Nursing

M.S. in Family Nurse Practitioner


LIU Post offers the Master of Science in Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). The 46-credit program is designed to be completed in seven semesters (fall, spring, and summer) of part-time study. Graduates of the FNP program are eligible for a New York State licensure as a family nurse practitioner and will be eligible for national board certification through the national certifying agencies for advanced practice nursing (American Nurses Credentialing Center, American Academy of Nurse Practitioners).

Family nurse practitioners diagnose, treat, and prescribe for conditions affecting the pediatric, women’s health (gynecological), and adult/gerontology populations.  In New York State, nurse practitioners are autonomous (working in collaboration with a physician, but not supervised by same) and the FNP program at LIU Post is committed to preparing students to this autonomous role. The FNP program also serves to increase the opportunity for nurses to obtain advanced practice preparation as well as serve to increase the number of nurse practitioners available to deliver primary and tertiary care as well as health promotion, education, counseling, and disease prevention so patients can make healthy choices.  Candidates will complete course work and a minimum of 540 precepted hours of clinical practice in primary health care settings.

The baccalaureate degree programs in nursing and master's degree program in nursing at LIU Post are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, 655 K Street, NW, Suite 750, Washington DC 20001, (202)887-6791.

Learning Environment

The faculty promotes a learning environment that encourages individual exploration and fosters critical thinking, decision making and professional growth. Classes differ in their approach depending on course content. The information is presented in both lecture and seminar format. The faculty participate in the educational process as role models, facilitators and mentors.

Download Graduate Student Handbook

Nursing Faculty


Program Requirements

Course #

Course Name  

Credits

REQUIRED FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER COURSES
(ALL OF THE FOLLOWING- this is a LOCK STEP PROGRAM)

NUR 501

Issues in Professional Nursing for Advanced Practice Nurses and Nurse Educators

3

NUR 604

Advanced Clinical Pathophysiology Across the Lifespan

3

NUR 615

Advanced Pharmacokinetics & Pharmacotherapeutics

3

NUR 606

Advanced Health Assessment Across the Lifespan

4

NUR 760

Evidence-Based and Translational Methods

3

NUR 621

Family Theory: Cultural, Social, Ethical and Policy

3

NUR 770

Diagnostic & Clinical Reasoning (25 lab hours)

4

NUR 775

Diagnostic & Clinical Reasoning Practicum ( 90 hours)

2

NUR 660

Diagnostic & Management I: Adult-Geriatric Health

3

NUR 665

FNP Practicum I: Primary Care of Families (Adult-Geriatric Health) (180 hours)

4

NUR 670

Diagnosis & Management II: Pediatric & Women’s Health

3

NUR 675

FNP Practicum II: Primary Care of Families

(Pediatric & Women’s Health) (180 hours)

4

NUR 780

Diagnosis & Management III: Management of Chronic Complex Medical Conditions Across the Lifespan

3

NUR 785

FNP Practicum III: Management of Chronic Complex Medical Conditions Across the Lifespan (180 hours)

4


Credit and GPA Requirements

Minimum Total Credits:  46

Minimum Major GPA: 3.00

Program Admission

Applicants to the M.S. in Family Nurse Practitioner must meet the following requirements for admission.

  • Application for Admission.
  • Application fee: $50 (non-refundable)
  • Possess a current New York State Registered Nurse license
  • One year preferred with recent experience in a clinical area requiring acute care skills, i.e., family medicine or internal medicine office, community clinics, home care, hospital setting (med/surg or specialty floor) or specialty office practice.
  • Official copies of your undergraduate and/or graduate transcripts from any college(s) or universities you have attended.
  • Bachelor degree in Nursing required.
  • A personal interview with the Director of the Family NP Program or their designate.
  • The three undergraduate mandatory courses, Health Assessment, Research, and Statistics must have at least a minimum grade of B to be considered. Otherwise eligible applicants may be offered an opportunity to take these courses prior to or during the first semester of the FNP program as a limited matriculant on a probationary status.
  • A minimum of two letters of reference are required. These reference letters must be from an Adult or Family NP, MD, or DO. Reference letters need to be written on letterhead indicating phone and fax numbers and the letter needs to be signed by the individual providing the reference. The recommendation must speak to the applicants clinical acumen as an RN. They must be current and dated. Letters from other individuals will be accepted, but they will not fulfill the requirement if the applicant does not have two letters from professional listed above. 
  • Personal Statement that addresses the reason you are interested in pursuing graduate work as a Family Nurse Practitioner.
  • Each applicant will provide a copy of their current resume or CV prior to their interview.
  • A minimum overall GPA of 3.0, although candidates with lower GPA’s may be considered based on overall criteria and may be offered admission with limited matriculation on a probationary status.
  • International students are also required to achieve a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 85 Internet-based (a minimum listening score of 22 is also required); 225 Computer-based; or 563 Paper-based. IELTS of 7.5 or above is also acceptable.

Courses


NUR 501 Issues in Professional Nursing for Advanced Practice Nurses and Nurse Educators
This course addresses the current professional and legal issues that influence advanced nursing practice, nursing education and the health care delivery system. Health care policy, changes in the economics of health care, and their impact on nursing will be considered.
Credits 3
Fall & Spring

NUR 600P Practicum
Students who meet any of the following criteria will need to register for NUR 600P. Fee is equivalent to one credit per 100 practicum hours. 1) Students who require additional time beyond the academic semester to achieve the total required practicum hours. 2) Students who have a two semester lapse in time between any of the practicum graduate courses. 3) Students who are considered by faculty to be unsatisfactory. 4) Post Master's FNP Certificate Program students.
Credits: 0
Fall & Spring

NUR 604 Advanced Clinical Pathophysiology Across the Lifespan
The pathophysiology underlying diseases is studied to enable the student to form a basis for clinical judgment and diagnosis. The key principles and facts underlying present knowledge of tissue and organ systems, their specialized function and interrelationships will be studied.
Credits: 3
 Fall & Spring

NUR 606 Advanced Health Assessment Across the Lifespan
The student will build upon basic physical assessment skills in this course. Comprehensive physical examination of the client as well as psychosocial, spiritual developmental, occupational and cultural aspects of health assessment are studied in depth, in order to develop an evidence[1]based comprehensive health assessment and plan of care for clients, which includes the selection and interpretation of appropriate laboratory and other diagnostic tests. The promotion and maintenance of health management in the care of the client will be emphasized. Concurrently, students will complete a laboratory practicum where theoretical content will be integrated into the students' experience. A case study approach will be utilized.
Credits: 4
Spring & Fall

NUR 606L Advanced Health Assessment Practicum (90 hours)
The laboratory practicum is designed to be taken concurrently with Advanced Health Assessment. The practicum experience provides the opportunity for advanced practice nursing students to integrate theoretical content into the clinical experience. Emphasis is placed on developing an evidence[1]based comprehensive and problem-oriented health examination of the client.
Co-requisite NUR 606
Spring & Fall

NUR 615 Advanced Pharmacokinetics & Pharmacotherapeutics
The focus of this course is to prepare Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) students in the role of independent prescriber of pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical treatments for the myriad of illnesses and diseases found in the primary care environment. To this end, FNP students will be provided with:
• The principles of clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacotherapeutics
 • The scientific and practical basis of appropriate drug therapies
• Practical information on the clinical pharmacology of major drug classes and their use in the primary care environment
• The therapeutic objectives, strategies and evidence-based guidelines for managing both acute and chronic medical illnesses found in primary care
• The foundation to critically evaluate and effectively use pharmaceuticals from current evidence-based clinical pharmacology and therapeutics sources
Credits: 3
Fall & Spring


 NUR 621 Family Theory: Cultural, Social, Ethical and Policy Issues
Through the exploration of family theory and the examination of cultural, social, ethical, legal, and family policy issues which impact upon the family, the student will develop a comprehensive view of issues which need to be considered in the delivery of quality health care to families.
Credits: 3
 Annually

NUR 660 Diagnosis and Management I: Adult-Geriatric Health
This is the first of three diagnosis and management courses that builds on the previous core courses providing the student the opportunity to integrate both advanced theoretical and practical (patient centered) knowledge in order to deliver safe, evidence-based care to the adult population, which includes the geriatric population. The main focus during this semester is the continued skill development in assessment, diagnosis and management of both acute and chronic conditions in the primary care setting in adult clients across their lifespan as well as utilization of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention techniques. Critical thinking, diagnostic reasoning, and use of evidence-based protocols will be developed throughout the course.
Pre-requisite NUR 615, NUR 621
Co requisite NUR 665
Credits: 3
Spring & Summer


NUR 665 FNP Practicum I: Primary Care of Families (Adult-Geriatric Health)
This practicum is taken concurrently with Diagnosis and Management I (NUR 660). Students are assigned preceptors (a nurse practitioner or a physician) in a primary care setting for their practicum experiences in adult health medicine. Students are introduced to practice protocols and essential competencies necessary to provide safe primary health care to a diverse adult client population across their lifespan. Comprehensive health management, including a holistic client approach, health promotion, disease prevention, and evidence-based decisions, is emphasized in this practicum. (180 hours)
Co-requisite NUR 660
Credits: 4
Spring & Summer


NUR 670 Diagnosis and Management II: Pediatric & Women's Health
This course focuses on two important segments of the population – specifically women’s health and the pediatric population. In the first summer session, the assessment, diagnosis, management, and prevention strategies of common gynecologic conditions / illnesses found in women in the primary care setting will be discussed and reviewed (non-gynecologic women’s health issues will be discussed in both NUR 660 and NUR 780). In the second summer session, the diagnosis and management of common acute and chronic diseases/conditions and preventative strategies within the pediatric population will be discussed and reviewed. Each area of focus will require students to use appropriate evidence-based practice protocols. The twelve-week summer session is utilized in order to provide enough time to complete both lectures and required clinical hours.
Pre-requisite NUR 660
Co-requisite NUR 675
Credits: 3
Summer & Fall

 NUR 675 FNP Practicum II: Primary Care of Families (Pediatrics & Women's Health)
 This practicum is taken concurrently with Diagnosis and Management II (NUR 670). Students are assigned preceptors (a nurse practitioner or a physician) in both pediatric and women's health primary care office settings for their practicum experiences in pediatric and women's health medicine. Students are introduced to practice protocols and essential competencies necessary to provide safe primary health care to both pediatric and gynecology clients. Comprehensive health management, including a holistic client approach, health promotion, disease prevention, and evidence[1]based decisions, is emphasized in this practicum. The twelve-week summer session is utilized in order to provide enough time to complete both lectures and required clinical hours. (180 hours)
Credits: 4
Summer & Fall


NUR 760 Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Training
The emphasis for this course is on the elements of evidence-based practice. Focus is placed on the cyclical process of identifying clinical questions, searching and appraising the evidence for potential solutions/innovations, planning and implementing practice changes, evaluating the outcomes, and identifying additional gaps in knowledge. Integration of existing evidence with clinical judgement, patient preferences, inter-professional perspectives, and other resources forms the basis for the clinical decision-making process that is inherent in improving patient, population, and organizational outcomes. Processes for leading/managing practice changes are explored.
Pre-requisite NUR 501, NUR 604
Credits: 3
Summer


 NUR 770 Diagnostic and Clinical Reasoning
This course is taken prior to students entering the three Diagnosis and Management didactic courses and practicum courses. During the course, students will integrate what has been learned in the previous courses of advanced pathophysiology, pharmacology and health assessment with the clinical skills and critical understanding required to provide competent care within the primary care clinical setting (adults, pediatrics, women’s health, and geriatrics) as a licensed independent health care provider. In addition, the students will prepare for the role of the NP in the following skills and learning disciplines that are imperative to master for primary care practitioners:
• Information technology and use of Electronic Medical Records
• Use of coding and procedures for billing purposes • Administrative issues in primary care, i.e., collaborating with various health care disciplines and insurance companies to provide the best care through advocating for patients
• Ordering and interpreting appropriate diagnostic tests, i.e., CXR, ECG, PFT, MRI, CT Scan, laboratory tests
 • Utilizing evidence-based national guidelines for diagnosis and management of both acute and chronic medical conditions
• Acute care interventions, i.e., suturing
• Chronic care interventions, i.e., diabetes management
 • Leadership issues, i.e., promoting nurse practitioners practice policy both locally and at the state level, advocates for improved access, quality and cost effective health care
Thus, this course provides a forum for students to start developing their critical thinking skills in diagnosing and managing diseases as well as developing strategies in understanding and utilization of the myriad of non-clinical requirements placed on nurse practitioners in the clinical setting.
Credits: 4
 Fall & Spring


NUR 775 Diagnostic and Clinical Reasoning Practicum
This practicum course is taken in conjunction with NUR 770 and prior to students entering the three Diagnosis and Management didactic courses and practicum courses. During this practicum course, students will integrate what has been learned in the previous courses of advanced pathophysiology, pharmacology and health assessment with the clinical skills and critical understanding required to provide competent care within the primary care clinical setting (adults, pediatrics, women’s health, and geriatrics) as a licensed independent health care provider. In addition, the students will prepare for the role of the NP in the following skills and learning disciplines that are imperative to master for primary care practitioners through practical experiences in:
• Information technology and use of Electronic Medical Records
 • Use of coding and procedures for billing purposes
 • Administrative issues in primary care, i.e., collaborating with various health care disciplines and insurance companies to provide the best care through advocating for patients
 • Ordering and interpreting appropriate diagnostic tests, i.e., CXR, ECG, PFT, MRI, CT Scan, laboratory tests
 • Utilizing evidence-based national guidelines for diagnosis and management of both acute and chronic medical conditions
• Acute care interventions, i.e., suturing
• Chronic care interventions, i.e., diabetes management Thus, this practicum provides a forum for students to start developing their critical thinking skills in diagnosing and managing diseases as well as developing strategies in understanding and utilization of the myriad of non-clinical requirements placed on nurse practitioners in the clinical setting. (90 hours)
Credits: 2
Fall & Spring

NUR 780 Diagnosis and Management III: Management of Chronic Complex Medical Conditions Across the Lifespan
This is the final course of the diagnosis and management courses that builds on the previous core courses and two diagnosis and management courses. This course, along with the practicum (NUR 785), focuses on clients with chronic complex medical conditions. It provides the student the opportunity to integrate both advanced theoretical and practical (patient centered) knowledge in order to deliver safe, evidence-based care and manage clients across the lifespan who have chronic complex medical conditions and who are in need of:
• Tertiary prevention strategies in addition to continued monitoring for primary and secondary prevention strategies;
 • Treatment for acute medical conditions in addition to their chronic conditions; and,
 • Treatment for new chronic conditions in addition to their current chronic conditions.
Thus, this course and practicum prepares the Family Nurse Practitioner student for independent practice as well as know when to refer patients to appropriate specialists due to the complexity of the patient’s condition(s). Critical thinking, diagnostic reasoning, and use of evidence-based protocols will continue to be developed throughout the course.
 Pre-requisite: NUR 670
Co-requisite: NUR 785
Credits: 3
 Fall & Spring

NUR 785 FNP Practicum III: Management of Chronic Complex Medical Conditions Across the Lifespan This is the final practicum course of the diagnosis and management practicum courses that builds on the previous core courses and two diagnosis and management course practicums. This practicum, along with the course (NUR 780), focuses on clients with chronic complex medical conditions. It provides the student the opportunity to integrate both advanced theoretical and practical (patient centered) knowledge in order to deliver safe, evidence-based care and manage clients across the lifespan who have chronic complex medical conditions through practical hands-on experiences in their clinical practicums. Focus will those clients who are in need of:
• Tertiary prevention strategies in addition to continued monitoring for primary and secondary prevention strategies;
• Treatment for acute medical conditions in addition to their chronic conditions; and,
• Treatment for new chronic conditions in addition to their current chronic conditions.
Thus, this practicum and course prepares the Family Nurse Practitioner student for independent practice as well as know when to refer patients to appropriate specialists due to the complexity of the patient’s condition(s). Critical thinking, diagnostic reasoning, and use of evidence-based protocols will continue to be developed throughout the course. (180 hours)
Co-requisite NUR 780
Credits: 4
Fall & Spring



IRD 7 Political Aspects of Economics
This course is an examination of the political aspects of economic institutions and processes with particular attention to the relationship of governments and markets on the domestic and international levels.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 15 Research Methods International Relations
This course will provide students with a broad overview of IRD research. Topics to be covered include: general principles of theory, and concepts; research design, variables and hypotheses, citations and reference; international news sources and polling data; primary sources and repositories for diplomatic documents; a basic understanding of regression analysis; and the ability to create a research or policy paper as well as research reports.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 31 Espionage and Intelligence
This course surveys the history and activities of American espionage and intelligence communities. Topics to be covered include tools of the trade, cryptography, spies in literature and Hollywood, celebrated real-life spies, covert military operations, foreign intelligence agencies, the evolution of the CIA, intelligence reform and congressional oversight, homeland security, and high-tech sleuthing in the 21st century.
Credits: 3
Every Fall



IRD 34 US as a World Power
A Cold War history of U.S. Foreign Policy, examining the aftermath of World War II and America¿s new role as a global superpower. Topics to be studied include new institutional apparatus in diplomacy, containment theory and policy, Cold War crises under Truman, Eisenhower¿s ¿waging peace,¿ the Vietnam War, 1970s détente, Reagan¿s diplomacy with the Soviet Union, and the Cold War¿s conclusion.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 35 History of the US Presidency
A history of the presidency, from its creation to the early twentieth century, which will cover great presidents, failures, and those in-between. Topics will include domestic and foreign policies, wars, achievements, blunders, and scandals. We will also examine presidents¿ personalities, speaking styles, and health crises.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 41 International Economics
This course examines the economic aspects of globalization. Attention is paid to international trade in goods and services, international flows of capital (through international lending and borrowing), and migration. Topics include trade theory, tariffs, and other protectionist policies, trade agreements between nations, the World Trade Organization, balance of payments, exchange rates, and the European Monetary Union.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 45 US National Security
This course evaluates the area of U.S. national security with emphasis on military and strategic problems during the Cold War and Post-Cold War eras; defense policy-making; conventional and nuclear dimensions of defense issues; and strategic interests of the United States around the world.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 46 American Foreign Policy I
This course covers the continuity and change in American foreign policy goals, strategies, and tactics from the 18th century to World War II. Particular attention is devoted to constitutional issues and the decision-making process.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 50 International Organizations
A study of the origins, role, structure and function of international institutions essential to an understanding of the global system and its attempts at organization. Possible areas of study include the United Nations, the European Union, and World Trade Organizations.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 51 International Relations
This course considers the development and characteristics of relations among states, national policy, sources of strength and weaknesses in the policies of states, actual and potential importance of areas of the world in determining the course of world events. Must be taken by all Political Science majors. This course fulfills the Power, Institutions, and Structures thematic cluster requirement in the core curriculum.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 53 International Law I
This course is a study of the concepts of sovereignty and the international community and the development of international organizations from ancient times to the creation of the United Nations.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 56 World Affairs since 1945
This course studies the impact of World War II upon the state system, the cold war and the development of bipolar international politics, the United Nations as an instrument for international order and security, the decline of the colonial system and the emergence of new states, development of the People's Republic of China and Western Europe as new power centers.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 60 Engaged Citizenship: Applications of Democracy, Service, and the Pursuit of Happiness
This course focuses on the theory and practice of democracy, service, and the pursuit of happiness towards a fulfilling and flourishing life. Topics include democracy, citizenship, current events, critical thinking, self-awareness, communication, service-learning, and the science of happiness.
Credits: 3
Every Fall



IRD 61 Modern China: Political Doctrines and Society
The influence of political thought on societal change in modern China from the late Imperial Period to the present is examined.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 62 Research Seminar - International Relations
This course will provide students with a broad overview of IRD research and current international challenges, conflicts and historial solutions. Topics to be covered include: general principles of theory, and concepts; research design, variables and hypotheses, citations and reference; statistics and statistical analysis; international news sources and polling data; primary sources and repositories for diplomatic documents; a basic understanding of regression analysis; and the ability to create a research or policy paper as well as research reports.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 64 World Leaders and Foreign Policy
This course will provide students with a broad overview of IRD research. Topics to be covered include: general principles of theory, and concepts; research design, variables and hypotheses, citations and reference; statistics and statistical analysis; international news sources and polling data; primary sources and repositories for diplomatic documents; a basic understanding of regression analysis; aThis course will provide students with an overview of world leaders and foreign policy. Topics to be covered will be a historical overview of leadership, G-7 and G-20 summits, the relations between U.S. presidents and foreign allies/adversaries, diplomatic treaties and quarrels, the memoirs of foreign leaders, the role of personal diplomacy, and definitions of power, leadership and international relations policy.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 65 Politics of the European Union
This course covers the history, institutions and selected policies of the European Union.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 66 Politics of South and Southeast Asia
This course cover political developments in South and Southeast Asia in the 20th century such as: colonialism and the nationalist revolts, new governments their problems and politics, conflicts of interest of the great powers.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 67 Politics of East Asia
This course is an examination of the political institutions and processes of China, Japan, and Korea.
Credits: 3
On Occasion



IRD 68 Politics of Western Europe
This course covers internal government structures, principles and practices of leading Western European powers.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 69 Politics of Eastern Europe
This course covers internal government structures, principles and practices of leading Eastern European powers.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 70 Politics of the Middle East
This course covers internal government structures, principles and practices of selected countries in the Middle East.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 71 Politics of Russia
his course is an analysis of the institutions, processes and theoretical foundations of government and politics from the Imperial period to the present.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 72 Politics of Africa
This course covers the internal government structures, principles and practices of selected countries in Africa.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 73 Politics of Latin America
This course covers the internal structures, principles and practices of leading Latin American countries.
Credits: 3
Not Set



IRD 91 Diplomacy and Negotiation
This course provides an introduction to the core concepts, processes, and techniques of diplomacy and negotiation. The course focuses on the role of diplomacy by individuals and governments (Track 1 diplomacy) and other types of diplomacy (Track II and III diplomacy).
Credits: 3
Annually



IRD 94 Advanced Internship
Placement with a public or private entity within the domestic or international environment provides direct experience in politics and/or law.
Credits: 3
Not Set



Mission Statement

The faculty is dedicated to preparing the student for life-long learning in order to meet the increasing demands of the expanding environment of nursing practice. The graduates of the Department of Nursing will have developed the values and competencies which include: critical thinking and evidenced-based approach to care; culturally competent care; autonomy; interprofessional communication; and decision making within a framework of professional and ethical principles that are central to the delivery of nursing care in a global environment.

Statement of Philosophy

The educational empowerment of students promotes professionalization, community service and the competence to impact the health care system. The faculty believes that graduate nursing education provides an opportunity for the student to develop advanced competencies in nursing, in areas of concentration and role function, congruent with an expanding theoretical knowledge and authority base. Graduate education increased the opportunity for nurses to obtain advanced preparation and serves to increase the number of advanced practice nurses and nurse educators that serve the community. The faculty participates in the education process as role models, facilitators, mentors, and learners.

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing program at LIU Post is an upper division program for registered nurses. Graduates of associate degree programs in nursing receive 28 transfer credits for previous nursing education and graduates of diploma schools receive 28 credits of advanced standing toward the degree. Nursing courses are taught by professors who serve as both educators and mentors. Courses are offered during the day and evening to accommodate the schedules of registered nurses, in small class settings that encourage participation and ensure individual attention. Courses in the M.S. in Nursing Education are all offered in the Blended Learning format. Many of the core courses in the family nurse practitioner program and clinical nurse specialist program are also offered in the blended format.

Faculty

Margaret Stroehlein, DNP, ANP-BC, RN 
Nursing Chairperson
Associate Professor 
Margaret.stroehlein@liu.edu 

Daniel Jacobsen, MS, NP-C 
Director, Graduate Nursing Program 
Assistant Professor 
Daniel.jacobsen@liu.edu

Kendra Hoepper, DNP, APRN, PNP-BC
Director, Undergraduate Nursing
Assistant Professor 
Kendra.hoepper@liu.edu 

Debra McWilliams, MS, RN, CHSE 
Director, Interprofessional Simulation Center
Assistant Professor 
Debra.mcwilliams@liu.edu

Maureen Cardoza, PhD, RN, CADDCT, CDP 
Associate Professor 
Maureen.cardoza@liu.edu 

Lori Knapp, PhD, RN 
Associate Professor 
Lori.knapp@liu.edu 

Jennifer Darcy, PhD, RN 
Assistant Professor 
Jennifer.darcy@liu.edu

Kimberly Kanner, MSN, RN, OCN 
Assistant Professor 
Kimberly.kanner@liu.edu 

Kathleen Eisenstein, BS, RN 
Manager, Nursing Arts and Skills Lab 
Kathleen.eisenstein@liu.edu 

Chrystyne Olivieri, DNP, FNP-BC, CDE
Assistant Professor 
Chrystyne.olivieri@liu.edu 

Peter Magri, 
MBA, MSN, RN-BC, FNP-BC
Assistant Professor
Peter.magri@liu.edu

Nathaniel Saintus, DNP, AGACNP-CC, FNP-BC
Assistant Professor 
Nathaniel.saintus@liu.edu 

Kasie Borowy 
Clinical Coordinator 
Kasie.borowy@liu.edu 

CONTACT

School of Health Professions and Nursing
Dr. Denise Walsh, Dean
Life Science, Room 154
post-shpn@liu.edu