College of Veterinary Medicine
EDUCATION

Curriculum


YEAR

Semester

Course # and Title

Credit hours

Mode of instruction

1

1

DVM-510 Veterinary Anatomy I

DVM-511 Veterinary Physiology I

DVM-512 Veterinary Histology

DVM-513 Veterinary Immunology

DVM-514 Animal Welfare and Behavior

DVM-515 Veterinary Skills lab 1

DVM-516 Integration I

Semester total

4

3

3

3

2

2

1

18

Lectures and laboratories

Lectures

Lectures and tutorials

Lectures

Lectures and laboratories

Laboratories and experential

Clinical presentations

2

DVM-520 Veterinary Anatomy II

DVM-521 Veterinary Physiology II

DVM-522 Animal Nutrition

DVM-523 Veterinary Parasitology

DVM-524 General Pathology

DVM-525 Veterinary Skills II

DVM-526 Integration II

DVM-527 Research Topics in Veterinary Medicine

Semester 2 total

4

3

3

3

2

2

1

1

19

Lectures and laboratories

Lectures

Lectures and tutorials

Lectures

Lectures and laboratories

Laboratories and experential

Clinical presentations

Tutorials

2

3

DVM-610 Systemic Pathology I

DVM-611 Introduction to Pharmacology

DVM-612 Principles of Surgery

DVM-613 Veterinary Bacteriology & Mycology

DVM-614 Veterinary Virology

DVM-615 Veterinary Skills III

DVM-616 Integration III

Semester 3 total

3

3

3

3

3

2

1

18

Lectures and laboratories

Lectures

Lectures and laboratories

Lectures

Lectures

Laboratories and experential

Clinical presentations

4

DVM-620 Systemic Pathology II

DVM-621 Clinical Pathology

DVM-622 Veterinary Epidemiology

DVM-623 Veterinary Pharmacology

DVM-624 Veterinary Toxicology

DVM-625 Public Health and Food Safety

DVM-626 Veterinary Skills IV

DVM-627 Integration IV

Semester 4 total

3

3

3

3

3

2

2

1

20

Lectures and laboratories

Lectures and laboratories

Lectures and tutorials

Lectures

Lectures

Lectures and tutorials

Laboratories and experential

Clinical presentations

3

5

DVM-710 Small Animal Medicine I

DVM-711 Small Animal Surgery

DVM-712 Anesthesia

DVM-713 Diagnostic Imaging

DVM-714 Equine Medicine

DVM-715 Veterinary Skills V

Semester 5 total

5

5

3

3

3

2

21

Lectures 

Lectures and laboratories

Lectures and laboratories

Lectures and tutorials

Lectures

Laboratories and experential

6

DVM-720 Small Animal Medicine II

DVM-721 Large Animal Medicine 

DVM-722 Exotics and Laboratory Animal Medicine

DVM-723 Large Animal Surgery

DVM-724 Theriogenology

DVM-725 Veterinary Skills VI

Semester 6 total

5

4

3

3

3

2

20

Lectures

Lectures

Lectures and tutorials

Lectures and laboratories

Lectures and laboratories

Laboratories and experential

4

7

DVM-800 Large Animal Medicine Clerkship 

DVM-801 Small Animal Medicine Clerkship

DVM-802 Small Animal Surgery Clerkship

DVM-803 Anesthesia Clerkship

DVM-804 Clinical Pathology Clerkship

Semester total

4

4

4

2

2

16

Core clerkship

Core clerkship

Core clerkship

Core clerkship

Core clerkship

8

DVM-805 Anatomic Pathology Clerkship

DVM-806 Diagnostic Imaging Clerkship

DVM-807 Emergency/ Critical Care

DVM-808-811 Elective Clerkship

DVM-808-811 Elective Clerkship

DVM-808-811 Elective Clerkship

DVM-808-811 Elective Clerkship

Semester total

2

2

2

2-3

2-3

2-3

2-3

16

Core clerkship

Core clerkship

Core clerkship

Elective clerkship

Elective clerkship

Elective clerkship

Elective clerkship

Total

148



CATALOG/ BULLETIN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Year 1. Semester 1.

DVM-510 Veterinary Anatomy I. This course studies the gross anatomy of organ systems in domestic animals with emphasis on canine anatomy. Students are expected to integrate acquired knowledge and skills with other courses taught during the semester and the DVM program. Credits 4. Every Fall.

DVM-511 Veterinary Physiology I. This course studies the function of the body at cellular levels; and will concentrate on functions of the musculoskeletal, hematopoietic, nervous, pulmonary and cardiovascular systems in mammalian and avian species. Credits 3. Every Fall.

DVM-512 Veterinary Histology. This course studies the microscopic anatomy of the musculoskeletal, nervous, cardiovascular, hematopoietic, lymphatic, respiratory, gastrointestinal, urogenital, and endocrine systems in mammalian and avian species. Students are expected to integrate knowledge and skills gained in this course to veterinary medical practice. Credits 3. Every Fall.

DVM-513 Veterinary Immunology. This course reviews molecules, cells and organs that make up the immune system and their impact on disease control, and the improvement of animal health. Credits 3. Every Fall.             

DVM-514 Animal Welfare and Behavior. This course reviews animal welfare and ethical issues commonly encountered in the practice of veterinary medicine. Animal behavior of common domestic and captive species will be discussed. Credits 2. Every Fall.

DVM-515 Veterinary Skills lab 1. This course engages students in the application and integration of knowledge acquired across the DVM program. Using deliberate practice and constant feedback the course involves development of manual dexterity, handling and restraint of common domestic animals, and improvement of communication skills. Students are also incorporated into the daily operation of partner institutions where they observe live animal procedures, progressively build professional competence, and participate in supervised case management and other activities routinely conducted in the practice of Veterinary Medicine. Credits 2. Every Fall.

DVM-516 Integration I. This course reviews select topics of first semester courses (Anatomy, Animal Behavior and Welfare, Histology, Immunology and Physiology) based on scenarios commonly seen in the practice of Veterinary Medicine. The course is designed to promote horizontal and vertical curricular integration, and to enhance students problem solving and critical thinking skills. Credits 1. Every Fall.  

Year 1. Semester 2

DVM-520 Veterinary Anatomy II. This course studies comparative gross anatomy of organs systems in domestic animals with emphasis on equine and bovine. Students are expected to integrate acquired knowledge and skills with other courses taught during the semester and will integrate this knowledge and skills with professional courses. Credits 4. Every Spring.

DVM-521 Veterinary Physiology II. This course studies the function of the body at cellular levels; it will concentrate on renal and acidā€base physiology; the gastrointestinal (regulation of carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism), endocrine and reproductive system. Credits 3. Every Spring.

DVM-522 Animal Nutrition. This course reviews the classification and functions of nutrients, basic nutrient requirements in the main domesticated species (Canine, Feline, Equine, Swine, Beef and Dairy cattle, Poultry), and exotic pets. Common clinical problems associated to nutritional imbalances are also discussed. Credits 3. Every Spring.

DVM-523 Veterinary Parasitology. This course reviews common helminth parasites (nematodes, trematodes, cestodes, acanthocephalans), protozoan and arthropod parasites commonly found in domestic species. The course will also integrate with practical courses delivered during the semester. Credits 3. Every Spring.

DVM-524 General Pathology. This course studies the basic reactions of cells and tissues to injury. Topics will include disease processes such as cell injury, cell death, growth disturbances, circulatory disturbances, inflammation, repair, and neoplasia. Credits 2.Every Spring.

DVM-525 Veterinary Skills II. This course engages students in the application and integration of knowledge acquired across the DVM program. Using deliberate practice and constant feedback the course involves development of manual dexterity, handling and restraint of common domestic animals, and improvement of communication skills. Students are also incorporated into the daily operation of partner institutions where they observe live animal procedures, progressively build professional competence, and participate in supervised case management and other activities routinely conducted in the practice of Veterinary Medicine. Credits 2. Every Spring.

DVM-526 Integration II. This course reviews selected topics of second semester courses (Anatomy, Parasitology, Pathology and Physiology) based on scenarios commonly seen in the practice of Veterinary Medicine. The course is designed to promote horizontal and vertical curricular integration, and to enhance student’s problem solving and critical thinking skills. Credits 1. Every Spring.

DVM-527 Research Topics in Veterinary Medicine. This course reviews the role of research in the advancement of veterinary knowledge. Students will conduct literature searches, critically evaluate manuscripts, review study design and approval process required to conduct research using animals, explore career opportunities in Veterinary Medicine and discuss the role of research in the Veterinary profession and its contribution to society. Credits 1. Every Spring.

Year 2- Semester 1

DVM-610 Systemic Pathology I. This course builds on the foundations acquired on General Pathology to enhance basic pathology knowledge while focusing on the pathogenesis and morphological manifestation of disease in animals. The course reviews the main diseases of the musculoskeletal, hematopoietic, cardiovascular, endocrine, integumentary, reproductive and urinary systems. Credits 3. Every Fall.

DVM-611 Introduction to Pharmacology. The course reviews the basic principles of pharmacology with emphasis on drug disposition, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and basic drug calculations. The course reviews drugs classes used in Veterinary medicine and includes classification of drugs, drug labels and prescriptions. Credits 3. Every Fall.

DVM-612 Principles of Surgery. This course provides students with basic training in preoperative planning, and surgical techniques. Students improve surgical technical skills utilizing models and cadavers and progress to performing common surgical procedures in live patients under the close supervision of faculty surgeons. Credits 3. Every Fall.

DVM-613 Veterinary Bacteriology & Mycology. This course reviews bacterial and fungal agents of infectious diseases affecting domestic and wildlife animals. Characteristics of the main bacterial and fungal including pathogenesis, morphologic changes, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment and prevention are discussed in detail. Credits 3. Every Fall.

DVM-614 Veterinary Virology. This course reviews common viral diseases affecting domestic and wild animals. Topics include virus classification, structure, chemical composition and replication of viruses, DNA and RNA virus families with emphasis on mechanisms of disease and pathogenesis, host responses, clinical signs, morphologic changes, general diagnosis, prevention and control measures of important diseases, including viral zoonosis. Credits 3. Every Fall.

DVM-615 Veterinary Skills III. This course engages students in the application and integration of knowledge acquired across the DVM program. Using deliberate practice and constant feedback the course involves development of manual dexterity, handling and restraint of common domestic animals, and improvement of communication skills. Students are also incorporated into the daily operation of partner institutions where they observe live animal procedures, progressively build professional competence, and participate in supervised case management and other activities routinely conducted in the practice of Veterinary Medicine. Credits 2. Every Fall.

DVM-616 Integration III. This course reviews selected topics of Animal Nutrition, Bacteriology, General Pathology, Principles of Surgery, Pharmacology and Virology based on selected scenarios commonly seen in the practice of Veterinary Medicine. The course is designed to promote horizontal and vertical curricular integration, and to enhance student’s problem solving and critical thinking skills. Credits 1. Every Fall.

Year 2- Semester 2

DVM-620 Systemic Pathology II. This course builds on the foundations acquired on General Pathology to enhance basic pathology knowledge while focusing on the pathogenesis and morphological manifestation of disease in animals. The course reviews the main diseases of the alimentary, respiratory and nervous system, liver, exocrine pancreas and special senses. Credits 3. Every Spring.

DVM-621 Clinical Pathology. This course reviews concepts of laboratory medicine, including use and interpretation of clinical pathology test results, the physiologic principles that underlie these tests, application of laboratory tests to diagnose and monitor common diseases of domestic species. Credits 3. Every Spring.

DVM-622 Veterinary Epidemiology. This course reviews the basic concepts and approaches to population problems in veterinary medicine, and provides a framework for disease prevention. Topics include investigation of disease outbreaks, surveillance of animal disease, and design of epidemiological studies. As part of the course, students will complete the initial stage of USDA accreditation. Credits 3. Every Spring.

DVM-623 Veterinary Pharmacology. This course reviews the elements of therapeutic decision making, the effects of disease processes on drug disposition and clinical pharmacology of infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic diseases commonly encountered in the practice of veterinary medicine. Credits 3. Every Spring.

DVM-624 Veterinary Toxicology. This course reviews the principles of toxicology, and the pathogenesis, detection, clinical signs, diagnosis and treatment of common poisonings in domestic animals. Credits 3. Every Spring.

DVM-625 Public Health and Food Safety. This course reviews principles of safe food production and handling from farm to table, food borne infections, and the general role of veterinarians in public health. Food hygiene and inspection, humane slaughter, and food-borne diseases are also discussed. Credits 2. Every Spring.

DVM-626 Veterinary Skills IV. This course engages students in the application and integration of knowledge acquired across the DVM program. Using deliberate practice and constant feedback the course involves development of manual dexterity, handling and restraint of common domestic animals, and improvement of communication skills. Students are also incorporated into the daily operation of partner institutions where they observe live animal procedures, progressively build professional competence, and participate in supervised case management and other activities routinely conducted in the practice of Veterinary Medicine. Credits 2. Every Spring.

DVM-627 Integration IV. This course reviews selected topics of Clinical Pathology, Epidemiology, Systemic Pathology, Toxicology, and Veterinary Pharmacology based on selected scenarios commonly seen in the practice of Veterinary Medicine. The course is designed to promote horizontal and vertical curricular integration, and to enhance student’s problem solving and critical thinking skills. Credits 1. Every Spring.

Year 3. Semester 1

DVM-710 Small Animal Medicine I. This course reviews pathophysiology, clinical signs, diagnosis, differential diagnoses, treatment, prevention and prognosis of common conditions of dogs and cats. The course includes disorders of the cardiovascular, endocrine, respiratory and nervous systems as well as selected infectious diseases.  Credits 5. Every Fall.

DVM-711 Small Animal Surgery. This course reviews the major pathophysiologic changes, diagnostic procedures, and treatments of surgical diseases of the dog and cat. Emphasis will be on the integration and utilization of thisinformation in clinical decision-making. Credits 5. Every Fall.

DVM-712 Anesthesia. This course integrates physiological and pharmacological principles in anesthesia, and reviews the principles and practice of anesthesia, analgesia and fluid therapy for veterinary species. Laboratory sessions are designed to provide students with practical experience in anesthetic techniques and equipment. Credits 3. Every Fall.

DVM-713 Diagnostic Imaging. This course reviews the principles of diagnostic image formation, radiation protection and identification of common abnormalities seen in images of domestic animals.  Credits 3. Every Fall.

DVM-714 Equine Medicine. This course reviews important equine diseases affecting the different body systems. The pathophysiology, etiology, clinical signs and treatments are reviewed. Credits 3. Every Fall.

DVM-715 Veterinary Skills V. This course engages students in the application and integration of knowledge acquired across the DVM program. Using deliberate practice and constant feedback the course involves development of manual dexterity, handling and restraint of common domestic animals, and improvement of communication skills. Students are also incorporated into the daily operation of partner institutions where they observe live animal procedures, progressively build professional competence, and participate in supervised case management and other activities routinely conducted in the practice of Veterinary Medicine. Credits 2. Every Fall.

Year 3. Semester 2

DVM-720 Small Animal Medicine II. This course reviews pathophysiology, clinical signs, diagnosis, differential diagnoses, treatment, prevention and prognosis of common conditions of dogs and cats, including ophthalmology and oncology. The course reviews disorders of the liver, pancreas, and the urinary, alimentary, hemo-lymphatic, and integumentary systems. Credits 5. Every Spring.

DVM-721 Large Animal Medicine. This course reviews the health management, diagnosis and treatment of important diseases of food-producing animals at the individual and herd levels. The pathophysiology, etiology, clinical signs and prevention are also discussed. Credits 4. Every Spring.

DVM-722 Exotics and Laboratory Animal Medicine. This course reviews basic concepts of clinical medicine and husbandry of laboratory animals, pet rabbits, ferrets, rodents and reptiles. The course also introduces students to topics such as the laws and regulations governing animal research, the use of non-human primates in research and animal welfare issues. Credits 3. Every Spring.

DVM-723 Large Animal Surgery. This course reviews common surgical conditions seen in horses and cattle. Clinical signs observed in the common surgical diseases of the horse and ruminants will be described and used to establish a problem list, which includes the pertinent differential diagnosis that must be considered. The rationale for the selection of specific diagnostic tests, including response to therapy, and the implication of medical or surgical treatment versus non – treatment relative to the prognosis of return to normal health and function will be emphasized, based on the current understanding of the pathophysiology involved. The primary emphasis is directed towards developing the skills, knowledge and attitudes that will permit the entry–level veterinarian to develop strategies to deal with common and uncommon surgical disease diagnoses. Credits 3. Every Spring.

DVM-724 Theriogenology. This course reviews reproductive function, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of common reproductive diseases observed in domestic animals. The course includes mammary gland, endocrine regulation of reproduction and lactation, and breeding soundness evaluation. Credits 3. Every Spring.

DVM-725 Veterinary Skills VI. This course engages students in the application and integration of knowledge acquired across the DVM program. Using deliberate practice and constant feedback the course involves development of manual dexterity, handling and restraint of common domestic species, and improvement of communication skills. Students are also incorporated into the daily operation of partner institutions where they observe live animal procedures, progressively build professional competence, and participate in supervised case management and other activities routinely conducted in the practice of Veterinary Medicine. Credits 2. Every Spring.

Year 4. 

DVM-800 Large Animal Medicine Clerkship. This core clerkship provides students with opportunities to participate in the diagnosis and treatment of common diseases and conditions seen in contemporary large animal medicine. Under the direct supervision of a veterinarian, ideally students will assume responsibility for the management of individual cases, and will be encouraged to participate in the decision-making process and clinical reasoning. This core rotation is 4 weeks in length. Time commitment is a minimum of 40 hours per week per student, and emergency and off-hour (7 days/week) duties may be required. Credits 4. Every Fall.

DVM-801 Small Animal Medicine Clerkship. In this core clerkship, students participate in the practice of clinical veterinary medicine. Students develop a detailed knowledge of the principles and techniques used in Small Animal Medicine with emphasis on patient evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of common diseases. Under direct supervision of an internal medicine team member, ideally students will assume responsibility for the management of individual cases, and will be encouraged to participate in the decision-making process and clinical reasoning. This core rotation is 4 weeks in length. Time commitment is a minimum of 40 hours per week per student, and emergency and off-hour duties may be required.  Credits 4. Every Fall.

DVM-802 Small Animal Surgery Clerkship. In this core clerkship students will be provided an opportunity to apply and further develop practice skills, techniques and principles learned in the third year surgery course. Students are expected to participate in and (under supervision) perform surgery on routine (spays, neuter, excise small mass) and complex surgical cases commensurate with the animal’s condition and the student’s ability. Under direct supervision of a surgery team member, students ideally will ideally assume responsibility for the management of individual cases, and will be encouraged to participate in the decision-making process and clinical reasoning. This core rotation is 4 weeks in length. Time commitment is a minimum of 40 hours per week per student, and emergency and off-hour duties may be required. Credits 4. Every Fall.

DVM-803 Anesthesia Clerkship. This is a core clerkship designed to provide clinical experience in the use of anesthetics in small companion animals. The student will develop an understanding of the selection, dosage, and administration of anesthetic drugs and other life supportive therapy. Under direct supervision of the anesthesia team, students will be given responsibility for the management of individual cases and are encouraged to participate in the decision-making process and clinical reasoning. The core rotation is 2 weeks in length; students can enroll for additional 2 weeks as an elective. Time commitment is a minimum of 40 hours per week per student, and emergency and off-hour (7 days/week) duties may be required. Credits 2. Every Fall.

DVM-804 Clinical Pathology Clerkship. This core clerkship provides students with case oriented review of veterinary hematology, cytology, clinical chemistry. Students gain experience with fine needle aspiration, recognition and interpretation of alterations in peripheral blood smears, cytologic samples, and biochemistry panel from serum and other body fluids. Time commitment is a minimum of 40 hours per week per student, and emergency and off-hour duties may be required. The core rotation is 2 weeks in length; students can enroll for additional 2 weeks as an elective. Credits 2. Every Fall.

DVM-805 Anatomic Pathology Clerkship. This core clerkship involves hands-on exposure to diagnostic autopsies of species presented to the pathology room. Students perform autopsies under the guidance of pathology faculty and/or resident. The core rotation is 2 weeks in length; students can enroll for additional 2 weeks as an elective. Credits 2. Every Spring.

DVM-806 Diagnostic Imaging Clerkship. In this core clerkship, students develop interpretation skills and ability to perform common procedures used in diagnostic imaging. Depending on caseload students will use radiographic, CT, ultrasonography techniques to evaluate animal patients.  Time commitment is a minimum of 40 hours per week per student, and emergency and off-hour duties may be required.  The core rotation is 2 weeks in length; students can enroll for additional 2 weeks as an elective. Credits 2. Every Spring.

DVM-807 Emergency/ Critical Care Clerkship. This core clerkship provides the student with opportunities to develop skills in assessment and evaluation of critically ill patients.  Students participate in discussions about evaluation, triage, and management of emergency and critically ill patients, stabilization of the trauma patient, and management of cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and neurological disorders. Under direct supervision of a team member, ideally students will assume responsibility for the management of individual cases, and will be encouraged to participate in the decision-making process and clinical reasoning. The core rotation is 2 weeks in length; students can enroll for additional 2 weeks as an elective. Time commitment is a minimum of 40 hours per week per student, and emergency and off-hour (7 days/week) duties are commonly required. Credits 2. Every Spring.

DVM-808-811 Elective Clerkships. These fourth year elective clerkships may cover a variety of disciplines including but not limited to anesthesia, animal behavior, aquaculture/aquatic animal medicine, avian medicine, cardiology, dentistry, dermatology, diagnostic imaging, emergency medicine, equine medicine, exotic animal medicine, integrative and rehabilitative medicine, internal medicine, laboratory animal medicine, neurology, oncology, orthopedic surgery, ophthalmology, pathology, production animal medicine, soft tissue surgery, zoo animal medicine, etc. Elective clerkships are 2-3 weeks in length. Time commitment is a minimum of 40 hours per week per student, and emergency and off-hour (7 days/week) duties are commonly required. Credits 2-3. Every Spring.