Social Work

SCHOOL OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS AND NURSING

B.S. in Social Work


The 120-credit Bachelor of Science in Social Work will prepare you to enter the workforce, launching a career of helping people cope with life’s challenges and advocating for a just society, as well as continuing to graduate level education.  We offer liberal arts based, relationship-centered education where students form close connections with their professors and each other. The curriculum includes courses related to policy, practice, human development and social systems’ behavior, research as well as practicum-related seminars. Students learn the social work foundation of knowledge, skills and values through small class engagement with stimulating topics, role plays, case studies, videos, TED talks, close reading and reflective writing. They engage (in the Junior and Senior years) in field practice in diverse settings including schools, homeless shelters, child and family counseling centers, charitable organizations, senior citizen facilities and social service agencies. Beyond the classroom and field placement, we offer a very active student club, which provides you with opportunities for numerous exciting community service activities.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Bachelor of Science in Social Work Program at LIU Post is to prepare students, within a liberal arts perspective, to be competent professionals with the knowledge, skills and values for entry-level generalist practice.

The Bachelor of Science in Social Work program’s competencies are:

            1. Demonstrate ethical and professional behavior.

            2. Engage in diversity and difference in practice.

            3. Advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice.

            4. Engage in practice informed research and research informed practice.

            5. Engage in policy practice.

            6. Engage with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities.

            7. Assess individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

            8. Intervene with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

            9. Evaluate practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

    Check out the LIU Post Undergraduate Bulletin to learn about degree requirements, course descriptions, and more.

    Program Assessment


    Admissions Requirements

    • Freshmen must have a minimum high school average of 80 and must be ranked in the upper half of their class.
    • Transfer students must have completed more than 24 college credits. A minimum college GPA of 2.75 is required for application review. Those who completed fewer than 24 credits must also submit high school transcripts and SAT/ACT scores.
    • Students not meeting the required academic standards may be admitted with special permission of the program director.
    • Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.75 or better in the major to retain standing in the program.
    • Students must take the following Prerequisites: PSY 1; SOC 1; BIO 1 or BIO 7; ECO 10; PHL 13.
    • While completing the required core courses (liberal art requirements) and pre-requisite courses, students must also take SWK 1 & 50. Those who transfer into the program as Juniors can take the above listed courses in the Fall semester of the Junior year.
    • To be formally admitted to the field, and advance in the major, students are required to go through an academic performance review process at the end of the fall semester of the Junior year.  This process entails both an essay and an interview.  A faculty committee evaluates students’ academic and behavioral readiness to assume the important responsibility of field work. Field admission is conditioned upon:  completion of all prerequisites and completion of the following SWK courses (SWK 1, SWK 50, SWK 60, SWK 70, and SWK 79); a GPA of 2.75 in Social Work courses; and a 2.5 overall GPA.

    SUBMITTING AN APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

    All applicants can apply for admission to LIU Post at My LIU or by using the Apply Now button in the upper right-hand corner of this page. For more information on the application process, visit the Admissions Office home page.

    Course Description

    SWK 1 Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare

    This course presents Social Work as a helping profession that has a unique combination of values, knowledge and skills with the purpose of improving the well-being of people and creating a more just society. Students are introduced to the various fields of practice where social workers address client needs and social problems. The course offers discussions of current events from the multiple perspectives of social work and case studies of social workers serving individuals, families, groups, communities and organizations. There are also guest presentations of professionals who are engaged in activities such as combating hunger, assuring equal access to mental health services and assisting those involved in domestic violence. The course aids students in determining whether social work is a possible career choice for them.
    Offered every semester, 3 credits

    SWK 18 Research Methods
    HPA 18 Research Methods

    This course provides an overview of the scientific method as it applies to social work. In this writing intensive course students learn to read and interpret quantitative and qualitative research reports and to design sound and ethical research to increase the profession’s knowledge base with respect to human behavior and service development and delivery. Students learn to use research to guide their professional practice and to employ research methodology to evaluate their individual and their program’s effectiveness.
    Spring Semester (Prerequisite: Junior Status), 3 credits

    SWK 19 Statistics
    HPA 19 Statistics

    Statistical procedures, research design, sampling techniques, descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, dispersion, correlation, regression, tests of significance and reliability are all discussed as they apply to the specific needs of the health and human services.
    Fall Semester (Prerequisite: HPA/SWK 18), 3 credits

    SWK 30 Interdisciplinary Helping Professions

    The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the partnerships in mental health and human services between Social Work and other helping professions such as Psychology, Speech Therapy, Recreational Therapy, Occupations Therapy, Physical Therapy, Art Therapy, Movement Therapy and Nutrition. Practitioners from other disciplines will present an overview of their function with emphasis on working within the interdisciplinary team.
    Elective course
    Spring Semester (Open to Juniors or Seniors), 3 credits

    SWK 31 Child & Family Service: The Practice

    This course will provide students with an overview of the Child & Family Welfare system focusing on current practices. Students will be exposed to a variety of child and family welfare topics to include but not limited to child protection, foster care, adoption, prevention, family violence and the Court's role. The course will be taught from a generalist perspective examining how policy shapes practice. Students may be asked to critique current child and family welfare policies sharing their thoughts and opinions. The course is expected to prepare students for internships and employment in the field of child and family welfare by educating them on the complex issues surrounding children and families. It will involve guest lecturers with expertise on different aspects of child welfare.
    Elective course
    Fall Semester, 3 credits

    SWK 50 Social Welfare Programs & Policies I

    SWK 50 provides information about the development of social work as a profession including its tradition of advocacy, reform and commitment to policies inherent in the values of the profession. Students will gain an understanding of historical and contemporary social welfare services and examine how economic, political, and organizational systems influence social policies and diverse and at-risk populations. This course also provides students with knowledge of distinct social issues, and social service programs. It challenges students to interpret basic characteristics of social programs and policies in order to improve services for clients. Throughout the semester students explore inequitable treatment of specific groups and learn of the need for social justice to meet social needs. In addition, this course provides a basic understanding of the specific role of the social worker in policy practice.
    Spring semester (Open to Freshmen & Sophomores; prerequisite SOC 1), 3 credits

    SWK 51 Social Welfare Programs & Policies II

    SKW 51 has two major foci: a) how and under what circumstances the definition and typification of social problems trigger policy responses and b) social work’s role in analyzing, evaluating and influencing policy. Students conduct an analysis of a policy that responds to any social problem of their choosing, and then deconstruct the historical, theoretical and ideological forces shaping the policy as it affects a population at risk. The uniquely-related class, age, gender, racial and cultural issues of oppressed populations and the barriers they experience when confronting the political and organizational processes that influence policy development are at the core of this semester’s inquiry.
    Fall Semester (Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Status), 3 credits

    SWK 60 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I

    The first in the 2-sequence course on understanding human behavior in the social environment, this course provides foundation knowledge of the multiple theoretical perspectives required for generalist social work practice. The focus is on understanding individual behavior across the life-span from conception through late childhood within the context of social systems including families, groups, organizations and communities. Biological, psychological, social and spiritual factors that affect human growth and development are examined along with problems including, child abuse/neglect, oppression, marital conflicts, mental illness, developmental disabilities, addictions and deviant behaviors. Special attention is given to social and economic justice and diversity variables including gender, ethnicity, culture and class as related to individuals’ ability to reach or maintain optimal health and well-being. Case material is introduced throughout the course to illustrate theoretical concepts.
    Fall Only (Prerequisite: Junior Status; Soc 1, Bio 1 or 7, PSY 1, 2, SWK 1, 50 - Junior transfers can take as co-requisites), 3 credits

    SWK 61 Human Behavior in the Social Environment II

    This writing intensive course is the second in the human development sequence and covers the understanding of individual behavior from adolescence through late adulthood within the context of social systems including families, groups, organizations and communities (SWK 60 covered infancy through pre- adolescence). Based on the theories learned in SWK 60, biological, psychological, social and spiritual factors that affect human growth and development are examined along with social problems including, substance abuse, domestic violence and elder abuse. The focus is on normal developmental challenges and growth, but the course also addresses common mental health difficulties. Special attention is given to social and economic justice and diversity variables including gender, ethnicity, culture and class as related to individuals' ability to reach or maintain optimal health and well-being. Case material is introduced throughout the course to illustrate theoretical concepts.
    Spring Semester (Prerequisite: SWK 60), 3 credits

    SWK 70 Social Work Practice I

    The first of a two-course sequence, this course is designed to provide students with the knowledge, skills and values essential for beginning generalist social work practice and entry into field placement. The course presents a generalist approach to social work practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. This course emphasizes generalist practice with individuals and organizations and the knowledge and skills applicable to intervention with these two target systems. The beginning phase of the helping process is highlighted.
    Prerequisite of SWK 1 & SWK 50 and Co-requisite of SWK 79 or Co-requisite of SWK 1, SWK 50, & SWK 79 if student is in Junior status
    Fall Semester, 3 credits

    SWK 71 Social Work Practice II

    The second of a two-course sequence, this course is designed to continue teaching the knowledge, skills and values essential for beginning generalist social work practice. Whereas the first course focused on practice with individuals and organizations, this course concentrates on practice with families, groups and communities. Social Work Practice II identifies variations in engagement, assessment and contracting with these three types of systems. All levels of intervention are discussed as they apply to practice with families, groups and communities. The middle and ending phases of the helping process are highlighted.
    Spring Semester (Prerequisite: SWK 70 and Co-requisite of SWK 80), 3 credits

    SWK 75 Diversity Sensitive Social Work Practice

    This course is designed to draw a bridge between generalist social work practice and the impact of ethnicity, social class, and minority status. Students will be provided with the tools to make ethnic sensitive social work assessments and interventions. The focus of this course will be on examining the problems that face diverse cultures and populations at risk for discrimination and oppression as they attempt to negotiate their environment and to ameliorate the stressors that they confront. Through the use of the case method model of learning, students will be presented with material that presents dilemmas faced by diverse populations as they strive to function and survive in the United States. This course makes a linkage between material on diverse cultures and the social work role and demonstrates the connection between cross-cultural values, beliefs and the profession.
    Spring semester (Prerequisite: Senior Status; SWK 71), 3 credits

    SWK 79 Introduction to Field Placement

    The purpose of this class is to orient junior level social work majors to the field practicum. The course requires one interview with the field director and at least one to two field agency interviews. SWK 79 prepares students for entry into the field practicum experience, and the concurrent Field Seminar class (SWK 80), by anticipating and responding to common concerns among entry-level students, explicating field program policies, and practically preparing the student for the agency selection and initial interviewing process. Students are introduced to and acquainted with the various roles and responsibilities of each of the field team members. In addition, the field contract, task/ assignment form, the learning contract, the process recording, the supervisory process, diversity and cultural competence issues in the field and the qualifications and challenges of developing ethical and professional behavior are explored. In preparing students for the “mechanics” of fieldwork, the seminar also takes time to validate the developmental challenges that students experience in mastering the demands of the field placement.
    Prerequisite of SWK 1 & SWK 50 and Co-requisite of SWK 70 or Co-requisite of SWK 1, SWK 50, & SWK 70 if student is in Junior status.
    Fall semester, 1 credit

    SWK 80 Field Instruction I

    Field Experience involves placement of the student in a social service agency or social work department of a larger institution. The student is required to intern for a minimum of 100 work hours during the standard Spring semester of the Junior year. The student is required to offer social work service to diverse clients or client systems under the direct, regular supervision of an agency field instructor agreed upon by the agency and the program.

    The instructional techniques in the seminar parallel processes students will be utilizing in the field as a student and as a social worker. Students’ field experiences are processed using the problem-solving process. Developmental tasks are partialized or deconstructed into manageable parts; agency analysis, the supervisory process, the formulation of learning goals, struggles with diversity and ethical dilemmas, etc. These tasks are processed through journals and assignments that require reflection on the intersection between experience, knowledge, skills, and self. In class, students are also encouraged to collectively utilize the problem-solving process to help their peers’ in the resolution of learning dilemmas. Students are also continually reinforced to prepare agendas and actively assert their own learning needs in class and in supervision.
    Spring semester (Prerequisite: SWK 79, co-requisite: SWK 71), 4 credits

    SWK 90, 91 Field Instruction II & III

    Taken during the senior year (approximately 400 hours), these two courses provide students with opportunities to test in the field setting the principles and concepts learned in the classroom. Students are assigned to social work agencies or social work programs. Students receive on site field supervision from a professional social worker and participate in individual and group faculty advisory seminars.
    Fall and Spring Semester (Prerequisite: Senior Status, SWK 80), 6 credits each

    Degree Requirements

    The Social Work Degree Program

    The Bachelor of Science Program in Social Work focuses upon the preparation of generalist social workers. Courses include field instruction that permits students to practice what they learn in the classroom at various social agencies. Students can be creative and pursue wide areas of interest. Legal agencies, student health-counseling, community service centers, youth bureaus, preschools, charitable organizations, and hospitals are among field placement sites.

    Degree Requirements

    Satisfactory completion of 120 credits in the Liberal Arts Core and Competencies, the Social Work Major (foundation, and related requirements) and Free Elective Areas is required for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Social Work.

    Curriculum

    The degree combines a strong liberal arts core with extensive foundation courses in the social work major. The following outline gives an overall perspective of the curriculum:

    Liberal Arts Requirements and First Year Seminar (Minimum of 60 credits)

    Co-related required liberal arts and science courses included in the minimum of 60 LA credits.

    Course
    Title Credits
    ECO 10
    Introduction to Microeconomics 

    PHI 13 
    Human Values 
    PSY 101 
    General Psychology 
    SOC 1
    Introduction to Sociology 
    BIO 1 or BIO 7
    Foundations of Biology 1 or Human Anatomy & Physiology I
    4

    Social Work Requirements (53 credits)

    Course
    Title Credits
    SWK 1 
    Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare 

    SWK / HPA 18 
    Research Methods
    SWK/HPA 19 
    Statistics for Administrators
    HPA 20 Computer-Based Management Systems 
    HPA 40
    Organizational Leadership
    3
    SWK 50   Social Welfare Programs and Policies I   3
    SWK 51 
    Social Welfare Programs and Policies II 
    3
    SWK 60 
    Human Behavior in the Social Environment I 
    3
    SWK 61 
    Human Behavior in the Social Environment II 
    3
    SWK 70 
    Social Work Practice I 
    3
    SWK 71 
    Social Work Practice II 
    3
    SWK 75
    Diversity-Sensitive Social Work Practice 
    3
    SWK 79 
    Introduction to Field Instruction 
    1
    SWK 80 
    Field Instruction I   4
    SWK 90   Field Instruction II   6
    SWK 91   Field Instruction III  6

    Social Work Electives (3 credits)

    Choose from the following:

    Course
    Title Credits
    Social Work Electives
    SWK 30, 385, 386, 389, 390 ; PSY 25, 26, 29, 30, 32, 63, 70, 121
    SOC 2, 3, 15, 22, 24, 33, 70 ; ANT 1, 2 ; PHI 8, 14, 19
    3 each

    Free Electives 4

    Total - 120 credits

    Plan of Study

    Lower-division Freshman and Sophomores are considered pre-professional students. For students who fulfill the necessary requirements, professional education and field placement begin in the Junior year. Students must maintain a 2.75 overall and major GPA to remain in the program. Residential students at LIU Post must be registered full-time for the final two years of the program to fulfill course and field requirements. Students, in cohorts, take their major courses in the sequence specified in the plan of study. Courses in the social work major are not offered each semester and require attendance to fulfill course requirements. In addition, field requirements include 100 hours per semester in the 2nd semester of the Junior year and 400 hours in the Senior year. Under special circumstances, and with the program director’s approval, students might take less than a full load of courses and delay the start of field placement.  Students who are not beginning their field placements cannot register for field seminars (SWK 80, 90, & 91) and cannot take practice courses, which are tied to field experience (SWK 70, 71, & 75).

    Suggested 4 Year Plan of Study in Social Work (B. S.)

    Freshman Year (28 credits)

    Fall Semester

    Course
    Title Credits
    SWK 1
    Introduction to Social Work 

    CORE
    Ethics, Self, and Society Cluster (Required: PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology I)
    ENG 1
    Freshman Composition
    CORE
    Quantitative Reasoning (Mathematics)
    FYS 1
    Freshman Year Seminar
    1
    TOTAL   13

    Spring Semester

    Course
    Title Credits
    SWK 50
    Social Welfare Programs & Policies I

    SOC 1
    Introduction to Sociology
    ENG 2
    Composition: Argument and Analysis
    CORE
    Creativity, Media, and the Arts Cluster
    SWK Elective
    See Elective List**
    3
    TOTAL  

    15

    Sophomore Year (32 credits)

    Fall Semester

    Course
    Title Credits
    SWK 51
    Social Welfare Programs & Policies II

    SWK 60
    Human Behavior in the Social Environment I           
    CORE

    Additional Course from 1 Cluster (Required: PHI 13 Human Values)

    ELECTIVE
    Free Liberal Arts Elective                                           
    CORE
    Scientific Inquiry & the Natural World Cluster
    (Required: BIO 1 Foundations in Biology I OR BIO 7, Human Anatomy & Physiology I)  
    4
    TOTAL   16 

    Spring Semester

    Course
    Title Credits
    SWK 61

    Human Behavior in the Social Environment II (WAC)*                                  


    ELECTIVE
    Free Liberal Art Elective
    4
    ELECTIVE

    Free Liberal Art Elective

    ELECTIVE
    Free Liberal Arts Elective                                           
    ELECTIVE
    Free Liberal Arts Elective                  3
    TOTAL   16 

    Junior Year (30 credits)

    Fall Semester

    Course
    Title Credits
    SWK 70

    Social Work Practice I


    SWK 79
    Introduction to Field Placement 
    1
    HPA 40

    Organizational Leadership (WAC)*

    CORE

    Power, Institution, & Structures Cluster(Required: ECO 10 Micro Economics)

    ELECTIVE
    Free Elective                  4
    TOTAL   14

    Spring Semester

    Course
    Title Credits
    SWK 71

    Social Work Practice II


    SWK 80
    Field Instruction I
    4
    SWK / HPA 18

    Research Methods (WAC)*

    CORE

    Perspectives on World Cultures Cluster (Recommended: SPANISH I)

    ELECTIVE
    Free Liberal Arts Elective                  3
    TOTAL   16

    Senior Year (30 credits)

    Fall Semester

    Course
    Title Credits
    SWK 90

    Field Instruction II

    6
    SWK 75
    Diversity Sensitive Social Work
    3
    HPA 20

    Computer-Based Management Systems

    ELECTIVE
    Free Liberal Arts Elective                  3
    TOTAL   15

    Spring Semester

    Course
    Title Credits
    SWK 91

    Field Instruction III

    6
    HPA / SWK 19
    Statistics for Administrators
    3
    ELECTIVE

    Free Liberal Arts Elective

    ELECTIVE
    Free Liberal Arts Elective                  3
    TOTAL   15

    Total: 120 Credits

    * Note: WAC indicates “Writing Across the Curriculum” (writing-intensive course).

    **Social Work Electives

    Course
    Title Credits
    PSY 25
    Developmental Psychology: Childhood

    PSY 26
    Developmental Psychology: Adolescence
    PSY 29
    Developmental Disabilities
    PSY 30
    Personality, Research & Theory
    PSY 32
    Social Psychology
    3
    PSY 63 Abnormal Psychology 3
    PSY 70  Developmental Psychology: Adulthood & Aging 3
    PSY 121 Human Growth & Developmental Across the Lifespan 3
    PHI 8* Beginning Philosophy 3
    PHI 14 Symbolic Language 3
    PHI 19 Medical Ethics 3
    SOC 2* Social Institutions 3
    SOC 3 Social Problems 3
    SOC 15 Social Changes 3
    SOC 22 Sociology of Families 3
    SOC 24 Sociology of Adolescence & Youth 3
    SOC 33 Deviant Behavior 3
    SOC 70 Sociology of Poverty 3
    SWK 30 Interdisciplinary Helping Professions (cross listed with HSC 102) 3
    SWK 385, 386, 389, 390 Honors Thesis
    ANT 1* Development of the Human Species, Culture & Society 3
    ANT 2* Human Society 3

     * Note: WAC indicates “Writing Across the Curriculum” (writing- intensive course)

    Typical Sequence

    Full-time students at LIU Brentwood and transfer students for the Junior year at LIU Post follow the two year upper-division plan of study which allows them to catch up on degree requirements. LIU Brentwood students may follow a 3-year or 4-year part-time schedule.

    Suggested 4 Year Plan of Study in Social Work (B. S.)

    Freshman Year (28 credits)

    Fall Semester

    Course
    Title Credits
    SWK 1
    Introduction to Social Work 

    PSY 1
    General Psychology I
    ENG 1 / 1S
    Freshman Composition
    MTH
    Mathematics
    COLL 101
    Freshman Orientation
    1
    TOTAL   13

    Spring Semester

    Course
    Title Credits
    SWK 50
    Social Welfare Programs & Policies I

    SOC 1
    Introduction to Sociology
    ENG 2
    Composition: Argument and Analysis
    CORE
    Creativity, Media, and the Arts Cluster
    SWK Elective
    See Elective List**
    3
    TOTAL  

    15

    Sophomore Year (32 credits)

    Fall Semester

    Course
    Title Credits
    SWK 51
    Social Welfare Programs & Policies II

    SWK 60
    Human Behavior in the Social Environment I           
    PHL 13

    Human Values

    SWK Elective
    See Elective List**
    BIO 1
    Foundations in Biology I 4
    TOTAL   16 

    Spring Semester

    Course
    Title Credits
    SWK 61

    Human Behavior in the Social Environment II (WAC)*                                  


    BIO 2
    Foundations in Biology II
    4
    ELECTIVE

    Free Liberal Art Elective

    ELECTIVE
    Free Liberal Arts Elective                                           
    ELECTIVE
    Free Liberal Arts Elective                  3
    TOTAL   16 

    Junior Year (32 credits)

    Fall Semester

    Course
    Title Credits
    SWK 70

    Social Work Practice I


    SWK 79
    Introduction to Field Placement 
    1
    HPA 40 OR POL 80

    Organizational Leadership (WAC)* OR Administrative Behavior (WAC)*

    ECO 10 OR ECO 11

    Micro Economics OR Macro Economics

    ELECTIVE
    Free Liberal Art Elective                  3
    ELECTIVE  Free Elective 3
    TOTAL   16

    Spring Semester

    Course
    Title Credits
    SWK 71

    Social Work Practice II


    SWK 80
    Field Instruction I
    4
    SWK / HPA 18

    Research Methods (WAC)*

    ELECTIVE
    Free Liberal Arts Elective                  3
      SPANISH I OR Perspectives on World Cultures 3
    TOTAL   16

    Senior Year (28 credits)

    Fall Semester

    Course
    Title Credits
    SWK 90

    Field Instruction II

    6
    SWK 75
    Diversity Sensitive Social Work
    3
    HPA 20

    Computer-Based Management Systems

    ELECTIVE
    Free Liberal Arts Elective                  3
    TOTAL   15

    Spring Semester

    Course
    Title Credits
    SWK 91

    Field Instruction III

    6
    HPA / SWK 19
    Statistics for Administrators
    3
    SWK Elective

    See Elective List**


    Free 1-3
    TOTAL   13-15

    Total: 120 to 122 Credits

    * Note: WAC indicates “Writing Across the Curriculum” (writing-intensive course).

    **Social Work Electives

    Course
    Title Credits
    PSY 25
    Developmental Psychology: Childhood

    PSY 26
    Developmental Psychology: Adolescence
    PSY 29
    Developmental Disabilities
    PSY 30
    Personality, Research & Theory
    PSY 32
    Social Psychology
    3
    PSY 63 Abnormal Psychology 3
    PSY 70  Developmental Psychology: Adulthood & Aging 3
    PHI 8* Beginning Philosophy 3
    PHI 14 Symbolic Language 3
    PHI 19 Medical Ethics 3
    SOC 2* Social Institutions 3
    SOC 15 Social Change 3
    SOC 22 Sociology of Families 3
    SOC 24 Sociology of Adolescence & Youth 3
    SOC 33 Deviant Behavior 3
    SOC 70 Sociology of Poverty 3
    SWK 30 Interdisciplinary Helping Professions (cross listed with HSC 102) 3
    SWK 31 Child and Family Services: The Practice
    ANT 1* Development of the Human Species, Culture & Society 3
    ANT 2* Human Society 3

     * Note: WAC indicates “Writing Across the Curriculum” (writing- intensive course)

    Fieldwork Requirements

    Field work is a critical part of the Social Work educational experience. The program offers intensive field experience and supervised individual and group instruction. The field education component of LIU Post’s social work program reflects and complies with the program's goals and mission to prepare students for generalist social work practice, based upon a liberal arts perspective, and through the integration of core/foundation areas. The field practicum allows the integration and ultimate assessment of the student's ability to apply the content pertaining to social work values and ethics, diversity, populations at risk and social and economic justice, human behavior and the social environment, social welfare policy and services, social work practice, and research. Attendance in weekly Field Seminar classes is required of all students. The emphasis for Juniors is on reconciling the demands of the field placement and understanding and utilizing the agency as a service provider. Seniors have more of an opportunity to focus on actual practice issues and to utilize their process recordings in class which illustrate diversity issues, values and ethical dilemmas, assessment, problem-solving, evaluation and termination processes. A research project is required in both seminar classes.

    Field Instruction Manual

    To view our Field Instruction Manual, Click here

    Health Care Focus

    Students interested in healthcare as a future field of practice can enhance their generalist social work education with a focus on the healthcare system. Those students who elect this path will be placed in a healthcare-related setting for their senior year internship and will take social work electives in connection with the Health Sciences Department.

    The two required courses are:

    HSC 101 - Introduction to Health Professions

    SWK 30/HSC 102 - Interdisciplinary Helping Professions

    Contact Social Work

    CONTACT

    School of Health Professions and Nursing
    Dr. Denise Walsh, Dean
    Life Science, Room 154
    post-shpn@liu.edu