
Dr. Denise Walsh, Dean
Life Science, Room 154
post-shpn@liu.edu