Nutrition

MS/RDN Professional Program


The Master of Science and Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Professional Program (MS/RDN Professional Program) is an Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) graduate-program that prepares students to sit for the Registration Examination for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDN Exam), administered by the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) (https://www.cdrnet.org/certifications/registered-dietitian-rd-certification).

The MS/RDN Professional Program is a 38-credit, 1.33 years (16-month) graduate program that is offered over four consecutive semesters (Fall I, Spring I, Summer I, Fall II) that includes graduate courses and experiential learning experiences throughout the entirety of the program. The MS/RDN Professional Program is competency-based and not dependent on hours, except to fulfill the requirements set forth by New York State (1000 hours). Through coursework and supervised clinical experiences, students are equipped with the skills and knowledge to serve communities through the promotion of optimal nutrition, health and well-being. The need for dietetics practitioners is expected to increase as the health care community places a greater emphasis on the benefits of healthy eating, disease prevention and medical nutrition therapy. Upon successful completion of the MS/RDN Professional Program, students will receive a Master of Science degree and students are eligible to sit for the RDN Exam. Upon passing the RDN Exam, a student will become a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN).


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Graduates can also obtain New York State (NYS) certification as a Certified Dietitian-Nutritionist (CDN) by completing an application and submitting the required fee. An exam is not required for the CDN if the RDN has already been earned. Information on the CDN application process is available at http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/diet/dietlic.htm.

For information on regulation of state licensure for the profession of dietetics, visit the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ (Academy) Licensure and Professional Regulation of Dietitians page at https://www.eatrightpro.org/advocacy/licensure/professional-regulation-of-dietitians.

 


How to become a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
  1. Complete a baccalaureate degree from a college or university.
  2. Complete an ACEND accredited Didactic Program in Dietetics and obtain a DPD Verification Statement or complete program specific prerequisites. 
  3. Apply to an ACEND accredited supervised practice program such as a Dietetic Internship (DI) or a Future Graduate Model program.
  4. After completion of an ACEND accredited program, the candidate successfully completes the national credentialing examination for Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN).

To learn more about how to become a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist contact the Commission on Dietetic Registration of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (A.N.D.).


Admissions Requirements

  • LIU Graduate application
  • Current resume or Curriculum Vitae
  • Minimum GPA requirement is 3.0 overall
  • Two letters of recommendation (at least one science course faculty member)
  • The GRE is not required
  • Official transcripts from all post-secondary institutions
  • Personal statement (up to 750 words) with short- and long-term career goals
  • Candidates for admission will be scheduled for an interview
  • B.S. degree from a regionally accredited U.S. college or university
  • Didactic Program in Dietetics verification statement, transcripts demonstrating completion of prerequisites or declaration of intent for completion of prerequisites

    • Nutrition prerequisites should be completed through an ACEND accredited program

      • The equivalent of Introduction to Nutrition Concepts (LIU: NTR100) must be completed by application deadline

    • Individuals who complete nutrition prerequisites from a non-accredited program will be required to take a nutrition competency exam prior to acceptance to the program

      • Nutrition competency exams will be held in person only on the LIU Post campus

      • Applicant must achieve an 80% or higher on the nutrition competency exam

International students whom English is a second language must submit official score results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The required minimum acceptable TOEFL score is: 79 Internet-based (213 computer-based or 550 paper-based) or minimum IELTS score: 6.5. International applicants to the graduate program must include an original World Education Services (WES) evaluation with their application.

Pre-requisite Courses

Science Prerequisites

5 Year Recency Required

General Chemistry with lab*

At least 4 credits

 

Organic Chemistry with lab *

At least 4 credits

 

Biochemistry with lab*

At least 4 credits

Microbiology with lab*

At least 4 credits

 

Anatomy and Physiology, I and II with labs**

At least 8 credits

Nutrition Prerequisites***

 

Nutrition Metabolism**

3 credits

Introduction to Nutrition Concepts or equivalent**

3 credits

Food Science or equivalent**

At least 3 credits

Research Methods or equivalent**

At least 3 credits

*Students will need to have achieved a grade of C or better in these prerequisite courses.

**Students will need to have achieved a grade of B or better in these prerequisite courses.

***Nutrition prerequisites to be completed at an ACEND accredited program; if completed at non ACEND accredited program, applicant must obtain an 80% or higher on nutrition competency exam

Course Sequence

MS/RDN Professional Program Academic Calendar (38 credits)

 

Semester

Course

Title

Credits

Fall I

 

12 credits

NTR611

Orientation

1

 

NTR627

Food Service

2

 

NTR628

Medical Nutrition Therapy I

3

 

NTR703

Research Methods

3

 

NTR633

Clerkship I

3

Spring

 

12 credits

NTR630

Advanced Nutrition

3

 

NTR629

Medical Nutrition Therapy II

3

 

NTR634

Clerkship II

3

 

NTR626

Advanced Counseling Skills

3

Summer

 

5 credits

NTR631

Leadership

2

 

NTR632

Public Health Nutrition

3

Fall II

 

9 credits

NTR706

Research Project

3

 

NTR604

Nutrition in the Lifecyle

3

 

NTR635

Clerkship III

3

Accreditation

The program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics
120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2190
Chicago, IL 60606-6995
Phone: 1-800-877-1600 extension 5400
Website: eatright.org/ACEND

Mission Statement

The mission of the Master of Science and Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (MS/RDN) Professional Program is to prepare students to become Registered Dietitian Nutritionists who can apply advanced knowledge and skills from both didactic and supervised experiential learning experiences into entry-level practice. Students will be prepared to contribute to professional practice and leadership in various settings, and so they can participate in lifelong learning. The MS/RDN Professional Program has been planned by the Nutrition Faculty to be in accord with the mission and goals of its organization and the standards set forth by ACEND, and the Standards of Professional Performance of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.  The MS/RDN Professional Program emphasizes competency-based learning with the integration of didactic and supervised experiential learning experiences to prepare students to become Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs).

Courses

Fall I:

NTR611: Orientation is a 1-credit course which will include: a review of policies and procedures, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Standards of Professional Performance, Scope of Dietetics Practice Framework, and the Code of Ethics; workshops to practice medical terminology, the Nutrition Care Process (NCP) using case scenarios, menu planning, creating educational materials, creating lesson plans and conducting presentations, patient privacy and confidentiality, ADIMEs, PMRs and patient interviews using our Simulation Center. 

 

NTR627: Food Service is a 2-credit course that will cover the principles of food service management including a review of historical food service industry, the systems theory of management, menu planning, and the operational functions of foodservice management. Fundamentals of food safety and sanitation will be covered in depth using ServeSafe® Manager training. This course will aid in preparing students for the RDN exam by reviewing key areas of Domains III and IV.

 

NTR628: MNT I is a 3-credit course that will cover the pathophysiology and medical nutrition therapy for specific disorders and diseases. In this initial semester, the cause, prevention and treatment of certain medical conditions such as liver disease, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease will be examined. Nutritional assessment techniques will be reviewed to evaluate dietary, biochemical, and anthropometric changes that relate to nutrition and disease processes. Case studies will be incorporated into the course to develop clinical practice skills and SEL experiences will allow for continuous assessment and reflection on skills and competencies. Theories and concepts will be applied through a variety of methods such as nutrition assessment, care plans, chart notes, and case studies. Practical applications of tools and techniques including Nutrition Focused Physical Exams (NFPE) used for assessment and management of nutritional status will be covered including practice with an Electronic Health Record.

 

NTR703: Research Methods is a 3-credit course that will provide the students with practical tools for the initiation and development of a research proposal. The scientific approach to problem solving, data collection and analysis will be reviewed at length to prepare students for their research project later in the program. The skills acquired in this course will allow students to participate in research as a RDN in the future.

 

NTR633: Clerkship I is a 3-credit course that serves as an introduction to the various roles of the RDN. The students will spend at least 220 hours on site in various areas of practice including, Institutional Food Service (IFS) establishments, School Food Service (SFS) establishments, Long Term Care (LTC) centers and other community (CA) settings. The students will be continuously assessed by their preceptors as well as the PD, AD and/or CC throughout their time within each of the practice setting areas. Assessments will include the evaluation of student work in the areas of food demonstrations, in-services, nutritional assessments, menu planning/development, etc.

 

Spring I:

NT630: Advanced Nutrition is a 3-credit course that will focus on the macronutrients: carbohydrate, fat, and protein and the interrelationships of these nutrients in human metabolism. The course will also include a detailed discussion of the role of vitamins and minerals in human metabolism and health. A review of recently published research will be included throughout this course including the evolving field of nutrigenomics.


NTR629: MNT II is a 3-credit course that follows MNT I and continues to address covering the pathophysiology and MNT for specific disorders and diseases. Clinical skills related to interpreting laboratory values and planning enteral and parenteral nutrition therapy will be addressed. Case studies and SEL will be incorporated throughout the semester to further develop, assess and reflect on the student’s clinical practice skills. Theories and concepts will be applied through a variety of methods such as nutrition assessment, including NFPE, care plans, chart notes, and case studies. Practical applications of tools and techniques used for assessment and management of nutritional status will be covered.

 

NTR634: Clerkship II is a 3-credit course that is a continuation from Clerkship I and allows students to spend time with RDNs in various professional roles. The students will spend at least 220 hours on site in various areas of practice including a hospital, renal dialysis center, IFS/SFS establishments, LTC centers and other CA settings. The students will be continuously assessed by their preceptors as well as the PD, AD and/or CC throughout their time spent within each of the practice setting areas. Assessments will include food demonstrations, in-services, nutrition assessments, menu planning/development, etc. Clerkship II allows for advancement of clinical and practice skills by the students as they advance through designated competencies. These practice setting experiences will allow the students to perform and demonstrate competencies at a more advanced level compared to Clerkship I. Clerkship II will encourage more independence within the practice settings and more opportunities for students to obtain feedback from their preceptors as well as the PD, AD and/or CC.

 

NTR 626: Advanced Counseling Skills is a 3-credit course that will provide the student with a conceptual basis for patient/client-centered nutrition counseling.  The focus is on developing non-verbal and verbal skills to engage the patient in an effective problem-solving process.  Skill-building practice sessions will include discussion, case presentations, simulated learning and self-evaluation. This course is offered in the first semester of LIU Post’s MS/RDN Professional Program so the students can utilize the foundational skills obtained in class throughout their didactic courses, SEL, counseling patients/clients, and communicating with interdisciplinary team members in their supervised practice settings throughout the program. 

 

Summer I:

NTR631: Leadership is a 3-credit course that will focus on the application of the principles of leadership and management in various professional settings (acute and long-term care, ambulatory care), consultant services and the development of approaches to leadership, debate and disagreement in the practice setting, practice management, negotiation and ethical decision making. These topics will be addressed through debates, simulation, and roleplaying. Course topics will include management ethics, standards of practice, strategic planning, financial and human management, quality improvement, leadership styles, negotiation and team work.



NTR632: Public Health Nutrition is a 3-credit course that will focus on current and emerging issues in public health nutrition to address interventions aimed at improvement in populations of diverse cultures and nutrition policy. Course topics will include an overview of global and US public health nutrition goals, malnutrition, nutrient deficiencies and obesity around the globe. Throughout the course, nutrition surveillance systems, practices and processes of local and global food markets, global food systems and legislative will be explored. An experimental component in global and public health at the local or global level will be included.  

 

Fall II:

NTR 706: Research Project is a 3-credit course that allows for the successful completion of the MS degree through the completion of a systematic review. Students in this course will transition their proposal from NTR703 to their final research project. Each student will have their own faculty mentor and reader throughout the process for continued feedback and assessments. 

 

NTR604: Nutrition in the Lifecycle is a 3-credit course that will focus on the nutritional requirements during the various stages of the human life cycle, particularly as related to growth, development and aging. The psychosocial aspects of food intake will be explored as well throughout this course. Current understanding of special needs, developmental characteristics and risks or issues common to various age groups will also be examined.

 

       NTR635: Clerkship III is a 3-credit course that is a continuation from Clerkship II that allows students to spend time working in more advanced clinical practice settings. The students will spend at least 220 hours on site in various areas of practice including a hospital, renal dialysis center or other CA settings. The students will continuously be assessed by their preceptors as well as the PD, AD and/or CC through various assessment tools, as well as incorporate self-reflection throughout their time spent within each of the practice setting areas. Clerkship III allows for advancement of clinical and practice skills by the students as they advance through designated competencies. The students will also perform staff relief during Clerkship III. These practice setting experiences will allow the students to perform and demonstrate competencies at a more advanced level compared to Clerkships I and II. Clerkship III will encourage independent and entry level practice skills within the practice settings and more opportunities for students to obtain feedback from their preceptors and clinical instructors.

Program Goals and Objectives

Program Goals and Objectives

Goal 1: Program graduates will become competent Registered Dietitian Nutritionists and meet the requirements for entry-level dietetics practice.

The program goal will be evaluated by:

 

Program Completion

Expected outcome: At least 80% of program graduates complete program/degree requirements within 2 years (150% of program length).

Graduate Employment

Expected outcome: Of graduates who seek employment, 80% are employed in nutrition and dietetics or related fields within 12 months of graduation.

Graduate Performance on Registration Exam

Expected outcome: Ninety percent of program graduates will take the CDR credentialing exam for dietitian nutritionists within 12 months of program completion.

Expected outcome The program’s one-year pass rate (graduates who pass the registration exam within one year of first attempt) on the CDR credentialing exam for dietitian nutritionists is at least 80%

Employer Satisfaction

Expected outcome: Ninety percent of graduates who respond to an alumni survey will state they were somewhat or well-prepared for an entry-level dietetics position

Goal 2: To produce Registered Dietitian Nutritionists who will have the necessary skills to contribute to professional practice and leadership in various settings, and who participate in lifelong learning.

The program goal will be evaluated by:

 

Employer Satisfaction

Expected outcome: Ninety percent of employers will state that graduates meet expectations for preparation of entry-level dietitian positions and job performance who respond to our employer survey.

Alumni Surveys

Expected outcome: Twenty-five percent of graduates who respond to an alumni survey will be involved in professional organizations, have enrolled in an advanced degree program, obtained an advanced specialized certification or worked as a preceptor.


CONTACT

School of Health Professions and Nursing
Dr. Denise Walsh, Dean
Life Science, Room 154
post-shpn@liu.edu